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source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: iraq

humanitarian agencies are rushing to prepare for the humanitarian impact of the military campaign. emergency sites are being constructed and stocks of life-saving supplies are being pre-positioned.

(baghdad, 18 february 2017): with military operations to retake western mosul beginning, humanitarian organizations are warning that tens of thousands of families are at extreme risk. recent surveys with key informants confirm that food and fuel supplies are dwindling, markets and shops have closed, running water is scarce and electricity in many neighborhoods is either intermittent or cut off.

“the situation is distressing. people, right now, are in trouble. we are hearing reports of parents struggling to feed their children and to heat their homes,” said lise grande, humanitarian coordinator for iraq. “the battle hasn’t started but already there is a humanitarian crisis.”

the un estimates that between 750,000 and 800,000 civilians are resident in the western section of the city. few, if any commercial supplies have reached mosul during the past three months after the main road to syria was cut-off. informants report that nearly half of all food shops have closed. bakeries throughout the area have run out of fuel and many can no longer afford to purchase costly flour. prices of kerosene and cooking gas have skyrocketed and many of the most destitute families are burning wood, furniture, plastic or garbage for cooking and heating.

“children and their families are starting to face critical shortages of safe drinking water,” said peter hawkins, unicef representative in iraq. “three out of five people now depend on untreated water from wells for cooking and drinking as water systems and treatment plants have been damaged by fighting or run out of chlorine.”

“food prices in western mosul are almost double than in eastern mosul,” said sally haydock, representative of the world food programme in iraq. “we are extremely concerned that many families do not have enough to eat in western mosul.”

humanitarian agencies are rushing to prepare for the humanitarian impact of the military campaign. emergency sites are being constructed south of the city and stocks of life-saving supplies are being pre-positioned for the 250,000 – 400,000 civilians who may flee.

“we don’t know what will happen during the military campaign but we have to be ready for all scenarios. tens of thousands of people may flee or be forced to leave the city. hundreds of thousands of civilians might be trapped—maybe for weeks, maybe for months,” said ms. grande. “protecting civilians is the highest priority in a situation like this—nothing is more important.”

for further information, please contact:

damian rance, communications officer, un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs in iraq, ([email protected] / +964 (0)751 740 3858


Information

source: reuters - thomson reuters foundation
country: south sudan

at cina, a local organisation supported by unicef, case workers painstakingly trace separated families. their database of lost children currently holds 15,000 names, but the programme is chronically underfunded.

last year, reunifications dropped by 50 percent because there was not enough money to trace families

by siegfried modola

bentiu, feb 16 (reuters) - in the chaos of south sudan's civil war, it took three years for nyagonga machul to find her lost children.

machul had travelled from her village to the capital when president salva kiir, an ethnic dinka, fired his deputy riek machar, a nuer, in 2013. the dismissal triggered a civil war in the world's newest nation that has increasingly been fought along ethnic lines.

read more on the thomson reuters foundation


Information

source: un high commissioner for refugees
country: yemen

deaths through famine and lack of medical attention in the country are being aggravated as un refugee agency relief operations are just one per cent funded.

deaths through famine and lack of medical attention in the country are being aggravated as un refugee agency relief operations are just one per cent funded.

by: tim gaynor | 17 february 2017

geneva – people in war-ravaged yemen are dying of famine and lack of medical attention in a situation now “beyond any humanitarian catastrophe,” unhcr, the un refugee agency said today, warning the crisis would likely worsen as humanitarian needs are acutely underfunded.

“there is significant famine, there are people dying because of lack of medical attention, there are people who are out of schools simply because the schools are being used as shelters for displaced people,” said unhcr’s representative in yemen, ayman gharaibeh.

“we used to say last year that we were in a catastrophe. now we’ve said that it is beyond any humanitarian catastrophe that we’ve seen,” he said, speaking on the sidelines of a news briefing at the palais des nations in geneva.

“it is beyond any humanitarian catastrophe that we’ve seen.”

war reignited in the country of 27 million people in march 2015, creating a situation where fully two-thirds of the population – or some 18 million people - are now dependent on external aid in order to survive. the situation facing many of the three million people displaced from their homes in yemen is essentially a struggle for survival – food, water and shelter are priority.

many are now enduring miserable and inadequate conditions living in overcrowded or makeshift shelters for months on end and without sufficient protection.

providing an effective response is currently being hindered by an acute funding shortfall that has left unhcr with just one per cent of the us$99.6 million it needs to continue its vital relief operations in the year ahead, gharaibeh said.

“we are at the beginning of the year – we’re in mid-february – and it’s important that we have contributions in a timely, phased manner, with the pace to allow us to plan … in a way that will continue to provide that same level of assistance throughout the year,” he said.

whereas in 2016, unhcr spent us$76 million in its emergency response to different waves of displacement and stockpiling relief items in yemen, gharaibeh said it has started this year with just us$600,000 in its bank account.

having a fully funded operation “gives us the opportunity to have different options, be it for shelter, be it for cash programming,” he added.

“without resources ... it really means that we will have more and more people languishing in the streets.”

in an example of the impact the funding shortage was having, gharaibeh said unhcr would not be able to follow through with financial assistance to some 2,000 vulnerable widows identified as in need. “there have been assessments done in terms of vulnerability, but since that has not been matched with funding, it undermines our credibility, and the credibility of the response.

“without resources we are not useful at all in yemen. we need to be able to identify needs, identify who is deserving … and make sure we are able to respond.”

the current situation has been compounded by decades of neglect, which has left weak institutions, poor government, and a feeble economy.

“every aspect of life is impacted and without this, it really means that we will have more and more people languishing in the streets. an unstable yemen is not going to be a stable region, and that’s not in the interest of any of its neighbours.”


Information

source: catholic agency for overseas development, actionaid, coopi - cooperazione internazionale, global alliance for improved nutrition, norwegian refugee council, tearfund, care, caritas, search for common ground, christian aid, mercy corps, action contre la faim france, médecins du monde, oxfam, international rescue committee, refugees international, save the children, plan, secours islamique france, center for civilians in conflict
country: cameroon, chad, niger, nigeria

ahead of next week's conference in oslo on the humanitarian crisis in north east nigeria and the lake chad basin, some 22 ngos have identified seven steps needed to make an impact.

a violent eight-year conflict originating in nigeria has intensified in the last four years and spread across borders into niger, chad and cameroon, resulting in africa’s biggest humanitarian and protection crisis.

across the lake chad basin, 17 million people are affected by the conflict, and over 2.6 million – of which 1.5 million are children – have fled their homes in search of safety and protection. hunger and malnutrition remain at critical levels with 7.1 million people severely food insecure – 5.1 million of them in nigeria alone. in borno state in northeast nigeria, at least 400,000 people could currently be experiencing famine- like conditions.

collectively governments, un, ngos and donors have been slow to acknowledge the scale of the crisis, shift gear from development to humanitarian mode to meet needs at scale, effectively mobilize resources, and gain access to those trapped by conflict. military and political objectives in the fight against boko haram have trumped humanitarian concerns. however, a large humanitarian operation is now under way. the number of deaths and rates of acute malnutrition have been reduced in some areas where access has been possible in nigeria, while in niger the humanitarian response remains patchy, in cameroon the food insecurity remains alarmingly high and chad remains the forgotten crisis amidst a forgotten crisis.

on the 23rd and 24th of february 2017 the international community will convene in oslo, norway to discuss how to address the humanitarian crisis in north east nigeria and the lake chad basin. as concerned non- governmental organisations we highly welcome this initiative. the oslo donor conference is a welcome chance to raise the profile of the crisis, address the urgent humanitarian needs, raise more money from a wider set of donors, and come up with a concrete set of recommendations and proposals to strengthen the collective response to the crisis and the long-term needs in the region. below are seven steps needed to save more lives and assist people in nigeria and lake chad basin.

step 1: put protection of civilians at the centre of response

prioritise the protection of civilians. women, girls, men and boys have been subjected to horrific levels of human rights abuses and threats including sexual violence, abductions, killings, torture, forced recruitment, forced disappearance and arbitrary detention. boko haram continues to attack and abuse civilians, while soldiers, police, and government officials have allegedly used their positions of authority and gifts of desperately needed food or other items to sexually exploit and abuse vulnerable people, particularly women and girls. separate incidents of rape have also been reported at the hands of security forces. military interventions must uphold people's rights in accordance with international humanitarian law and should not exacerbate the humanitarian situation. accountability measures must be put in place to prosecute those who harm civilians. a particular priority should be the development of specific livelihood and prevention strategies that protect women and girls from violence, rape and sexual exploitation. attention must also be paid to the significant risks faced by boys and men who are frequently killed, detained, conscripted or disappeared. aid has been militarized with military actors responsible for camp management and aid distribution, especially in newly accessible areas. we call on governments to ensure that food reaches the affected population, including idps in camps in newly accessible areas without any restrictions. it is important that camp management is transferred over to civilian authorities as soon as possible, within a clear timeline. emergency measures that have attempted to cut off boko haram from their food supplies and revenue sources have in the process cut people off from their livelihoods, markets and access to food. governments have a duty to protect and facilitate people’s freedom of movement and access to their livelihoods including fishing, farming and markets. governments in the region must also uphold the right of people to flee conflict and violence, and respect international protection measures for refugees such as the principle of non-refoulement.

step 2: scale-up the food and nutrition response in nigeria and the region

an urgent scale up of the food and nutrition response is needed. the bulk of funding required for 2017 is for nutrition and food security. sufficient, timely and flexible funding is needed to ensure the scale-up of in-kind food where necessary, and cash so that people can buy food. improved coordination and leadership is essential to reach more people with food assistance in the coming months to stave off hunger in regional countries, and famine in nigeria – the latter requires a full food pipeline without further delay. the un and humanitarian community need to develop clear contingency plans and pre- position food and other relief items to ensure lifesaving aid can be rapidly deployed as new areas become accessible and where hunger and malnutrition is likely to be most dire. funding also needs to be increased for emergency nutrition to combat severe levels of malnutrition and prevent children from dying. the long-term health impacts of malnutrition are extreme and a scale-up of malnutrition screening and treatment services is required. children who are malnourished at the start of life are also severely disadvantaged in their ability to learn. funding for livelihoods and food security also needs to be increased. without agriculture and livestock support, many farmers and herders will not be able to produce their own food or earn an income. 78% of idps in nigeria are living in host communities, placing considerable strain on the latter’s limited resources. we therefore need a coordinated coherent out of camp humanitarian strategy and funding for host community response.

step 3: increase access to more, better and safe quality education

give children and youth a passport to their future. 3 245 000 children are in need of emergency education in the region. although schools, teachers and students have been deliberately targeted in this conflict, the education sector is heavily underfunded. this has to change. every day a child is out of school is a day too many. education not only has an instrumental role to play in helping the affected children heal the wounds from a terrible conflict, feel protected and acquire the necessary skills to progress, but education is also the foundation needed for the region to develop and prosper. this is why we urgently call on all humanitarian actors, including governments, to recognize education as key to the response. the funding gap for education needs to be closed. funding should include a focus on systems strengthening, reconstruction of school buildings and payment and training of teachers; as well as strengthening of community participation, particularly through school based management committees. the humanitarian response must also support quality non-formal education programs targeting idp children in both camps and host communities. furthermore, we call for the immediate cessation of attacks against educational facilities, personnel, and students as well as a stop to the military use of such infrastructures in line with the safe school declaration. we encourage all parties to the conflict to vacate immediately any schools they are occupying and ensure that schools are safe for students to return. teachers must be given the necessary training in conflict-sensitive approaches to education, including how to keep children safe at school. particular attention should be given to the teachers and children who have been targeted, abducted and physically and/or psychologically mistreated due to the conflict.

step 4: safeguard humanitarian space: safe movement to reach more people in need

safe access to people must be guaranteed. ensuring that people in need can reach humanitarian assistance is the biggest challenge for humanitarian operations due to insecurity and restrictions on freedom of movement. people must be able to flee areas of conflict and reach lifesaving assistance. there is also an urgent need to increase agencies’ ability to access hard to reach areas to meet humanitarian need. it is therefore essential that governments provide unhindered humanitarian access to communities, particularly in insecure and inaccessible areas. bureaucratic obstacles must be removed, such as difficulties with registration and unclear processes for visas and customs clearance, including pharmaceuticals, as these delay and hinder humanitarian operations. in northeast nigeria, niger and chad armed escorts are required or are being used by some agencies to access populations in insecure zones. the use of armed escorts in aid provision can limit ngo activities, as being associated with the military may put staff and beneficiaries at risk. alternatives for allowing movement within insecure areas are needed, and this requires greater investment and resources to facilitate access negotiations and improve civil-military coordination, including increasing the number of civil-military and access staff in all four countries. a priority should be establishing clear, written civil-military coordination guidelines in accordance with the international un guidelines on the use of military and civil defence assets to support un humanitarian activities in complex emergencies. such coordination is also imperative for facilitating rapid response mechanisms (rrm), and ensuring that such mechanisms can operate in line with humanitarian principles – maintaining neutrality, impartiality and independence. all rrms should be designed with the ability to operate independently from the military and with strong coordination across all sectors to ensure the strongest response with the widest reach possible.

step 5: strengthen leadership of the response and improve humanitarian coordination

ensure greater investment in further strengthening un, government and ngo leadership, decision making, coordination and the accountability of the humanitarian response. this can be achieved through additional resources for reliable data collection, increasing the number of information managers and better identifying needs and gaps. it also requires clarification roles and responsibilities in order to improve prioritisation, orient operational partners and adapt responses to ensure a needs-based response that is accountable to affected people. we welcome the shift of the centre of gravity of the response in nigeria from abuja to maiduguri, and we need to ensure that information and communication sharing between field-level working groups and clusters and the capitals are strengthened in all four countries. we need stronger local, national and international ngo representation in government-led coordination platforms as the main implementers of assistance on the ground. in nigeria, coordination of the inter- ministerial task force (imtf) with other government-mandated agencies needs strengthening, and interlocutors with humanitarian community need to be clearly identified. we need donors to fund the humanitarian response plans in order to consolidate gains and to meet the needs of a greater number of people. we need a clear resource mobilization plan, and better coordination between humanitarian and development actors. the critically needed support to nigeria must not compromise the support to regional countries. governments of the region also need to allocate greater resources to the response and be clear and transparent about what they are doing.

step 6: ensure all returns are safe, voluntary and dignified

minimum standards must be met before genuine returns can take place. surveys conducted with idps show that many people wish to return back to their homes. however, they are also explicit that they are only willing to return under certain conditions, such as guarantees of security and assurances that they will be safe, and access basic services and livelihoods. accurate figures on the numbers who have so far returned are unavailable as there is no tracking in place to monitor the returns, including of refugees who are also moving across borders in the region. moreover, many “returns” are actually secondary displacement, as people move to towns closer to home but aren’t able to return to their villages of origin. all actors must recognise that such movement does not in fact meet the definition of “return” as a recognised durable solution. the governments of nigeria, and regional governments and international community must ensure that all return of idps to their homes or areas of origin is voluntary and safe. while many idps are eager to return home, they must be given accurate information to make independent decisions about when to do so. civilians cannot be part of strategies aimed at holding territory, and dispersal of idps to areas closer to home is not an appropriate solution for overcrowding. channels for communicating and coordinating on the response to people’s movement should be established and systems for tracking and monitoring movement should be put in place to ensure timely identification of needs and protection issues, and to respond to these effectively. as both return and secondary movement continue, security of tenure, access to land and other issues related to housing, land and property must be addressed to support livelihoods, safety, and social cohesion. all returns must be accompanied by security guarantees, repair of damaged infrastructure and property and the provision of humanitarian assistance and basic services, including dispute resolution. displaced people should not be encouraged to return where service providers and local authorities have not. meanwhile, it remains imperative to improve conditions and scale up assistance to idps in camps and host communities. returns should be a choice rather than as a last resort because of appalling living conditions in areas of displacement.

step 7: build resilience and increase local capacity

importance of building resilience and addressing long term solutions. the crisis is taking place against a backdrop of long-term vulnerability to a range of shocks and hazards, including conflict, climate change, environmental degradation, deep-rooted poverty, joblessness and lack of good governance. for this reason, whilst maintaining an emphasis on life-saving humanitarian assistance and meeting urgent needs, it is also crucial to tackle the underlying causes of the conflict. we call on donors and governments to allocate longer term and predictable funding that allows for the response to incorporate a resilience-building, long-term and conflict-sensitive approach that creates links between humanitarian and development efforts. it is also important to target not only displaced people but also host communities and other affected groups, so as not to put at risk the social cohesion between them. the humanitarian community must support and work with local partners to ensure sustainability and local ownership. there is a need to support the livelihoods of affected people, including farmers who have been forced from their land, fishermen who are unable to access the lake due to insecurity, traders who are unable to access markets. the affected population must receive assistance that help to build their assets, so that they do not resort to risky or short term strategies, such as selling tools or livestock which are vital for their future prospects. long term access to basic services such as water, health and education must be provided to all. the needs of particularly vulnerable groups, such as women and girls, must be identified and addressed. the affected people in the area are agents of their own change, and a resilience-building approach should involve them closely in planning and build on their existing methods for tackling the risks they face. it must therefore be a priority for all actors involved in the humanitarian response to build strategic relationships with local organisations, civil society and stakeholders. above all, a security approach alone will not provide a long-term solution to this crisis. it is only through investing in political solutions, protecting people, upholding their rights, and investing development and the regions’ people, particularly the children and youth, will we witness peace again in the region.

this statement is endorsed by the following ngos:

actionaid nigeria

action against hunger

cafod

care international

center for civilians in conflict

christian aid

coopi - cooperazione internazionale

caritas norway

ehealth africa

gain

international rescue committee

medecins du monde

mercy corps

norwegian refugee council

oxfam

plan international

refugees international

save the children

search for common ground

sif - secours islamique france

tearfund

world university service (wus) zoa

footnotes

1 lake chad basin humanitarian needs and requirement overview (2017), http://reliefweb.int/report/nigeria/2017-lake-chad-basin-humanitarian-needs-and-requirement-overview

2 iom (2016), “regional displacement and human mobility analysis”, dec. 2016, http://www.globaldtm.info/regional-displacement-and-human-mobility-analysis/

3 lake chad basin: crisis overview (8 december 2016), http://reliefweb.int/report/nigeria/lake-chad-basin-crisis-overview-8-december-2016

4 fews net, (13 december 2016), http://www.fews.net/west-africa/nigeria/alert/december-13-2016

5 human rights watch (2016), “nigeria: officials abusing displaced women, girls displaced by boko haram and victims twice over”, https://www.hrw.org/news/2016/10/31/nigeria-officials-abusing-displaced-women-girls

6 iom (2016), “regional displacement and human mobility analysis”, dec. 2016, http://www.globaldtm.info/regional-displacement-and-human-mobility-analysis/

7 lake chad basin humanitarian needs and requirement overview (2017), http://reliefweb.int/report/nigeria/2017-lake-chad-basin-humanitarian-needs-and-requirement-overview

8 the safe schools declaration is an inter-governmental political commitment that express political support for the protection of students, teachers, and schools during times of armed conflict. as of january 2017, 57 countries have endorsed the safe schools declaration, including chad, niger and nigeria.

9 http://ochaonline.un.org/cmcs/guidelines


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: ethiopia, kenya, somalia, uganda

in several ways the situation is worse than in 2010-11 because this is the third consecutive year of drought and multiple years of diminished food production have exhausted people’s capacity to cope with another shock.

$1.9 billion total requirements

2.3 million refugees

2.1 million internally displaced people

12.8 million number of severely food insecure people

situation overview

the 2016 deyr or short rains season (october to december) brought severely low levels of rainfall to the region. the rainfall deficit was particularly acute across somalia, southern and southeastern ethiopia, northern and coastal kenya and – to a lesser extent – southwestern ethiopia and central and southwestern uganda and southeastern south sudan. analysis of the cumulative regional rainfall from august to december shows severe deficits. areas such as central and southern somalia have registered only a third of their usual seasonal levels.

in several ways the situation is worse than in 2010-11 because (i) this is the third consecutive year of drought in the region and multiple years of diminished food production has exhausted people’s capacity to cope with another shock; (ii) the greater region suffers from chronic and intensifying conflicts, continued access constraints in some areas, rising refugee numbers and communicable disease outbreaks; and (iii) the drought is expected to worsen in the coming months, with low rainfall forecast for march to may – which is the main rainy season for pastoralist and agro-pastoralist communities in the current drought belt.

the drought has had a major impact on water resources, including on river flow levels and the availability of water for human and livestock consumption. in somalia, the southern part of the shabelle river has run dry, the dawa river is drying faster the normal and the juba river have reached very low levels. most water points in worst-affected areas of the three countries are in near-dry status. water supply for irrigated crop production has also been impacted as the drought extends over key river basins.

widespread crop failures have affected farming and agro-pastoral communities in most of somalia, southwestern ethiopia and northeastern kenya, where poor moisture conditions prevented planting and stifled early crop growth. areas dependent on the deyr / hagaya / short rains are facing significant food shortages and are likely to remain dependent on markets until the next harvest in february 2018.
although global wheat and maize prices continued to fall during the last quarter of 2016, the fao food price index for east africa has more than doubled in 2016. this trend accelerated into 2017, including increases of 30 to 40 per cent for maize and sorghum in localized areas of somalia and a 75 per cent spike in the price of maize in uganda.

livestock are becoming increasingly weak, contracting diseases and dying at alarming rates, with catastrophic consequences for pastoral communities. significant livestock deaths are reported in drought-affected areas of ethiopia, somalia and kenya, mostly affecting sheep and cattle. livestock losses have serious impact on livelihoods; even if half of a herd survives, it will take a minimum of two to four years for pastoralist and agro pastoralist households to recover.

terms of trade are declining sharply for pastoralists, contributing to rising food insecurity and malnutrition. livestock prices are collapsing due to poor body conditions and extremely limited demand. sheep and goats are selling for about one-third the normal price, and cattle and camels are sold at half their usual value. in marsabit, the price of a sheep has declined by 90 per cent. herders are being forced to sell their remaining assets for very low prices to afford food for their families – the price of which is increasing.

household production of milk and meat is low and the price of milk and other dairy products has skyrocketed. this means protein-rich food is increasingly out of reach for vulnerable pastoralists. food consumption patterns are deteriorating, with many households in cross-border areas reporting that they are skipping meals and eating less when they do eat. in turkana 42 per cent of households skipped the entire day without eating. research shows the close link between forage condition and child malnutrition, and highlights the importance of early livelihood interventions, such as livestock offtake and animal feed provision, to reduce malnutrition.

12.8 million people in ethiopia, uganda, kenya and somalia face are severely food insecure and are in need of humanitarian assistance. following the short-rain assessment in january 2017, the number of food insecure people in kenya has doubled to 2.7 million compared to 1.3 million in august 2016. some 5.6 million people in ethiopia require food assistance this year. nearly 3 million somalis are expected to face crisis and emergency levels by june 2017, more than double compared to the previous six months. severe drought, rising prices, continued insecurity, humanitarian access limitations, and depressed rain forecasts suggest famine is possible in somalia in 2017.

approximately 600,000 children aged 6 to 59 months in somalia, kenya and ethiopia will be in need of treatment for severe acute malnutrition in 2017 and this number is expected to rise rapidly. in somalia, 13 out of 27 rural and displaced groups have global acute malnutrition (gam) rates above emergency (15 per cent) levels. in kenya three sub-counties (turkana north, north hor and mandera) have gam rates above 30 per cent – double the emergency threshold. another six sub-counties (turkana central, turkana south, turkana west, laisamis,
east pokot and isiolo) have gam rates between 15 and 29 per cent.

the drought and the associated reduced access to water and sanitation has the potential to further exacerbate ongoing disease outbreaks and create new ones. about 15 million people will not have access to safe drinking water in ethiopia, kenya and somalia in 2017. in somalia’s southern regions and puntland 3,113 cases of cholera have been reported in january 2017, which is significantly higher than the number of cases recorded over the same period in 2016. although the cholera outbreak affecting 30 out of 47 counties in kenya since december 2014 has been contained - except in tana river -, there is a risk of new cases appearing in border areas due to scarcity of water and the movement of people.

drought, economic shocks and conflict in the region have disrupted the education of approximately 6 million children in ethiopia, kenya and somalia. an increase in school drop-outs and child labour has been observed across the region. in somalia, more than 110,000 school-aged children enrolled in schools in drought-affected areas are at risk of being forced out of education. in ethiopia, 578 schools have temporarily closed due to the effects of the drought, affecting nearly 228,000 students. in kenya, 175,000 pre-primary and primary school children in ten counties are out of school due to drought.

the drought has triggered movements of families in search of grazing land, water and work, increasing the risk of family separation and tensions among communities over scarce resources. in the first three weeks of 2017 alone, more than 33,000 people were displaced due to drought in southern and central somalia alone, including 3,000 who crossed the border into ethiopia. in borama, somaliland, approximately 8,000 households (40,000 individuals) were newly displaced in january 2017. children constitute the majority of the displaced population. the high number of people concentrating around water points increases the risk of sexual violence and exploitation. during the previous drought in 2010-11 the number of underage girls sold into child marriage in exchange for livestock increased as families struggled to survive.

repeated cycles of climatic shocks, coupled with insufficient recovery periods, have limited household and community coping mechanisms. as a result, drought-impacted households have a higher propensity to deploy harmful coping strategies which may deplete their household assets, both material and human, further limiting their ability to mitigate future shocks and make productive investments which can break the cycle of poverty and humanitarian risk.


Information

source: oxfam
country: syrian arab republic

people who have returned to their homes have seen water shortages add to their woes. they now rely on public wells and trucks delivering water to certain points.

hassan*, 15, is one of an estimated 1.8 million people who were left without running water in aleppo for nearly a month, as isis militants, in control of the main water source to the city, had reportedly shut down the water supply.

the young boy fills two jerry cans from a public well, and heads back home to his mother and sister in aleppo. he will do the trip several times to fulfill their water needs.

“every other day, i do four or five round trips to the nearest public well, to fill my jerry cans and provide my family with about 150 liters of water. the task takes about two hours,” says hassan, who speaks about water running in the taps as a “dream”.

hassan, who moved from then rebel-held east to government-controlled west aleppo three years ago, had managed to find a job in a local store to support his 7-year old sister hanine and their mother suad* after his father passed away from a heart-attack.

though hassan is back at school now in west aleppo, his days are unlike any other teenager’s, as he has to worry about the lack of water instead of focusing on his homework. “i get tired, but feel happy to be able to help my mother and sister,” he says.

providing clean and safe water

all of aleppo is now controlled by the government of syria. but the eastern part of the city, which sustained a long military offensive and heavy damages, still has not recovered from its near-entire destruction.

people who have returned to their homes have seen water shortages add to their woes. they now rely on public wells and trucks delivering water to certain points.

to respond to this situation, oxfam has rehabilitated seven wells which had been equipped with new hardware a year ago by its team. this activity was part of an inter-agency effort to maintain at least 122 wells and provide clean water to aleppo’s nearly 2 million residents.

oxfam has also installed four tanks with a capacity of 45,000 each, and over 117 household water tanks (of 500 and 1000 liters capacity) to increase the storage capacity of water in areas hosting a large number of people who were displaced from their homes.

the organization also distributed hygiene kits (containing shampoo, soap, razors, sanitary pads and other essential products), blankets, water bottles and mats to thousands of displaced people.

in march 2016, oxfam installed a first generator at aleppo’s main water station that kicks in in the case of a power cut. the organization moved a second one from west to east aleppo in december 2016 in coordination with the syrian arab red cresent (sarc). once installed, this generator will have the same function as the first, and both will help pump water to more than one million people.


Information

source: un children's fund
country: ukraine

the increase – an additional 420,000 girls and boys – is due to the continued fighting and the steady deterioration of life in eastern ukraine, where some 1.7 million people have been displaced.

kyiv/geneva, 17 february 2017 – as the volatile conflict in eastern ukraine enters its fourth year, 1 million children are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance - nearly double the number this time last year, said unicef.

the increase – an additional 420,000 girls and boys – is due to the continued fighting and the steady deterioration of life in eastern ukraine, where some 1.7 million people have been internally displaced, and many families have lost their incomes, social benefits and access to healthcare, while the price of living has sharply risen.

“this is an invisible emergency – a crisis most of the world has forgotten,” said giovanna barberis unicef representative in ukraine. “children in eastern ukraine have been living under the constant threat of unpredictable fighting and shelling for the past three years. their schools have been destroyed, they have been forced from their homes and their access to basic commodities like heat and water has been cut off.”

hundreds of daily ceasefire violations put children’s physical safety and psychological well-being at risk. the situation is particularly grave for the approximately 200,000 girls and boys living within 15 kilometers on each side of the ‘contact line’ in eastern ukraine, a line which divides government and non-government controlled areas where fighting is most severe.

in this zone, 19,000 children face constant danger from landmines and other unexploded ordinance and 12,000 children live in communities shelled at least once a month. thousands of children are regularly forced to take refuge in improvised bomb shelters.

teachers, psychologists and parents report signs of severe psychosocial distress among children including nightmares, aggression, social withdrawal and panic triggered by loud noises.

more than 740 schools – 1 in 5 in eastern ukraine - have been damaged or destroyed.

unicef once again calls for all sides to immediately recommit to the ceasefire signed in minsk in august 2015 and to respect international humanitarian law, including allowing unrestricted humanitarian access.

“after three horrific years, children in eastern ukraine urgently need lasting peace, so that their unnecessary suffering ends,” said barberis.

unicef is appealing for us$31.3 million to provide health and nutrition support, education, clean water, hygiene and sanitation as well as protection for children and families affected by the conflict. so far, approximately 10 per cent of the appeal has been funded.

###

note to editor

in 2016 unicef;

· provided 207,000 children and caregivers with psychosocial support.

· reached 500,000 children and their families with mine risk education.

· delivered warm clothing to 10,000 children and families living in poor communities close to the contact line.

· reached 2.5 million people with safe drinking water and vital water, sanitation and hygiene infrastructure.

· rehabilitated 50 schools and provided education materials for 150,000 children.

· supported the safe births of approximately 29,000 babies with midwifery kits.

###

download broadcast quality photos.


about unicef

unicef promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do. together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere.

for more information about unicef and its work for children, visit www.unicef.org.

follow unicef on twitter and facebook

**for more information or for interviews please contact:

**iuliia poberezhna, unicef kyiv, +380 50 388 29 51 [email protected]

melanie sharpe, unicef geneva, +41 79 834 74 01 [email protected]

kristen elsby, unicef geneva, +41 79 938 8273 [email protected]


Information

source: international federation of red cross and red crescent societies
country: fiji

“more than 32,000 houses were damaged or destroyed,” says red cross. “the shortage of builders and building materials is delaying people’s ability to repair or reconstruct their homes.”

suva / kuala lumpur, 17 february, 2017 – one year after tropical cyclone winston struck fiji, many survivors are still struggling to recover, says fiji red cross. according to red cross director general, filipe nainoca, significant progress has been made since the category 5 cyclone hit on 20 february, 2016, but some people in the worst affected areas of the country are still living in tents or temporary shelters.

“more than 32,000 houses were damaged or destroyed and shelter remains the priority need,” says mr nainoca. “the shortage of builders and building materials is delaying people’s ability to repair or reconstruct their homes.”

in the past year, fiji red cross has helped 77,000 people with emergency assistance and longer-term support to aid their recovery. the red cross operation has provided communities with clean water, emotional support to help people process the trauma of the emergency and its aftermath, as well as information on health risks. the red cross also rebuilt a school destroyed in the storm.

together with partners of the international federation of red cross and red crescent societies (ifrc), fiji red cross has also focused on helping people build back safer and stronger homes that are more resistant to future cyclones.

“through our build back safer programme we design and build demonstration houses that are built to withstand severe storms. we have also trained more than 60 local carpenters who have taken their skills back to their villages,” says mr nainoca.

“our volunteers have been working side by side with local communities on projects that address their priorities. these range from protecting fresh water springs from contamination to repairing and installing toilets to improve sanitation,” says mr nainoca. ”our aim has always been to meet people’s material as well as their emotional needs, ensuring that communities are more resilient to the impacts of future disasters.”

the red cross cyclone winston recovery operation will continue until the end of may 2017.

notes: video b-roll is available for download from the ifrc’s multimedia newsroom http://www.ifrcnewsroom.org/

for interviews and further information, please contact:

in fiji:

in kuala lumpur:

in geneva

for updates on twitter follow @fijiredcross @ifrcasiapacific hashtags #tcwinston #cyclonewinston

ifrc is the world`s largest humanitarian network comprising 190 national red cross and red crescent societies working to save lives and promote dignity around the world. www.ifrc.org - facebook - twitter - youtube – flickr


Information

source: food and agriculture organization of the united nations
country: malawi, namibia, south africa, world, zambia, zimbabwe

fall armyworm, which is mostly associated with the americas, is a new threat in southern africa and is currently affecting crops in at least seven countries in the region.

strengthening national and regional early warning systems, response and preparedness plans

16 february 2016, harare – sixteen east and southern african countries agreed today on urgent plans of action aimed at boosting the region’s capacity to manage emerging crop pests and livestock diseases, including armyworm and avian influenza.

this came at the end of a three-day, fao-organized emergency meeting in harare to discuss ways to respond to a major fall armyworm infestation affecting at least seven countries in the region, whose combined population is more than 70 percent of the total population of southern africa.

“fall armyworm, which is mostly associated with the americas, is a new threat in southern africa and we are very concerned with the emergence, intensity and spread of the pest. it is only a matter of time before most of the region will be affected, and the costs and implications of this are very serious, as seen in places where fall armyworm is endemic such as brazil, where the government spends in excess of $600 million each year to try to control infestations,” said david phiri, fao subregional coordinator for southern africa.

for his part, esaiah tjelele, the southern africa development community (sadc) representative at the meeting said: “due to the complexity of the infestation and gaps in technical capacities, countries are still struggling to make assessments on the damage that has so far been caused. pest identification services are also inadequate in some of the countries, hence delaying response action”.

zambia has reported that almost 90 000 hectares of maize have been affected, forcing farmers to replant their crops. in malawi some 17 000 hectares have so far been affected while in namibia, approximately 50 000 hectares of maize and millet has been damaged and in zimbabwe up to 130 000 hectares could be affected thus far.

preparedness and rapid response is crucial

participants at the harare meeting agreed that the fall armyworm infestation shows the urgent need for swift and coordinated action to deal with such threats. they identified gaps in the region’s early warning systems, response, preparedness, contingency planning, including information dissemination and effective regional coordination.

the meeting proposed a number of interventions to close such gaps and to boost critical research areas which can provide a better understanding of the pest and disease that pose threats to plants or animals.

fao said it will support countries in close collaboration with sadc and other partners and stakeholders to implement the necessary assessment activities aimed at improving understanding on the extent and intensity of the fall armyworm threat to the region.

these will also serve to mobilize the required resources including human expertise and funding. meanwhile, countries were also encouraged to roll-out awareness campaigns targeting farmers, extension workers and other stakeholders.

fao has initiated the process of procuring pheromone insect lure traps which are used for capturing armyworm and monitoring their spread.

highly pathogenic avian influenza

the meeting in harare also stressed the need to deal with emerging transboundary livestock diseases such as highly pathogenic avian influenza (hpai) which, if not properly managed, can spread rapidly with devastating impact on poultry production.

“prevention and early detection and speedy response to hpai is far cheaper than dealing with a full-blown outbreak,” moetapele letshwenyo of the world organization for animal health told meeting participants. he called upon development partners to fund hpai preparedness and control programmes and to build technical and response capacities of national public health systems.

on this, countries agreed on a set of measures including forming multi-stakeholder national and regional task forces to help coordinate and manage preparedness and response actions to hpai. the task forces will consist of specialists in animal and human medicine, epidemiology, virology and pathology.

countries also agreed to urgently begin disease surveillance and set up early warning systems. they would also review procedures, take stock of supplies and protective equipment, and simulate scenarios of how the outbreak would progress.

edward ogolla
communication specialist
fao – subregional office for southern africa (harare)
+263772240681 [email protected]

leonard makombe
national communication officer
fao – zimbabwe
+263772240682

[email protected]

rachel nandelenga

communication specialist

fao - subregional office for southern africa - resilience hub (johannesburg)

[email protected]


Information

source: voice of america
country: zimbabwe

after devastating several regions in mozambique, cyclone dineo has started causing sustained heavy winds and torrential rains in zimbabwe, including in mutare, chiredzi and beitbridge.

gibbs dube

washington — cyclone dineo has already started pounding some parts of zimbabwe with sustained heavy winds and torrential rains after devastating several regions in mozambique.

according to the meteriological services’ tich zinyemba, some of the areas already being pounded by the cyclone include mutare, chiredzi and beitbridge.

heavy rains are expected to continue until monday in several areas, which are already water-logged due to previous heavy rains.

zinyemba said people in the affected regions should stay in safe places and avoid venturing outside their hamlets or low-lying areas.

in 2000, cyclone eline devastated some regions leaving almost 136 people dead and 59,184 houses damaged.

the cyclone also killed 20,000 livestock and damaged 230 dams, 538 schools, 54 clinics and 14,999 toilets.


Information

source: agency for technical cooperation and development
country: iraq

with much of the city’s inhabitants having remained in the city or now returning, the provision of key services is vital to preventing the outbreak of disease and assisting on the path to recovery.

this report was written by acted’s ame unit to provide a snapshot of humanitarian needs and conditions in neighborhoods around mosul. data was collected via key informant and observational tools on feb 8th.

highlights

  • access to clean drinking water is the top priority need. al-tahrir residents are currently drinking water from unprotected boreholes or relying on water trucking.

  • livelihoods, cash and job opportunities are identified as a top priority need for this neighborhood.

  • markets are functioning and food, water, nfis and other goods are present in the market. however, a lack of cash and lack of income make these goods unavailable to most.

  • residents report limited ngo assistance in the form of in-kind food distribution at the present time.

situation overview

the city of mosul in northern iraq has been under isis control since june 2014, this period has been characterized by repression and human rights abuses. as the last remaining isis stronghold in iraq, the battle to retake mosul began in october 2016 and iraqi security forces and their allies have now successfully regained control of the section of the city east of the tigris river. while military operations to regain control of the western portion of the city continue, humanitarian space in the eastern part of mosul city is now opening up and there is access to provide humanitarian relief. with much of the city’s inhabitants having remained in the city during the battle or now returning, the provision of key services is vital to maintaining living standards, preventing the outbreak of disease and assisting on the path to recovery.

with fighting only 4 kilometers away, inhabitants still fear a resurgence of armed violence. key informants report that the neighborhood has not been cleared of ieds/uxos. despite this, residents express a strong intention to remain in mosul and move forward with their recovery.
local leadership: the key informants were unaware of any local leadership structure in their neighborhood. the mukhtar system is in place but is not well known to the local community at this time.


Information

source: un population fund
country: myanmar

the conditions of extreme stress combined with lack of privacy for displaced women and girls in kachin state results in their increased vulnerability to violence.

kachin state, myanmar – since the armed conflict in northern myanmar’s kachin state intensified in december, nearly 7,000 people have fled the area, often amid shelling and airstrikes. among the people on the run are 260 pregnant women. many of them are sleeping on the roadside, unable to find shelter. their needs are acute.

the area is highly militarized, and ongoing fighting and unsafe routes restrict access to the people in need.

through work with local humanitarian partner health poverty action, unfpa has delivered reproductive health care, clean delivery kits and dignity kits – which contain essential hygiene supplies including soap, sanitary napkins and clothing – through the lines of fire to pregnant, breastfeeding and vulnerable women.

women are under threat of violence, including sexual violence, both in daytime and at night. high-risk situations include having to manage sanitation and menstrual hygiene without shelter, privacy or protection.

women and girls at risk of assault

while many people on the run remain unaccounted for, some have arrived at camps away from the fighting. there they are staying in halls without partitions and sleeping on concrete floors.

many of the thousands of people who have fled were already living in camps, which they had to evacuate as the fighting approached. the conditions of extreme stress combined with lack of privacy mean that women and girls’ vulnerability to violence has escalated.

“women and girls fear assault each time they have to go into the forest to relieve themselves, each time they go to sleep without a door to lock behind them,” says unfpa field officer kyaw wai aung, who delivered dignity kits to displaced women in sadung township.

with the help of kachin baptist convention, unfpa has also distributed solar lanterns to women and girls to improve their safety at night.

and together with metta development foundation, unfpa is providing psychosocial support to the displaced people in both government-controlled and non-government-controlled areas in the conflict zone.

“i feel drained and without a soul”

hpauyam kaw mai, 44, fled the embattled maga yang camp to find shelter at the hpumlum yang camp. she was among the last to leave because she was not able to move her three children – ages four, six and seven – or her disabled husband.

“we made children go to bed to the sound of gunfire, afraid of the bullets coming our way. we didn’t have enough to eat. i don’t remember how many days we got through without meals. i don’t know what happened to the children either. they would not eat, even when we were given some biscuits.”

and together with metta development foundation, unfpa is providing psychosocial support to the displaced people in both government-controlled and non-government-controlled areas in the conflict zone.

when two-thirds of the camp population were gone, kaw mai was told to get ready to leave. she packed the family’s bags, and also the roofing and other parts of her shelter. they had to spend two nights sleeping out in the cold before they could be evacuated. in a temporary shelter at hpumlum yang camp, kaw mai is ill and struggling to care for her family.

she is now receiving unfpa-supported psychosocial care.

“i feel very small and vulnerable. i don’t know where to go and what to do. i don’t even know where i can collect a piece of firewood," she said. "i cannot bear the struggle any longer. i feel drained and without a soul.”


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: south sudan, sudan

over 65% of the 131,000 refugees who arrived in 2016 were children, many with critical levels of malnutrition. unhcr and partners anticipate the continued influx of refugees throughout 2017.

highlights

  • about 80,000 people returned to umm dukhun locality, central darfur between 2014 and 2016.

  • returnees in um dukhun have poor access to basic services—such as water, education, health and nutrition services.

  • over 300,000 south sudanese refugees have arrived in sudan since mid-december 2013.

  • wfp provided food assistance to 3.9 million people across sudan in 2016.

figures 2016 hrp

/# people in need in sudan (2016 hno) 5.8 million

/# people in need in darfur (2016 hno) 3.3 million

gam caseload 2.1 million

south sudanese refugee arrivals in sudan - since 15 dec 2013 (registered by unhcr) - as of 10 feb 2016: 305,000

refugees of other nationalities (registered by unhcr) - as of 31 oct 2016: 140,626

funding

568.4 million us$ received in 2016

59% reported funding (as of 12 february 2017)

about 80,000 people returned to umm dukhun locality, central darfur, between 2014 and 2016
from 18 to 25 january, an inter-agency team from the government of sudan, un and national and international ngos visited 10 return villages in umm dukhun locality in central darfur. the mission assessed the needs and verified numbers of returnees and host communities in garaaya, baltebei, salale, sereif, um jakaw, magan, elsinan, soreah and moraya villages.

umm dukhun locality has experienced two waves of civilian displacement, the first in 2003 and the second in 2013, following clashes between the salamat and misseriya tribes. people mostly fled to refugee camps and settlements in chad, as well as within umm dukhun locality and to other states in sudan.

according to international organization for migration’s (iom), 80,387 people have returned to their areas of origin in umm dukhun locality between 2014 and 2016, the largest number of returns in sudan to any given locality during that period.

reasons given by people returning from chad include reduction of humanitarian assistance in chad, the change in the school curriculum, restriction of movement within chad as well as improved security in umm dukhun locality.

according to the mission findings, returnees have poor access to basic services such as water, education, health and nutrition services. returnees also lost their possessions when they fled and return without many belongings and lack income-generating and other livelihood opportunities necessary for effective reintegration in their village. settlements are scattered within umm dukhun, posing a further challenge for the provision of services. in addition, to reduce tensions among/between communities, peace-building and reconciliation interventions are needed.

over 300,000 south sudanese refugees in sudan
the number of south sudanese refugees in sudan since december 2013 has surpassed the 300,000 mark and as of 13 february and stands at 305,000 people, according to the un refugee agency (unhcr).

over 131,000 south sudanese refugees arrived in sudan in 2016. the majority of the 2016 influx arrived in east darfur (49 per cent) and white nile (25 per cent). over 85,000 refugees crossed into sudan in the first six months of 2016, with the largest numbers observed from february to april, with another upsurge in july, according to unhcr. over 65% of the refugees are children, with many of them arriving with critical levels of malnutrition.

unhcr and partners anticipate the continued arrival of south sudanese refugees into sudan throughout 2017, given the situation in south sudan marked by localised fighting and critical levels of food insecurity in areas close to the sudanese border. the planning figure for 2017 is an estimated 60,000 additional refugees, with the corresponding response outlined in the south sudan regional refugee response plan for 2017. unhcr in sudan is currently updating its preparedness and contingency plan in consultation with partners to ensure an effective response continues if influxes exceed the current planning figure.


Information

source: un high commissioner for refugees
country: ukraine

as temperatures fall below minus 20 celsius, winterization support for eastern ukraine is not adequate to help vulnerable residents cope with the conditions caused by the conflict.

a handful of older people who stayed behind struggle to keep warm in the harsh winter after conflict drove out younger residents.

by: inna varenytsia in luhanske, ukraine | 16 february 2017 the village of luhanske, on the front line in eastern ukraine, looks abandoned during the day. only smoke from some of the chimneys shows that people still live there. just a handful of elderly residents brave the shelling and the severe cold to call luhanske their home.

anna tadyka, 68, showed us around the small kitchen where she spent the whole of last winter. “when it got freezing cold here, i sealed all the doors, put a mattress on the floor near the stove and burst into tears sitting on it,” she said.

as ukraine enters the coldest months of january and february, with temperatures often falling below minus 20 degrees celsius, winterization support for eastern ukraine is not adequate to help vulnerable residents cope with the conditions caused by the conflict.

“i saved some money and bought coal,” anna said. “it lasted me one month. but it was of bad quality. it’s like dust!” as she throws coal into the stove, a layer of black dust covers her face.

anna cannot afford to heat every room in her big house, where she lives alone. coal for the whole winter season costs about us $400. her annual pension is less than us$600. even if she managed to save more money to buy more coal, it would be difficult to have it delivered to a village on the front line. the road to luhanske is damaged and hazardous, and coal distributors avoid the area. because of the shortage of fuel and money to pay for it, residents started gathering firewood on the outskirts of the village last summer.

nadezhda rudenok, 66, said they felled trees and spent the summer hauling them to the village. she bought one carload of firewood. “i had thought it wouldn’t last, but then we received some coal as humanitarian aid,” she said.

gathering firewood is highly dangerous, since it often conceals unexploded ordnance which can explode if disturbed.

resident nina zus took home some firewood from the field. she put it into the stove and when she cooked dinner, there was an explosion that injured her arm. since then, she has not used firewood for fuel.

in early january, nina received coal from the ngo proliska, a local partner of the un refugee agency unhcr. two hundred luhanske residents will receive support under the scheme. pablo mateu, unhcr representative in ukraine, said they were trying to reach people who had no money. “because of fighting and the state of the roads, they do not have the basics to survive through this winter,” he said. “there were many communities with people spending nights in the basement or living out in the cold.”

it was difficult for humanitarian agencies to reach them because of the dynamics of the conflict, he added.

since the heavy fighting in luhanske in december, people are fearful of being caught up in the shelling when they are out of doors. when unhcr’s coal truck reached the village, residents, who range in age from 50 to 80, helped each other to unload the coal sacks quickly.

halyna samokhvalova, 79, said she found living alone a challenge. her daughter died 13 years ago and she has no any relatives with whom she could move in away from the conflict zone. she relies on her neighbour victor, 64.

“in essence, ours is a street of old people,” said victor. “after the shelling, the young people left the village.” he is one of the youngest people on the street and helps his more elderly neighbours get through the day.

“every morning i ask halyna if she needs anything, how she feels today. i can bring her some food, like sausage or bread.” victor said he twice helped her replace windows broken by the shelling. the windows of his own house were also damaged several times, but he decided to board them up. “i will wait to repair them when the war ends,” he said.


Information

source: un mission in south sudan
country: south sudan, uganda

uganda’s commissioner for refugees, apollo kazungu, says his office is aware of the precarious situation and is working to settle the arrivals and improve their living conditions.

patricia okoed/filip andersson

the refugee office in uganda says it has been receiving an influx of up to 4,000 south sudanese refugees every day for the past one week. apollo kazungu, the commissioner for refugees in the office of the prime minister in uganda, says the new arrivals are mainly women and children coming from kajo-keji.

the refugees are being registered at a transit site for settlement in palorinya camp in moyo district. radio miraya spoke with two ladies from kajo-keji, who both report dire conditions at the transit site, mentioning a lack of basic necessities ranging from food, water and shelter to toilets and medicines.

uganda’s commissioner for refugees, apollo kazungu, says his office is aware of the precarious situation and is working to settle the arrivals and improve their living conditions and future prospects, for example by vaccinating children against preventable diseases. most of the refugees, he says, are women and children, many of them traumatized and carrying lots of belongings, which may indicate that they are “not about to return”.


Information

source: world health organization
country: iraq

responding to a shortage of medical supplies in the newly retaken areas of mosul, the who made deliveries to 16 primary health centers, one hospital and the directorate of health in ninewa.

erbil 15 february 2017 - the world health organization (who) has responded to an acute shortage of medical supplies in the newly retaken areas of mosul by delivering medicines and other medical supplies to 16 primary health centers, one hospital and the directorate of health (doh) in ninewa. the donation will support treatment of patients with infectious diseases, chronic conditions, diarrheal diseases and trauma cases who have been deprived of medical care.

the supplies, part of which are an in-kind donation from the government of norway, consist of medical equipment, medications, 4 full interagency emergency health kits, 96 basic emergency health kits, 10 surgical kits and one full interagency diarrheal disease kits and are sufficient to treat 200,000 patients.

with the bigger part of east mosul now accessible and with free health care, health facilities are receiving an influx of patients, these essential medicines will allow replenishment of phc stocks that will enable health workers continue providing medical care to people who urgently need them. this will also assist health facilities to function at all times with adequate amount of supplies with assured quality.

to enhance its support in newly accessible parts of iraq, who has prepositioned emergency medical supplies in erbil and baghdad to support the ministry of health swiftly respond to the needs and gaps faced by health facilities and health partners.

who and the directorates of health are closely monitoring health events including shortages of medicines and other medical supplies in east mosul and will work with the moh to ensure continuum in the delivery of primary health care services for host communities and displaced persons.

over the coming weeks, who will work with the ministry of health to establish three additional field hospitals in strategic areas in response to west mosul operations to ensure access to and availability of trauma care services. who, in support of health partners, is also working to establish several trauma stabilization points in the southern side of mosul to ensure triage, stabilization and referral of complicated trauma cases to the nearest specialized hospitals.

in light of the humanitarian situation in the country, particularly in mosul and other surrounding districts, who is appealing for us$ 65 million to support health interventions until the end of 2017 out of which us$ 14 million (21%) has been received leaving a funding gap of 79%.

for more information, please contact:
ajyal sultany, communications officer, who iraq
mobile: +974 7510101469; [email protected]

pauline ajello, communication officer, who iraq
mobile: +964 751 010 1460; [email protected]


Information

source: world food programme
country: world

the guidance provides an overview of the gvb key issues in the context of wfp’s operations. it helps staff and partners to identify and respond to gbv risks related to hunger, nutrition and wfp programmes.

about this manual

what is it?

this manual provides an overview of the key issues related to gender-based violence (gbv) in the context of wfp’s operations. it seeks to guide staff and partners so they can better identify and respond to gbv risks related to hunger and nutrition and to wfp programmes.

in particular, the guidance aims to identify practical steps to ensure that wfp staff are able to:

  • understand what gbv means;

  • understand how gbv is relevant to wfp;

  • conduct gbv analysis in order to identify gbv-related threats, vulnerabilities, capacities, gaps and opportunities;

  • apply specific measures to prevent, mitigate and respond to gbv threats within the context of wfp’s activities;

  • identify opportunities to address gbv through food assistance, thereby achieving a dual objective of food security and protection;

  • monitor gbv risks in the operational context;

  • refer gbv survivors to appropriate service providers in a safe and ethical way; and

  • manage gbv case reporting in a safe and ethical way.

who is it for?

this guidance is intended to reach all wfp staff and partners. it is especially important for those who are involved in one or more steps of wfp’s programme cycle, including managers, programme officers and field monitors.

how should it be used?

the guidance should be used as a reference tool for integrating gbv as a protection concern into wfp operations. it does not provide a comprehensive overview of all types of gbv risks. rather, it serves to guide staff through the process of identifying relevant gbv risks in their operational country context. it is ultimately up to wfp staff to determine how to adapt and apply the guidance to their situation. this guidance should be reviewed before planning, implementing and monitoring programmes and field activities.

structure

the guidance is divided into the following sections:

part 1 introducing gbv introduces the broader concept of gbv, explains wfp’s approach to gbv, and provides the policy framework for gbv as a protection concern for wfp.

part 2 incorporating gbv in wfp operations outlines how to conduct a gbv analysis, explains incorporation of gbv in the programme cycle and provides a generic gbv risk analysis for each modality and programme type.

part 3 addressing gbv incidents through referrals outlines the process by which wfp staff should refer protection and gbv incidents that go beyond their expertise or capacity to respond; and

part 4 advocacy, partnerships and coordination explains gbv advocacy, introduces key actors and partners in gbv, and highlights key interagency monitoring and reporting mechanisms.


Information

source: un high commissioner for refugees
country: iraq

in anticipation of the next phase of the battle for mosul, humanitarian agencies and the government are preparing a new site to provide shelter for more than 40,000 families by the end of march.

with a new phase in the mosul offensive poised to begin, iraq’s humanitarian co-ordinator, lise grande, toured unhcr’s hasansham u3 displacement camp and the government-built khazer m1 camp, east of mosul, where unhcr has also provided support and distributed emergency items.

more than 82,000 people have been provided with shelter and emergency items in unhcr-supported camps to the east of mosul since the start of the offensive in october. humanitarian agencies, working with the iraqi government, are preparing for a new outflow of civilians from western mosul. construction work is beginning at a new site south of mosul to provide additional shelters. only a small number of families from densely-populated western mosul have managed to escape and are staying in displacement camps, including hasansham and khazer.

unhcr has completed seven camps, including hasansham u3, and two more are under construction. the agency is currently able to provide some 11,000 families (66,000 people) with shelter as part of the mosul response, a figure which should expand to 20,000 families (120,000 individuals) in the near-term once land is allocated. by the end of march, it is anticipated that the government of iraq and humanitarian partners would have built camps and emergency sites to potentially host 41,155 families (246,930 people) in camps and emergency sites.

“we anticipate the next phase in the battle for mosul will be an even bigger test for the humanitarian community”, said unhcr’s representative in iraq, bruno geddo, who was visiting the displacement camps along with iraq’s humanitarian co-ordinator. “we are preparing for the worst, but hoping for the best.”

some 153,894 people remain displaced, having fled from mosul and surrounding areas since october 17. at the same time, more than 46,000 people from mosul and surrounding areas have returned to their places of origin, eager to return home and rebuild their lives.

however, some returnee families also have gone back to the camps due to insecurity and a lack of basic services in their areas of origin. ms. grande stressed that returns should be safe, dignified and voluntary. “you cannot force people to go home. people have to make that choice on their own. they have the right to decide”, she said.

for more information please contact:

caroline gluck [email protected] +9647809207286 @carogluck
andreas needham [email protected] +9647809207282 @andreasneedham


Information

source: un office of the high commissioner for human rights
country: world

the appeal is the most ambitious to date as the work of the office is "dramatically and chronically underfunded," the high commissioner zeid ra’ad al hussein said.

un human rights office launches usd 253m funding appeal – most ambitious to date

zeid urges greater funding for human rights to bolster stability in an uncertain world

geneva (15 february 2017) – the un human rights office today launched its most ambitious funding appeal yet, urging states and private donors to bolster the office’s ability to work and stand up for human rights for all people, everywhere.

“our world has entered a period of profound uncertainty. in numerous countries, even the rules are under attack - xenophobia and calls for racial and religious discrimination have entered mainstream discourse and every day, seemingly, are more widespread and more deeply rooted,” un high commissioner for human rights zeid ra’ad al hussein said. “a collective failure to prevent, minimize and resolve conflicts and proxy wars is feeding brutal extremist groups and creating wave upon wave of the most shocking human suffering, including forcing millions of people to flee their homes and everything they have ever known.”

“this is cause for grave alarm – but not dejection. it is a cry not to despair but to action. and, it is evidence of the pressing need for broad based compassion, stability and inclusive development that human rights underpin. investment in human rights today makes for prevention tomorrow – prevention of escalating violations and of the shattering impacts of conflict. human rights upheld returns stability to entire countries and regions by advancing justice for all.”

the un human rights office, through some 60 field presences and through partnerships with other international and local organizations worldwide, works to ensure that human rights principles have a real impact on the lives of people.

“through human rights advocacy, advice on laws and constitutions, training of state authorities as well as of non-governmental organizations, fact-finding and hard-hitting investigations that lay the groundwork for accountability and amplify the voices of victims of human rights violations – through these and other means, the un human rights office helps in the push for better human rights protections for all,” zeid said.

“more than ever, we need strong partners to stand with us. my office is dramatically and chronically underfunded. we need to broaden our financial support base to include more member states, and encourage participation from a much broader range of private donors.”

the un human rights office is this year seeking usd 252.9 million in extra-budgetary funding for its 2017 programme of work, including in-country assistance, support to un independent human rights experts and the un human rights council, as well as a number of trust funds to support work on issues such as torture, contemporary forms of slavery and the rights of indigenous peoples. this extra-budgetary funding would be in addition to the un regular budget funding of usd 107.56 million provided to the un human rights office.

“with your support, we can help to prevent human rights crises from escalating. we can advocate a broad, open democratic space and impartial rule of law institutions in every country. we can contribute to sound governance of migration and continue to advance the 2030 agenda for sustainable development agenda. we can push back against the current assaults on values, and act swiftly to uphold the human rights laws and principles we fought so hard to build,” the high commissioner said.

“more and more people are suddenly realizing we can no longer afford to be complacent about human rights, and that the erosion of other people’s human rights will sooner or later lead to the erosion of our own,” zeid added.

“the time to stand up for human rights is now. we are counting on your support.”

ends

watch our annual appeal video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buj0au-plhe

stand up for someone’s rights today: http://www.standup4humanrights.org/en/

see the un human rights office’s annual appeal 2017 here (in english): http://www.ohchr.org/documents/aboutus/unhumanrightsappeal2017.pdf

https://donatenow.ohchr.org/

for more information and media requests, please contact: rupert colville (+41 22 917 9767 / [email protected]) or ravina shamdasani (+41 22 917 9169 / [email protected]) or liz throssell (+41 22 917 9466 / [email protected])

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Information

source: world food programme, logistics cluster
country: world

the purpose of the guide is to ensure that staff deployed in ongoing operations have an overview of the basic im guidelines, standards and procedures at global and field levels.

introduction

the process of managing information encompasses a series of actions made up of technical and non-technical tasks. the process is a continuous cycle of actions, which involves understanding information needs, collecting and analysing relevant data to produce information that gives knowledge of the situation. this allows for the most relevant product to be produced, according to audience and context, and for sharing the information and maintaining the information flow.
as the cluster approach was adopted to address and correct the problems of ad-hoc humanitarian responses, the logistics sector has adopted a reliable, predictable and standardised approach to coordination. standards exist at global level to ensure that organisations working with the logistics cluster in any operation find the same type of information, accessible in the same way and following the same guidelines, notwithstanding the peculiarity of each emergency and the specific requirements of each operation.
the purpose of this guide is to ensure that im officers deployed in ongoing logistics cluster operations and skilled personnel likely to be deployed have an overview of the basic im guidelines, standards and procedures at global and field level.
the guide addresses how to share critical operational information through standard logistics cluster im products. it also gives an overview on best practices for taking photos, using social media (facebook, twitter, blog posts) and writing communication pieces to increase awareness of the logistics cluster and its activities.
finally, it provides brief guidance on the reporting requirements for wfp and ocha.
in addition, the guide outlines filing criteria to ensure effective access to information for all relevant people as well as efficient handover, and writing standards, to ensure quality and consistency across operations and products.
this guide is a live document that requires your input and revision.


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: somalia

humanitarian community requests a total of us$825 million for the first half of 2017 to reach 5.5 million people with life-saving assistance and livelihood support.

situation overview

the humanitarian situation in somalia is rapidly deteriorating and famine is a strong possibility in 2017.
this comes only six years after a devastating famine led to the death of more than a quarter of a million people – half of them children. the severe drought is a result of two consecutive seasons of poor rainfall, more in some areas. in the worst affected areas, large-scale crop failure and high levels of livestock deaths are occurring. malnutrition and drought-related diseases are on the rise, so are displacements, including to ethiopia. increasing competition for resources such as water is already increasing local tensions and could trigger further inter-communal conflict. over 6.2 million people-half the population-are in need of humanitarian assistance. the situation of children of somalia is particularly grave.

a large scale-up of the drought response in february and march can help prevent the worst-case humanitarian scenario and save lives and livelihoods. this will also help preserve important gains made in recent years. a total of us$825 million is requested for the first half of 2017 to reach 5.5 million people with life-saving assistance and livelihood support.

a drought – even one this severe – does not automatically lead to a catastrophe if humanitarian partners respond early enough with timely support from the international community.

there are significant differences and opportunities today, compared to the 2011 famine, including a more engaged donor community, closely following the situation on the ground. ngos and un agencies have a better footprint now than in 2011, allowing for a more granular analysis of the situation and enabling better targeted scale-up. there are systems in place for rapid scale-up of cash based programming, systems which were only starting up back in 2011. enhanced engagement with local actors and improved coordination with the federal government and state-level authorities has helped ensure a more joined up reading of the situation, allowing partners to increasingly be on the same page in terms of scope and scale of the crisis, and enhancing accountability. stronger partnership with the organization of islamic cooperation and muslim charities allows for better coordination and collaboration across various aid streams. improved engagement with local ngos and enhanced risk management systems have helped ensure greater efficiency and more accountable spending of resources.

building on lessons learned from the 2011 famine, this operational plan outlines the main needs, gaps and plans for response by humanitarian partners in the first half of 2017 to prevent a famine. it is based on the worst-case scenario given that even if the gu rains are better than foreseen, the crisis is already at a point where much of the damage has been done.

of the $825 million required for the first half of 2017 to reach 5.5 million people with life-saving assistance and livelihood support, $35 million have already been contributed by donors, hereof $18 million from the central emergency response fund and $14 million channeled through the somalia humanitarian fund. these requirements reflect an increase in operational requirements which will lead to an associated increase in the somalia humanitarian response plan.


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: somalia

a total of us$825 million is requested for the first half of 2017 to reach 5.5 million people with life-saving assistance and livelihood support, so as to prevent the worst-case scenario.

situation overview

the humanitarian situation in somalia is rapidly deteriorating and famine is a strong possibility in 2017.
this comes only six years after a devastating famine led to the death of more than a quarter of a million people – half of them children. the severe drought is a result of two consecutive seasons of poor rainfall, more in some areas. in the worst affected areas, large-scale crop failure and high levels of livestock deaths are occurring. malnutrition and drought-related diseases are on the rise, so are displacements, including to ethiopia. increasing competition for resources such as water is already increasing local tensions and could trigger further inter-communal conflict. over 6.2 million people-half the population-are in need of humanitarian assistance. the situation of children of somalia is particularly grave.

a large scale-up of the drought response in february and march can help prevent the worst-case humanitarian scenario and save lives and livelihoods. this will also help preserve important gains made in recent years. a total of us$825 million is requested for the first half of 2017 to reach 5.5 million people with life-saving assistance and livelihood support.

a drought – even one this severe – does not automatically lead to a catastrophe if humanitarian partners respond early enough with timely support from the international community.

there are significant differences and opportunities today, compared to the 2011 famine, including a more engaged donor community, closely following the situation on the ground. ngos and un agencies have a better footprint now than in 2011, allowing for a more granular analysis of the situation and enabling better targeted scale-up. there are systems in place for rapid scale-up of cash based programming, systems which were only starting up back in 2011. enhanced engagement with local actors and improved coordination with the federal government and state-level authorities has helped ensure a more joined up reading of the situation, allowing partners to increasingly be on the same page in terms of scope and scale of the crisis, and enhancing accountability. stronger partnership with the organization of islamic cooperation and muslim charities allows for better coordination and collaboration across various aid streams. improved engagement with local ngos and enhanced risk management systems have helped ensure greater efficiency and more accountable spending of resources.

building on lessons learned from the 2011 famine, this operational plan outlines the main needs, gaps and plans for response by humanitarian partners in the first half of 2017 to prevent a famine. it is based on the worst-case scenario given that even if the gu rains are better than foreseen, the crisis is already at a point where much of the damage has been done.

of the $825 million required for the first half of 2017 to reach 5.5 million people with life-saving assistance and livelihood support, $35 million have already been contributed by donors, hereof $18 million from the central emergency response fund and $14 million channeled through the somalia humanitarian fund. these requirements reflect an increase in operational requirements which will lead to an associated increase in the somalia humanitarian response plan.


Information

source: international federation of red cross and red crescent societies
country: mozambique

tropical cyclone dineo made landfall in southern mozambique on 15 february 2017. urban flooding in villages and cities may affect more than 200,000 people over the next 7 days.

a. situation analysis

description of the disaster

tropical cyclone dineo made landfall near inhambane, southern mozambique on 15 february 2017, bringing with it strong winds exceeding 100km/hr, rough sea and torrential rain, according to mtotec (satellite imagery, surface analysis, and storm system information for the south west indian ocean cyclone basin), the storm evolved from severe tropical storm to category iii1 tropical cyclone and reclassified as ex-dineo. despite this weakening trend, the south african weather service (saws) projects that ex-dineo still pose a great risk until 18 february as exceptionally high rainfall, strong winds, and resultant flooding is expected.

initial reports indicated that inhambane province was the most affected, other areas included vilankulo, massinga, murrombene, maxixe, and jangamo districts as well as inhambane city. although the situation is still evolving, preliminary report of 16 february 2017, indicated 3 deaths and four injured, damaged infrastructure (electricity, and roads) as a result of the storm in the affected areas.

the national institute for disaster management (ingc) projects that, urban flooding in small villages and cities may affect 200,000 people over the next 7 days and the following river basins is at risk of flooding.


Information

source: international federation of red cross and red crescent societies
country: mozambique

tropical cyclone dineo made landfall in southern mozambique on 15 february 2017. urban flooding in villages and cities may affect more than 200,000 people over the next seven days.

a. situation analysis

description of the disaster

tropical cyclone dineo made landfall near inhambane, southern mozambique on 15 february 2017, bringing with it strong winds exceeding 100km/hr, rough sea and torrential rain, according to mtotec (satellite imagery, surface analysis, and storm system information for the south west indian ocean cyclone basin), the storm evolved from severe tropical storm to category iii1 tropical cyclone and reclassified as ex-dineo. despite this weakening trend, the south african weather service (saws) projects that ex-dineo still pose a great risk until 18 february as exceptionally high rainfall, strong winds, and resultant flooding is expected.

initial reports indicated that inhambane province was the most affected, other areas included vilankulo, massinga, murrombene, maxixe, and jangamo districts as well as inhambane city. although the situation is still evolving, preliminary report of 16 february 2017, indicated 3 deaths and four injured, damaged infrastructure (electricity, and roads) as a result of the storm in the affected areas.

the national institute for disaster management (ingc) projects that, urban flooding in small villages and cities may affect 200,000 people over the next 7 days and the following river basins is at risk of flooding.


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: iraq

humanitarian agencies are rushing to prepare for the humanitarian impact of the military campaign. emergency sites are being constructed and stocks of life-saving supplies are being pre-positioned.

(baghdad, 18 february 2017): with military operations to retake western mosul beginning, humanitarian organizations are warning that tens of thousands of families are at extreme risk. recent surveys with key informants confirm that food and fuel supplies are dwindling, markets and shops have closed, running water is scarce and electricity in many neighborhoods is either intermittent or cut off.

“the situation is distressing. people, right now, are in trouble. we are hearing reports of parents struggling to feed their children and to heat their homes,” said lise grande, humanitarian coordinator for iraq. “the battle hasn’t started but already there is a humanitarian crisis.”

the un estimates that between 750,000 and 800,000 civilians are resident in the western section of the city. few, if any commercial supplies have reached mosul during the past three months after the main road to syria was cut-off. informants report that nearly half of all food shops have closed. bakeries throughout the area have run out of fuel and many can no longer afford to purchase costly flour. prices of kerosene and cooking gas have skyrocketed and many of the most destitute families are burning wood, furniture, plastic or garbage for cooking and heating.

“children and their families are starting to face critical shortages of safe drinking water,” said peter hawkins, unicef representative in iraq. “three out of five people now depend on untreated water from wells for cooking and drinking as water systems and treatment plants have been damaged by fighting or run out of chlorine.”

“food prices in western mosul are almost double than in eastern mosul,” said sally haydock, representative of the world food programme in iraq. “we are extremely concerned that many families do not have enough to eat in western mosul.”

humanitarian agencies are rushing to prepare for the humanitarian impact of the military campaign. emergency sites are being constructed south of the city and stocks of life-saving supplies are being pre-positioned for the 250,000 – 400,000 civilians who may flee.

“we don’t know what will happen during the military campaign but we have to be ready for all scenarios. tens of thousands of people may flee or be forced to leave the city. hundreds of thousands of civilians might be trapped—maybe for weeks, maybe for months,” said ms. grande. “protecting civilians is the highest priority in a situation like this—nothing is more important.”

for further information, please contact:

damian rance, communications officer, un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs in iraq, ([email protected] / +964 (0)751 740 3858


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: south sudan, sudan

over 65% of the 131,000 refugees who arrived in 2016 were children, many with critical levels of malnutrition. unhcr and partners anticipate the continued influx of refugees throughout 2017.

highlights

  • about 80,000 people returned to umm dukhun locality, central darfur between 2014 and 2016.

  • returnees in um dukhun have poor access to basic services—such as water, education, health and nutrition services.

  • over 300,000 south sudanese refugees have arrived in sudan since mid-december 2013.

  • wfp provided food assistance to 3.9 million people across sudan in 2016.

figures 2016 hrp

/# people in need in sudan (2016 hno) 5.8 million

/# people in need in darfur (2016 hno) 3.3 million

gam caseload 2.1 million

south sudanese refugee arrivals in sudan - since 15 dec 2013 (registered by unhcr) - as of 10 feb 2016: 305,000

refugees of other nationalities (registered by unhcr) - as of 31 oct 2016: 140,626

funding

568.4 million us$ received in 2016

59% reported funding (as of 12 february 2017)

about 80,000 people returned to umm dukhun locality, central darfur, between 2014 and 2016
from 18 to 25 january, an inter-agency team from the government of sudan, un and national and international ngos visited 10 return villages in umm dukhun locality in central darfur. the mission assessed the needs and verified numbers of returnees and host communities in garaaya, baltebei, salale, sereif, um jakaw, magan, elsinan, soreah and moraya villages.

umm dukhun locality has experienced two waves of civilian displacement, the first in 2003 and the second in 2013, following clashes between the salamat and misseriya tribes. people mostly fled to refugee camps and settlements in chad, as well as within umm dukhun locality and to other states in sudan.

according to international organization for migration’s (iom), 80,387 people have returned to their areas of origin in umm dukhun locality between 2014 and 2016, the largest number of returns in sudan to any given locality during that period.

reasons given by people returning from chad include reduction of humanitarian assistance in chad, the change in the school curriculum, restriction of movement within chad as well as improved security in umm dukhun locality.

according to the mission findings, returnees have poor access to basic services such as water, education, health and nutrition services. returnees also lost their possessions when they fled and return without many belongings and lack income-generating and other livelihood opportunities necessary for effective reintegration in their village. settlements are scattered within umm dukhun, posing a further challenge for the provision of services. in addition, to reduce tensions among/between communities, peace-building and reconciliation interventions are needed.

over 300,000 south sudanese refugees in sudan
the number of south sudanese refugees in sudan since december 2013 has surpassed the 300,000 mark and as of 13 february and stands at 305,000 people, according to the un refugee agency (unhcr).

over 131,000 south sudanese refugees arrived in sudan in 2016. the majority of the 2016 influx arrived in east darfur (49 per cent) and white nile (25 per cent). over 85,000 refugees crossed into sudan in the first six months of 2016, with the largest numbers observed from february to april, with another upsurge in july, according to unhcr. over 65% of the refugees are children, with many of them arriving with critical levels of malnutrition.

unhcr and partners anticipate the continued arrival of south sudanese refugees into sudan throughout 2017, given the situation in south sudan marked by localised fighting and critical levels of food insecurity in areas close to the sudanese border. the planning figure for 2017 is an estimated 60,000 additional refugees, with the corresponding response outlined in the south sudan regional refugee response plan for 2017. unhcr in sudan is currently updating its preparedness and contingency plan in consultation with partners to ensure an effective response continues if influxes exceed the current planning figure.


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: iraq

with fighting in western part of the city now starting, humanitarian partners are racing against the clock to prepare emergency sites south of mosul to receive displaced families.

(baghdad, 19 february 2017): since fighting began on 17 october 2016, more than 217,000 people have been displaced from the eastern sections of mosul; already, 57,000 people have returned to their neighbourhoods. at least 550,000 civilians remained in their homes during the fighting. humanitarian partners have been active in re-taken accessible areas since mid-october, reaching more than 850,000 people with some form of assistance.

“humanitarian partners are delivering aid to all people impacted by the crisis in mosul. with fighting in western part of the city now starting, we are racing against the clock to prepare emergency sites south of mosul to receive displaced families. we are also doing everything possible to continue providing assistance and support to vulnerable families in the re-taken eastern neighborhoods and to people living in displaced camps,” said humanitarian coordinator for iraq, lise grande.

“the humanitarian operation is already stretched. we are trying to reach more than six million people across iraq who need help. we don’t have all of the funding we need and many partners are facing major capacity constraints,” said ms. grande.

“we are doing everything we can to reach and help people. mosul is an enormous operation. each day, partners are trucking 2.3 million litres of water to nearly half of all re-taken neighborhoods, supplementing municipal supplies,” said ms. grande. “front-line partners have delivered emergency packages of food, water and essential supplies to 878,000 people since mosul aid operations began in mid-october.”

although un missions to neighbourhoods in eastern mosul were postponed last week due to security considerations, front-line partners were able to continue delivering assistance. “un humanitarian agencies will resume their missions to eastern mosul starting today”, said ms. grande. “families are in need and we need to be there to help them.”

for further information, please contact:
damian rance, communications officer, un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs in iraq, ([email protected] / +964 (0)751 740 3858)


Information

source: human rights watch
country: iraq

although accounts of gender-based violence have emerged from isis controlled-areas, these are the first cases against sunni arab women in iraq that hrw has documented.

describe forced marriage, rape

(baghdad) – fighters from the islamic state (also known as isis) are arbitrarily detaining, ill-treating, torturing, and forcibly marrying sunni arab women and girls in areas under their control in iraq, human rights watch said today.

although accounts of gender-based violence have emerged from areas under isis control, these are the first cases against sunni arab women in iraq that human rights watch has been able to document. researchers interviewed six women in kirkuk, to which they had escaped from the town of hawija, 125 kilometers south of mosul and still under isis control. human rights watch and others have extensively documented similar abuses by isis fighters against yezidi women.

“little is known about sexual abuse against sunni arab women living under isis rule,” said lama fakih, deputy middle east director at human rights watch. “we hope that the international community and local authorities will do all they can to give this group of victims the support they need.”

in january 2017, human rights watch interviewed four women who said they had been detained by isis in 2016, for periods between three days and a month. another woman said an isis fighter, her cousin, forced her to marry him and then raped her. a sixth woman said that isis fighters destroyed her home as punishment after her husband escaped isis and tried to forcibly marry her. five of the six women said that isis fighters beat them.

one woman said that in april 2016, she tried to escape hawija with her three children and a large group of other families. isis fighters captured the group and held 50 of the women from the group in an abandoned house. the woman said that over the next month, one fighter raped her daily in front of her children. she suspected that many of the other women held with her were also being raped.

experts from four international organizations, including two medical organizations, working with survivors of sexual assault in northern iraq told human rights watch it is difficult to assess the prevalence of isis’ gender-based violence against women who have fled territory under their control. they said that victims and their families remain silent to avoid stigmatization and harm to the woman or girl’s reputation.

one foreign aid worker said she had seen cases mostly of forced marriage and rape, but she believed that very few of the victims in the displaced communities she works with have come forward. she said some women try to hide the incident from their own families out of fear they will be stigmatized or punished by their relatives or community. babies born of rape or forced marriage may also face stigma, she said. their long-term psychosocial support and medical treatment are particular concerns, she said. another aid provider for an international organization providing services at three camps for people displaced from isis-controlled territory said their staff had documented 50 cases of women and girls who suffered psychological and physical violence at the hands of isis and to whom the organization was providing support.

several local and international organizations are providing support to victims of gender-based violence. however, not enough is being done to tackle the stigma around sexual violence, and there is a lack of awareness about appropriate services and psychosocial or mental health support, medical professionals and service providers in kirkuk said. available services continue to be outstripped by needs, they said.

a psychiatrist at an international organization providing psychosocial support in one of the larger displaced people’s camps in the kurdistan region of iraq said that too little has been done to inform men about how to support female victims of gender-based violence. she said that very often, male relatives will forbid women from getting counseling and vocational training, even if the women want the services.

the women interviewed are all patients at the kirkuk center, where a staff of 12 provides psychological and behavioral counseling to women and children. dr. abd al-karim kalyfa, who runs the center, said in january that the center was at that time treating 30 patients, 15 of them children, suffering from trauma related to their experiences living under isis. in 2016, he said, his center treated about 400 patients who had come from isis-held territory. isis fighters had raped at least two of his current patients, he said. he knew of one other organization in the kirkuk area providing services to victims of sexual assault but said there was far too little support available to provide needed mental health care to displaced people who had lived under isis.

another medical professional in kirkuk who is providing social support to women and children who have been traumatized by their experience under isis said that services provided by the federal government focus on pharmacological treatment, not on psychosocial therapy and counseling.

a program manager at an international organization providing services in one of the larger displaced people’s camps in northern iraq said that the group has been able to create effective safe spaces and start vocational projects for women. but it has not yet been able to provide more long-term psychosocial support and other services for survivors of gender-based violence, because it is struggling to find female staff with the needed language skills, experience, and professional qualifications.

the kurdistan regional government (krg), together with united nations agencies and other international humanitarian groups, have struggled to provide the survivors of violence against yezidi women who escaped isis with post-rape care and psychosocial support.

providing adequate mental health care and psychosocial support is a complex and long-term challenge. the krg government, iraqi central government, un agencies, and others involved need to put in place a coordinated response, based on an assessment of the needs and the most pressing priorities. the groups should identify key barriers to making care and services accessible, available, and voluntary, and determine the potential cost. such coordination efforts should include the world health organization (who) and representatives of the survivors.

who has said that mental health services and psychosocial support are essential components of comprehensive care for survivors of sexual violence. it has also stated that people with mental health conditions and their communities should help develop these services and that those responsible for providing services should strengthen existing resources and make them available in a nondiscriminatory fashion to all.

“isis victims of gender-based violence suffer the consequences of their abuse long after they have managed to escape.” fakih said. “their care and rehabilitation requires a multifaceted response, with authorities providing the needed medical and psychosocial support and working to stamp out stigma around sexual violence within the wider community.”

all interviews were conducted with full and informed consent, in arabic without translation. we took measures to respect the privacy of survivors and conducted interviews in as private a setting as possible. in all cases, human rights watch took steps to minimize re-traumatization of survivors, stopping interviews if they caused distress. in order to protect victims and witnesses, individual names and other identifying information have been modified or withheld.

suad
suad, 21, is from a village near hawija. she said that her cousin, who is one year older than her, joined isis when its fighters took over the city in 2014. their families had intended that they marry, but once he became an isis fighter, suad said, she and her parents informed him that they no longer wanted the union to take place. but on a morning in january 2016, he arrived at her home with his brother and cousin and demanded that suad marry him or he would kill her parents. her family acquiesced to this threat, and her cousin took her to his home where he forced her to marry him and raped her. she became pregnant. after eight months, suad said, she escaped in the middle of the night and fled with her parents to kirkuk. she gave birth a month later, but the baby boy died four days later, she said.

fawzia
fawzia, 45, is from daquq but was living in hawija when, in early 2015, isis fighters approached her husband and asked him to act as a spy in their neighborhood. he refused and was detained for 10 days beginning on february 7, 2016, in a village outside the city, escaping immediately after he was released. fawzia said that three isis fighters occupied her house for three days during this period, put her two children under house arrest, and forced them to stay in one room. she said that she saw isis fighters bring a different girl each day to the adjacent room for about an hour. she said she was able to see the girls when the door to her room was open. she estimated that they were about 16 and said she heard them crying through the wall. she believed the fighters had sexually assaulted the girls.

after the three days, fawzia said she told the fighters to stop bringing girls to her house. one of them hit her with his hand and the butt of his gun, and said that their leader would come and marry her. they also warned her that if she tried to escape to kirkuk, isis operatives in the city would find and kill her. on the fourth morning, during the 5 a.m. prayer, when all the isis fighters were at the local mosque, fawzia fled with her children to kirkuk. she broke down into tears as she completed her story:

when i arrived at the first peshmerga checkpoint, i was so scared that they [isis] would find out i had escaped that i didn’t register myself. i am so scared here in kirkuk that i have spent the last year staying inside my relatives’ house. i don’t even leave to go to the store, and if i must leave, i spend the whole time looking over my shoulder. they might know where i live and come kill me.

mariam
mariam, 25, said that in march 2016, her husband fled hawija, fearing possible execution because he was a former policeman. three days later, she said, about 20 isis fighters found her at home with her daughter and dragged them outside, hitting her head and shoulders. the isis fighters blew up her home, forcing her to watch as punishment for her husband’s escape. she moved in with her brother-in-law, she said, but within a few days two isis fighters arrived and told her she was an apostate because her husband fled, but that she was still young and had to marry one of them. she agreed, telling them to come the following day, and went into hiding that night. over the next three months, mariam said, she moved repeatedly. she unsuccessfully tried to escape the area three times but finally fled with her 3-year-old daughter to kirkuk.

hanan
hanan, 26, said she tried to escape from hawija on april 21, 2016, with her children and about 50 women and four men from several sunni families. her husband had fled several weeks earlier. she said isis fighters arrested the group in qayyarah, 65 kilometers north, and took them to an abandoned house, where they locked the women and their children in a room. on the first day, hanan said, an isis guard took her and her daughter, 8, and sons, 6 and 3, to a separate room. isis fighters told her she was an apostate because her husband had fled isis-controlled territory and that she needed to remarry the local isis leader. she said, “kill me, because i refuse to do that.”

the fighters blindfolded her, beat her with plastic cables, and suspended her by her arms for some time – she could not estimate how long – in front of her children. then they took her down, took off the blindfold, and one of the fighters raped her in front of her children:

the same guy raped me every day for the next month without a blindfold, always in front of my children. my daughter suffers from an intellectual disability so she doesn’t really understand what she saw, but my older son brings it up often. i don’t know what to do.

she said that the other women were taken out of the communal room, sometimes daily, other times less often, and that one of them, from hajj ali who had an 11-month-old daughter, had told her that another fighter was raping her and that he was going to force her to marry him. she suspected that all the other women were being raped as well.

a month after she was captured, hanan’s father was able to locate her and gave isis a car and paid us$500 for her release, she said. he was forced to sign a document stating that if she escaped isis-controlled territory, he would be killed. the isis fighter who had been raping her said he wanted to marry her, but she and her father refused, she said. in january 2017, she said, she escaped with the rest of her family to kirkuk. she said she did not know what happened to the other women, but heard from the woman from hajj ali’s family that she had been forced to marry her rapist.

karima
karima, 17, said she fled hawija toward kirkuk with 16 family members in june 2016. as they left hawija, an isis sniper shot her mother in the neck, killing her. most of her family members escaped but isis fighters captured karima and her brothers, ages 6, 11, and 13, and held them in an abandoned home near hawija without food and with very little water. they were interrogated about their father, a former iraqi policeman who was able to flee earlier. her captors hit her and her 13-year-old brother once each with a gun butt to the shoulder during an interrogation, she said. after three days, they were released and escaped to kirkuk.

aisha
aisha, 25, said she tried to escape hawija in october 2016 with her family and two other families. while they were waiting for smugglers to show them a safe route, she said, isis fighters appeared and opened fire on them, shooting her 6-year-old son in his back. she said that the men in the group escaped, but the isis fighters rounded up all five women, hitting aisha with gun butt on her shoulder. the isis fighters took her son to a hawija hospital and locked up the women in a room in an abandoned house about a 30-minute drive away.

she said that three female isis guards came and lashed each woman 65 times with a thin cane, saying that if they even winced, they would get more lashes. aisha said isis held her for 12 days and was only released after her family paid about us$2,000. the other women were still there, and she does not know what happened to them.

she rushed to the hospital and found her son, who had survived four operations, and finally escaped kirkuk with her son. she showed human rights watch her son’s wounds. 


Information

source: world food programme, un children's fund, food and agriculture organization of the united nations
country: south sudan

war and a collapsing economy have left 100,000 people facing starvation in parts of south sudan where famine was declared today. another one million people are classified as being on the brink of famine.

un agencies warn that almost 5 million people urgently need food, agriculture and nutrition assistance

20 february 2017, juba - war and a collapsing economy have left some 100,000 people facing starvation in parts of south sudan where famine was declared today, three un agencies warned. a further 1 million people are classified as being on the brink of famine.

the food and agriculture organization of the united nations (fao), the united nations children's fund (unicef) and the world food programme (wfp) also warned that urgent action is needed to prevent more people from dying of hunger. if sustained and adequate assistance is delivered urgently, the hunger situation can be improved in the coming months and further suffering mitigated.

the total number of food insecure people is expected to rise to 5.5 million at the height of the lean season in july if nothing is done to curb the severity and spread of the food crisis.

according to the integrated food security phase classification (ipc) update released today by the government, the three agencies and other humanitarian partners, 4.9 million people - more than 40 percent of south sudan's population - are in need of urgent food, agriculture and nutrition assistance.

humanitarian access urgently needed

unimpeded humanitarian access to everyone facing famine, or at risk of famine, is urgently needed to reverse the escalating catastrophe, the un agencies urged. further spread of famine can only be prevented if humanitarian assistance is scaled up and reaches the most vulnerable.

famine is currently affecting parts of unity state in the northern-central part of the country. a formal famine declaration means people have already started dying of hunger. the situation is the worst hunger catastrophe since fighting erupted more than three years ago.

"famine has become a tragic reality in parts of south sudan and our worst fears have been realised. many families have exhausted every means they have to survive," said fao representative in south sudan serge tissot. "the people are predominantly farmers and war has disrupted agriculture. they've lost their livestock, even their farming tools. for months there has been a total reliance on whatever plants they can find and fish they can catch."

malnutrition is a major public health emergency, exacerbated by the widespread fighting, displacement, poor access to health services and low coverage of sanitation facilities. the ipc report estimates that 14 of the 23 assessed counties have global acute malnutrition (gam) at or above the emergency threshold of 15 percent, with some areas as high as 42 percent.

"more than one million children are currently estimated to be acutely malnourished across south sudan; over a quarter of a million children are already severely malnourished. if we do not reach these children with urgent aid many of them will die," said jeremy hopkins, unicef representative a.i in south sudan. "we urge all parties to allow humanitarian organizations unrestricted access to the affected populations, so we can assist the most vulnerable and prevent yet another humanitarian catastrophe."

man-made crisis

"this famine is man-made. wfp and the entire humanitarian community have been trying with all our might to avoid this catastrophe, mounting a humanitarian response of a scale that quite frankly would have seemed impossible three years ago. but we have also warned that there is only so much that humanitarian assistance can achieve in the absence of meaningful peace and security, both for relief workers and the crisis-affected people they serve," said wfp country director joyce luma. "we will continue doing everything we possibly can to hold off and reverse the spread of famine."

across the country, three years of conflict have severely undermined crop production and rural livelihoods. the upsurge in violence since july 2016 has further devastated food production, including in previously stable areas. soaring inflation - up to 800 percent year-on-year - and market failure have also hit areas that traditionally rely on markets to meet food needs. urban populations are also struggling to cope with massive price rises on basic food items.

massive relief operation

fao, unicef and wfp, with other partners, have conducted massive relief operations since the conflict began, and intensified those efforts throughout 2016 to mitigate the worst effects of the humanitarian crisis. in northern bahr el ghazal state, among others, the ipc assessment team found that humanitarian relief had lessened the risk of famine there.

fao has provided emergency livelihood kits to more than 2.3 million people to help them fish or plant vegetables. fao has also vaccinated more than 6 million livestock such as goats and sheep to prevent further loss.

wfp continues to scale up its support in south sudan as humanitarian needs increase, and plans to provide food and nutrition assistance to 4.1 million people through the hunger season in south sudan this year. this includes lifesaving emergency food, cash and nutrition assistance for people displaced and affected by conflict, as well as community-based recovery or resilience programs and school meals.

in 2016, wfp reached a record 4 million people in south sudan with food assistance - including cash assistance amounting to us$13.8 million, and more than 265,000 metric tons of food and nutrition supplies. it is the largest number of people assisted by wfp in south sudan since independence, despite problems resulting from the challenging context.

unicef aims to treat 207,000 children for severe acute malnutrition in 2017. working with over 40 partners and in close collaboration with wfp, unicef is supporting 620 outpatient therapeutic programme sites and about 50 inpatient therapeutic sites across the country to provide children with urgently needed treatment. through a rapid response mechanism carried out jointly with wfp, unicef continues to reach communities in the most remote locations. these rapid response missions treat thousands of children for malnutrition as well as provide them with immunization services, safe water and sanitation which also prevents recurring malnutrition.

contact
lieke visser
fao juba
(+211) 922 001 661
[email protected]

zoie jones
fao rome
(+39) 06 570 56309
[email protected]

marianna zaichykova
unicef juba
(+211) 95 685 9134
[email protected]

james elder
unicef nairobi
(+254) 715 581 222
[email protected]

george fominyen
wfp juba
(+211) 922 465 247
[email protected]

challiss mcdonough wfp nairobi (+254) 707 722 104 [email protected]


Information

source: world food programme, un high commissioner for refugees
country: burkina faso, burundi, cameroon, chad, djibouti, ethiopia, kenya, mauritania, somalia, south sudan, sudan, uganda, world

the two agency heads warn that food shortages will have dire consequences on the health and protection of 5 million vulnerable people, unless more support is urgently made available.

the executive director of the world food programme (wfp), ertharin cousin and the un high commissioner for refugees, filippo grandi, are very concerned that critical shortages in food assistance are affecting some 2 million refugees in 10 countries across africa.

the shortages could worsen in coming months without new resources to meet food needs.

the number of refugees in africa nearly doubled from 2.6 million in 2011 to nearly 5 million in 2016. while donor funding for refugee assistance increased during this period, it did not keep pace with rapidly rising needs. as a result, the humanitarian response is significantly underfunded. this has forced cuts in food assistance for some groups of refugees.

the two agency heads warn that food shortages will have dire consequences on the health and protection of such vulnerable people, unless more support is urgently made available.

“we can’t imagine how difficult life is for thousands of refugee families with no food, and often denied the possibility to work or provide for themselves in other ways. refugees are extraordinarily resilient, but cuts in food assistance – sometimes as high as 50 percent – are having a devastating impact on the health and nutrition of thousands of families,” said unhcr’s grandi. “the right to food is a basic human right. we are working with wfp to ensure that no refugee goes to sleep hungry, but support has to come quickly.”

“millions of refugees depend on wfp food and our work to treat and prevent malnutrition to stay alive. but in africa they are in danger of being overshadowed by large humanitarian crises elsewhere,” said cousin. “donors have been very generous facing unprecedented global needs. but no refugee deserves to be abandoned and left behind.”

unhcr and wfp recognize the very concerning food security and nutrition situation in the horn of africa and the unprecedented needs for assistance. individuals are fleeing somalia and south sudan and arriving as refugees in critical condition. over 75 percent of the somali refugee children who have arrived in dollo ado in ethiopia since january were acutely malnourished.

ten refugee operations in africa have experienced cuts affecting the quantity and quality of food assistance for approximately 2 million refugees. food rations have been dramatically cut – in some cases by up to 50 percent – in large operations including cameroon, chad, kenya, mauritania, south sudan and uganda.

refugees in burkina faso, djibouti, burundi and ethiopia have had specific commodities cut including micronutrient fortified blended foods, needed to ensure an adequate quality diet.

unhcr and wfp are concerned that sustained cuts to food assistance will have severe nutrition and protection-related consequences as refugees try to cope by skipping meals, pulling their children out of schools to stay at home or work and selling family assets.

the nutritional situation of these refugees before the cuts to food assistance was already worrying and is now worsening. nutrition surveys in 2016 documented high levels of acute malnutrition, anaemia and stunting. in many refugee sites in ethiopia, chad, sudan and djibouti acute malnutrition is ‘critical’ and anaemia is greater than 40 percent, indicating a public health crisis.

for more information please contact:

challiss mcdonough, wfp/nairobi, tel. +254 207 622 179, mob. +254 707 722 104.
email: [email protected]

cecile pouilly, unhcr. mob. +41 79 108 26 25. email: [email protected]

leo dobbs, unhcr. mob. +41 79 883 63 47. email: [email protected]

jane howard, wfp/rome, tel. +39 06 651 323 21, mob. +39 346 760 05 21.
email: [email protected]

gregory barrow, wfp/london, tel. +44 20 724 090 01, mob. +44 7968 008 474.
email: [email protected]

bettina luescher, wfp/geneva, tel. +41 22 917 8564, mob. + 41 79 842 8057.
email: [email protected]

gerald bourke, wfp/new york, tel. +1 646 556 69 09, mob. +1 646 525 9982.
email: [email protected]


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: bangladesh, indonesia, myanmar, new zealand, philippines

as of 19 february, over 30,700 people remain displaced in northeastern mindanao (caraga region) by flooding. at least 2,100 people are in 18 shelters, while most are staying with relatives.

philippines

as of 19 february, over 30,700 people remain displaced in northeastern mindanao (caraga region) by flooding triggered by a series of weather systems since 8 january. at least 2,100 people are in 18 shelters, while most are staying with relatives and friends. local authorities and ngos, with support from the department of social welfare and development (dswd) are providing food and other relief items.

as of 16 february, eight deaths and 202 injuries were confirmed as a result of the 6.7 magnitude earthquake that struck surigao city on 10 february. about 7,800 people remain displaced, of which 370 people are in tents on the capitol grounds in surigao city while the rest are camping on their properties or staying with relatives or friends. access to potable water has been restored to nearly all of the affected areas. dswd and the red cross have been providing psychosocial services in addition to relief goods. as aftershocks continue, regional disaster management authorities remain on red alert status, due to the heightened risk of landslides. there has been no request for international assistance.

indonesia

over the past week, torrential rains were reported in many major cities on java island causing temporary flooding. while bnpb reported no casualties, at least 14,700 people were displaced between 15 and 16 february in jakarta, bekasi and brebes. on 15 february, a localized whirlwind also hit sidoarjo district (east java) and damaged 175 houses. local governments provided basic relief assistance with the support of provincial authorities

bangladesh

as of 20 february, an estimated 73,000 people have crossed from rakhine state (myanmar) into bangladesh since october 2016. they are residing in registered camps and makeshift settlements in cox’s bazar, and in teknaf and ukhiya host villages.
over the last few weeks, there has been a decrease in the number of the new arrivals, although some cross border movements continue to be observed.
new families have been reported in balukhali, teknaf and ukhiya host villages. from 20 to 23 february, the un special rapporteur on the situation of human rights in myanmar is on mission to bangladesh.

new zealand

during the past week, bushfires across south island caused one death and triggered the evacuation of over 1,000 people, according to local media. the fires destroyed at least 11 houses in christchurch and selwyn and caused power disruptions. as of 16 february, a state of local emergency has been declared for christchurch city and selwyn district. the situation is considered to be within the national capacity to respond.


Information

source: un mission in colombia
country: colombia

the un mission in colombia is verifying the operation as more former fighters and their families arrive in designated zones on "historic" day for the country's peace process.

bogotá, colombia, 19 february 2017 - around 300 men and women arrived on 18 february at the zone of agua bonita, in the department of caquetá, central colombia, where the un mission will verify the laying down of arms. this movement completes the arrival of around 6,900 farc-ep men and women, some of them pregnant or with small children, to begin their transition to civilian life.

in the past 19 days they rode cars, buses, boats or walked around 8.700km through 36 routes across the country, accompanied by over 860 women and men from the tripartite monitoring and verification mechanism (mvm)—with the government, the farc-ep and coordinated by the un mission in colombia—working in close coordination with the public forces.

one of those newly arrived to the agua bonita zone is 10-month old pancho, whose mother joined the farc-ep a few years ago. his father is also part of the farc-ep’s third front and the family will be living together at the camp, for which the government will provide logistics, and where the un mission will have permanent presence to verify the laying down of arms.

“the un mission in colombia and the mvm consider that the farc-ep’s decision to move into the zones—in spite of the limited logistics in the majority of them—is very positive,” said general javier pérez aquino, head of the un mission observers and mvm coordinator, calling this day “historic”.

“this decision considerably reduces the possibility of armed contact (…) and we also hope that their presence will accelerate the construction works in these camps, creating the appropriate conditions to continue with the process that will lead to their reinsertion into the social, economic and political life,” he added.

pérez aquino explained to journalists in the department of caquetá that in spite of the need to finalize the logistics around the camps, the deadline for the completion of the laying down of arms remains, 180 days after the final agreement came into force on 1 december.

at the bogotá office as well as eight regional and 26 local sites, farc-ep and government members work together on a daily basis, verifying the parties’ commitments towards the ceasefire and cessation of hostilities, along with 350 un mission observers from 16 countries, most of them from the community of latin american and caribbean states, and also from great britain, norway, portugal, spain and sweden.

esperanza fajardo, 45, said she joined the farc-ep in the 90’s, escaping the killings of left-wing unión patriotica political affiliates. today she works hand in hand with government and un mission counterparts. “we work together to implement the final agreement and i feel hopeful that this process will lead to a country with more social justice.”

her government counterpart, mayor alejandro cruz, has a huge scar across his chest. “i was injured twice in combat against the farc-ep,” he explains. “i feel very committed to this process because i want our children and grandchildren to live in a conflict-free country.”

the tripartite mechanism’s coordinator, general pérez aquino, hailed the mvm members’ hard work and commitment to the peace process, accompanying the farc-ep movement and continuing the ceasefire and cessation of hostilities verification. he added that for this process to be effective other aspects of the final agreement need to consolidate, such as the logistical support, security and social and economic conditions that will enable the transition to civilian life and lead to a sustainable peace.


Information

source: un office of the high commissioner for human rights
country: democratic republic of the congo

zeid ra’ad al hussein urges the government to take immediate steps to halt widespread human rights violations, including apparent summary executions, by the country’s armed forces.

geneva (20 february 2017) - un high commissioner for human rights zeid ra’ad al hussein has called on the government of the democratic republic of the congo to take immediate steps to halt widespread human rights violations, including apparent summary executions, by the country’s armed forces.

“there are multiple, credible allegations of massive human rights violations in kasai, kasai central, kasai oriental and lomami provinces, amid a sharp deterioration in security situation there, including people being targeted by soldiers for their alleged affiliation with a local militia,” said zeid.

“it is time to stop a blunt military response that does nothing to tackle the root causes of the conflict between the government and local militias but instead targets civilians on the basis of their presumed links to the militias,” the high commissioner stressed.

“in line with its international human rights obligations, the drc government must ensure that its security forces, including the police and the army, respect and protect life and only resort to firearms as a last resort when faced with an imminent threat to life or of serious injury,” zeid said.

a local militia linked to a customary chief, kamuina nsapu, who was killed by the drc armed forces in august 2016 has been increasingly active in kasai central province, mostly attacking government buildings and churches. the militia also reportedly recruits and uses children.

horrific video footage emerged over the weekend apparently showing fardc soldiers shooting repeatedly and without warning at men and women, who purportedly belonged to the kamiuna nsapu militia, in muenza nsapu village. the alleged troops fired at point blank range at unarmed victims as they lay bleeding on the ground.

the un peacekeeping mission, monusco, is not in a position to verify the origin and authenticity of the video. however, the drc government spokesperson and minister of communication lambert mende has stated that fardc officers are under judicial investigation for their behavior during recent fighting in the village.

“the drc authorities must pursue an independent, impartial, prompt, effective and transparent investigation to shed light on what has been happening and to ensure those responsible are held fully to account for what appears to be use of excessive and disproportionate force, and, in some cases, deadly force,” the high commissioner stressed.

the un joint human rights office (monusco/ohchr) has been monitoring the kamuina nsapu situation closely over several months and has documented a recent flare-up in violence in kasai central province. the office (unjhro) received reports that some 50 people were killed by troops between 6 and 8 february, and a further 101 people were reported killed in confrontations with soldiers between 9 and 13 february. overall, the unjhro has documented the killings of more than 280 individuals since july 2016 in the context of this violence.

the unjhro is liaising closely with the judicial authorities, including through sharing the findings of the different missions deployed in the area, to ensure that investigations are opened into reported violations by the fardc and the militias.

“the drc has long been afflicted by serious violence but amid a worrying escalation of violence in provinces considered relatively calm, i call again on the government to redouble its efforts to tackle impunity that feeds further violence and human rights violations,” said the high commissioner.

“i urge the authorities to put into place a comprehensive peace plan based on dialogue, including finding durable solutions to conflicts with customary chiefs,” zeid said.

the high commissioner called on the human rights council and the international community to monitor the security situation in the drc, including any progress made by the authorities in investigating, prosecuting and punishing these crimes.

ends

for more information and media requests, please contact liz throssell (141 22 917 9466 /[email protected])


Information

source: coalition "justice for peace in donbas"
country: ukraine

due to the harsh social-economic situation in eastern ukraine, women are forced to offer sex for survival or in exchange for protection and they have become especially vulnerable to human trafficking.

context

gender-based violence (“gbv”) is a violation of human rights and a form of discrimination against one of the sexes. it includes all acts of violence based on gender which result or may result in physical, sexual, psychological or economic harm or suffering of either males or females. it includes threats to commit such acts of coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, regardless of whether it happens in public or in private life.

gbv is prohibited not only by national law, but also by international human rights law, international criminal law and international humanitarian law. in particular, the rome statute recognizes gbv as a crime under international criminal law. rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, enforced sterilization, or any other form of sexual violence of comparable gravity are serious violations of the laws and customs applicable to armed conflicts and can be classified as war crimes. it is acknowledged that the level of gbv is heightened during the armed conflict due to a breakdown of law and order as well as polarization of gender roles. not surprisingly, the vast majority of gbv cases were recorded during the intense fighting in eastern ukraine.

as a result of the legal vacuum created after the outbreak of the conflict, no one was safeguarded from gross human rights violations both on the territories under effective control of the russian military, mercenaries and illegal armed groups, as well as under the control of ukrainian army and volunteer battalions.

motivated by their own vision and understanding of law and order, in an environment of impunity, pro-russian armed groups which exercise effective control over the situation established their own systems of power relations.

the rule of law was replaced by the rule of force. even though to a lesser degree, the same concern applies also to territories under governmental control. hence, in 2014-2015 the level of unlawful violence (including gbv) in the conflict zone was exceptionally high for the region.

during the monitoring of the situation of illegal detention facilities in eastern ukraine, we observed that there are facts of different forms of gbv in every 3rd interview. even though the gravity of violence is appalling, it remains underreported and neglected by the authorities. noticeably, according to the information provided by the main directorate of the national police in donetsk region no cases of gbv were documented in regards to the females and males, who were released from illegal detention facilities. thus, the gender-sensitive conflict analysis conducted by the east-ukrainian center for civic initiatives and its partners in the frame of work of the coalition “justice for peace in donbas” aimed at providing a more comprehensive understanding of the conflict, its impact, dynamics and structural problems that need to be addressed.


Information

source: un children's fund
country: central african republic, chad, democratic republic of the congo, nigeria, south sudan, world, yemen

exact data on the number of children recruited are difficult to confirm. unicef estimates that tens of thousands under the age of 18 are used in conflicts worldwide.

new york/paris, 21 february 2017 – at least 65,000 children have been released from armed forces and armed groups in the past 10 years, unicef said today as leaders from around the world gather in paris on the anniversary of the paris commitments to end the use of children in conflict.

“ten years ago the world made a commitment to the children of war and matched it with action – action that has helped give 65,000 children a new chance for a better life,” said unicef executive director anthony lake. “but today’s meeting is not only about looking back at what has been accomplished — but looking forward to the work that remains to be done to support the children of war.”

exact data on the number of children used and recruited in armed conflict are difficult to confirm because of the unlawful nature of child recruitment. however, unicef estimates that tens of thousands of boys and girls under the age of 18 are used in conflicts worldwide:

  • since 2013, an estimated 17,000 children have been recruited in south sudan and up to 10,000 have been recruited in the central african republic.

  • in nigeria and neighbouring countries, data verified by the united nations and its partners indicate that nearly 2,000 children were recruited by boko haram in 2016 alone.

  • in yemen, the un has documented nearly 1,500 cases of child recruitment since the conflict escalated in march 2015.

the number of countries that have endorsed the paris commitments nearly doubled in 10 years, from 58 countries in 2007 to 105 at present, signaling an increasing global commitment to end the use of children in conflict.

estimates show that of the 65,000 children who have been released in the past 10 years, more than 20,000 were in the democratic republic of the congo, nearly 9,000 in the central african republic, and over 1,600 children in chad.

the paris international ministerial conference on the protection of children in armed conflicts will look at ways to build on this momentum. these include calling for the unconditional release of all children, without exception, and putting an end to child recruitment; increased resources to help reintegrate and educate children who have been released; and urgent action to protect internally displaced children, child refugees and migrants.

“as long as children are still affected by the fighting, we cannot give up the fight for the children,” lake said.

###

note to editors:

adopted 10 years ago, the paris commitments and the paris principles and guidelines lay out guidance for protecting children from recruitment and use by armed forces or armed groups, and assisting their release and reintegration, with other vulnerable children affected by armed conflict in their communities.

about unicef

unicef promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do. together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere. for more information about unicef and its work visit: www.unicef.org

###

for further information and for interview requests, please contact:

najwa mekki, unicef new york, +1917 209 1804, [email protected]

maud saheb, unicef france, +33 6 83 99 05 67, [email protected]


Information

source: un children's fund
country: nigeria, somalia, south sudan, yemen

unicef is working with partners to provide therapeutic treatment to severely malnourished children in nigeria, south sudan, somalia and yemen.

new york/dakar/nairobi/amman, 21 february 2017 – almost 1.4 million children are at imminent risk of death from severe acute malnutrition this year, as famine looms in nigeria, somalia, south sudan and yemen, unicef said today.

“time is running out for more than a million children,” said unicef executive director anthony lake. “we can still save many lives. the severe malnutrition and looming famine are largely man-made. our common humanity demands faster action. we must not repeat the tragedy of the 2011 famine in the horn of africa.”

in northeast nigeria, the number of children with severe acute malnutrition is expected to reach 450,000 this year in the conflict-affected states of adamawa, borno and yobi. fews net, the famine early warning system that monitors food insecurity, said late last year that famine likely occurred in some previously inaccessible areas of borno states, and that it is likely ongoing, and will continue, in other areas which remain beyond humanitarian reach.

in somalia, drought conditions are threatening an already fragile population battered by decades of conflict. almost half the population, or 6.2 million people, are facing acute food insecurity and in need of humanitarian assistance. some 185,000 children are expected to suffer from severe acute malnutrition this year, however this figure is expected to rise to 270,000 in the next few months.

in south sudan, a country reeling from conflict, poverty and insecurity, over 270,000 children are severely malnourished. famine has just recently been declared in parts of unity state in the northern central part of the country, where 20,000 children live. the total number of food insecure people across the country is expected to rise from 4.9 million to 5.5 million at the height of the lean season in july if nothing is done to curb the severity and spread of the food crisis.

and in yemen, where a conflict has been raging for the past two years, 462,000 children are currently suffering from severe acute malnutrition – a nearly 200 per cent increase since 2014.

this year, unicef is working with partners to provide therapeutic treatment to 220,000 severely malnourished children in nigeria, over 200,000 severely malnourished children in south sudan, more than 200,000 severely malnourished children in somalia, and 320,000 children in yemen.

###

about unicef

unicef promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do. together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere.

for more information about unicef and its work for children, visit www.unicef.org. follow unicef on twitter and facebook

for more information, please contact:

najwa mekki, unicef new york, +1917 209 1804, [email protected]

patrick rose, unicef regional office in dakar, +234 70 6418 4023, [email protected]

james elder, unicef regional office in nairobi, +254 71558 1222, [email protected]

tamara kummer, unicef regional office in amman, +962 797 588 550, [email protected]


Information

source: world health organization
country: yemen

a nationwide polio immunization campaign in yemen, launched by national health authorities with support from who and unicef, aims to immunize 5,019,648 children under-five.

sana'a, 20 february 2017—a nationwide polio immunization campaign was launched today in yemen by national health authorities with support from who and unicef, aiming to immunize 5 019 648 children under the age of 5.

more than 40 000 health workers are taking part in the 3-day campaign. in addition, religious and local council’s officials, as well as health educators are also mobilizing support for the campaign. high-risk groups, such as internally displaced persons (idps) and refugees, will also be reached.

“who is working closely with unicef and health authorities to keep yemen polio-free. the threat of virus importation is serious and this campaign aims to curb any possible return of the virus to yemen,” said dr nevio zagaria, who acting representative in yemen.

“who and its partners will continue to support the health authorities in increasing the vaccination coverage across yemen.”

this is the first polio immunization campaign since april 2016. the security situation in yemen has limited accessibility of many parts of the country, leaving many children at risk of vaccine preventable diseases.

as the nearly 2-year-old armed conflict in yemen has been posing threats to the expanded programme on immunization (epi), who has supported the programme to keep polio vaccines safe through providing fuel, generators and solar-powered refrigerators to ensure the functionality of vaccine storage as well as cold chain transferring them from the war-torn areas into safer places.

"despite huge security challenges, who is committed to supporting polio immunization campaigns and all activities of the epi to maintain the polio-free status achieved by the country in 2006" said dr zagaria.

media contacts:
tarik jasarevic
media relations
world health organization
mobile: +41 793 676 214

e-mail: [email protected]


Information

source: un high commissioner for refugees
country: iraq

it is estimated that up to 250,000 people could be displaced. almost 217,000 people have fled hostilities since 17 october, of whom around 160,000 are still displaced.

this is a summary of what was said by unhcr spokesperson – to whom quoted text may be attributed – at today's press briefing at the palais des nations in geneva.

with the new military operations under way in mosul, unhcr, the un refugee agency, is focusing efforts on camp construction to shelter many of those who could be displaced by the renewed fighting.

it’s estimated that up to 250,000 people could be displaced. almost 217,000 people have fled hostilities since 17 october, of whom around 160,000 are still displaced. others have returned to their homes in newly-retaken areas. but the situation remains fluid and terrifying for those trapped or affected by the fighting.

unhcr has eight camps open or completed at present, and one under construction. we are planning for the start of work at another site (hamam al alil), south of mosul. currently there is spare capacity in three existing camps to the east of mosul (hasansham u3, khazer m1 and m2), with space for 12,700 more people. an additional 1,000 plots are planned for khazer m2. there are also spaces for 14,400 people in unhcr’s newly-built chamakor camp, where 500 tents have already been pitched.

the government of iraq has decided, initially, to transport people displaced from western mosul to camps in the east while new capacity is being added in the south. unhcr has been asked to support a new government site at hamam al-alil, 20 km south of mosul. it is expected that many of those fleeing western mosul will reach hamam al-alil on foot. this site will shelter for up to 60,000 people. one camp at the site will be unhcr built. another, which has been built by the government, for 24,000 people, will be unhcr-supported.

with the predicted exodus of up to a quarter of a million people, it will be impossible to accommodate such large numbers on existing land. we have identified other land that could be used as camps once frontlines shift.

meantime, conditions in the densely-populated west of the city are worsening, according to reports and testimonies, and hence concerns are mounting for the well-being of civilians. there are shortages of food, water, fuel and medicine. half of all food shops have closed and most people can only access untreated water. food prices are rocketing and there are reports of families burning furniture, clothing and plastic to stay warm. conditions will deteriorate if civilians are not able to flee the fighting. during the battle for eastern mosul, the protection of civilians was prioritized in military planning and activities, and unhcr hopes this principle will continue to be upheld. however, the new battle will be different. the city’s west is densely populated, with many narrow streets, and fighting will be street by street. armed groups have built a network of tunnels.

insecurity and recent suicide attacks in eastern mosul have resulted in some families – who had opted to return to their homes – coming back to the camps in search of safety.

for more information on this topic, please contact:
in geneva, matthew saltmarsh, [email protected], +41 79 217 31 40
in iraq, caroline gluck, [email protected], +964 780 920 7286


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: yemen

increased fighting along the western coast and greater restrictions of life-saving commodities, including food staples, into al hudaydah port are aggravating an already terrible humanitarian situation in yemen.

sana'a, 21 february 2017

sana'a, 21 february 2017 i am deeply concerned with the escalation of conflict and militarization of yemen’s western coast. it is coming at a great cost to civilians.

increased fighting along the western coast which is effectively limiting the flow of life-saving commodities, including food staples, into al hudaydah port is aggravating an already terrible humanitarian situation in yemen. over 17 million people are currently unable to adequately feed themselves and are frequently forced to skip meals - women and girls eat the least and last. seven million yeminis do not know where their next meal will come from and are ever closer to starvation.

for almost two months, conflict has escalated from the ground, air and sea in the dhubab and al mukha areas in taizz governorate. scores of civilians have been either killed or forced to flee from their homes. airstrikes have destroyed or damaged critical roads and bridges across al hudaydah governorate. unexploded rockets have also landed inside the al hudaydah port, reducing even further the number of ships and imports. only a limited number of shipping companies now use the port, with vessels being forced to redirect their shipments, including humanitarian supplies, to aden.
yet, the aden port does not have the required capacity or infrastructure to accommodate yemen’s import demands. furthermore, the transport of goods from aden to the rest of the country is not guaranteed given the additional costs, blocked or damaged roads, lack of fuel, and ongoing conflict.

the availability of food in markets and the food pipeline are at imminent risk. we are witnessing food shortages, rising food and fuel prices, disruptions to agricultural production, and plummeting purchasing power, especially brought about by the lack of salary payments in the public sector for over six months. given that the country is 80-90 per cent dependent on imported food staples; i am compelled to raise the alarm. if left unabated, these factors combined could accelerate the onset of famine.

humanitarian partners are working hard to prevent the suffering of hundreds of thousands of children from crippling malnutrition, which could stunt a generation if not confronted now. close to half a million children are prioritized for assistance; a nearly 200 per cent increase since 2014. yet, despite all the efforts, humanitarians cannot replace a functioning commercial sector.

the inhumanity of using the economy or food as a means to wage war is unacceptable and is against international humanitarian law. i urgently call on all parties to the conflict and on those that have influence over the parties to facilitate the rapid entry of critical life-saving food staples into all yemeni ports; to refrain from or not contribute to the damage and destruction of critical infrastructure required to transport food staples throughout the country; and to find or support a way to pay public sector salaries so that the needy can purchase what is available.

the best means to prevent famine in yemen is for weapons to fall silent across the country and for the parties to the conflict to return to the negotiating table. the international community must also assume its responsibility and provide the needed funds to enable a timely and principled humanitarian response. the people of yemen are counting on it.

for further information, please contact:
george khoury, head of ocha yemen, [email protected], tel +967 712 222 207 zaid al alayaa, information officer ocha yemen, [email protected], tel. +967 2222 835 jessica j. jordan, head of communication (oic), [email protected], tel. +962 79867 4617 ocha press releases are available at www.unocha.org or www.reliefweb.int


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: ethiopia

the cerf funds will immediately provide water and health, nutritional and agricultural services. the funds will help pastoralist communities in the somali region, who are most in need.

new york, 21 february 2017 - with the horn of africa facing one of the worst droughts in decades, more than 5.6 million people in ethiopia alone are in desperate need of life’s basic necessities. to provide time-critical aid to more than 785,000 people suffering from hunger, malnutrition and severe water shortages in ethiopia’s worst-hit somali region, emergency relief coordinator and under-secretary-general for humanitarian affairs stephen o’brien has released us$18.5 million from the un’s central emergency response fund (cerf).

“i was recently in ethiopia’s somali region, where i saw the devastating impact this drought is having on people’s lives, livestock and livelihoods. we must act today,” said mr. o’brien. “time lost means lives lost so i am releasing cerf funding to provide urgent aid to people in need – now – when they need it most.”

the cerf funds will immediately provide affected people with access to water and health, nutritional and agricultural services. the funds will help pastoralist communities in the somali region, who are most in need, and thousands of whom have been forced to move in search of water and pasture.

the current drought has hit ethiopia before the country could recover from the effects of a devastating el niño-induced drought in 2015 and 2016 which left more than 10 million people in urgent need of aid in 2016. while the government and humanitarian partners implemented a remarkably effective response with generous donor support last year, millions of vulnerable ethiopians are still facing prolonged drought.

“the cerf grant covers only a small portion of what is required in 2017 to address the rising hunger and malnutrition levels,” said mr. o’brien. “humanitarians will use these funds to save lives, but it is a bridge that must be matched and surpassed urgently. millions of people’s lives, livelihoods and wellbeing depend on continued donor support.”

over the past two years, cerf has allocated a total of $47 million to aid operations in ethiopia.

around the globe, the ever-increasing scale and intensity of emergencies points to the need for a larger cerf to keep pace with the growing needs. to this end, the un general assembly in december 2016 endorsed former secretary-general ban ki-moon’s recommendation to double cerf’s annual target to $1 billion by 2018. member states and partners are urged to contribute to the fund so that more lives can be saved.

for further information, please contact:
claudia hargarten, un cerf: [email protected], tel. +1-917-207-3925


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: nigeria

as relief organizations increase response to the humanitarian emergency in the north-east of nigeria, more support is required to sustain life-saving assistance to millions devastated by boko haram-linked violence.

maiduguri/abuja, 21 february 2017: as relief organizations increase response to the humanitarian emergency in the north-east of nigeria, timely donor support is required to sustain life-saving assistance to millions people devastated by boko haram-linked violence.

the eight-year long conflict has left some 8.5 million people in need of humanitarian assistance in the worst-affected states of nigeria’s north-east. in the coming months, around 5.1 million people will face severe food insecurity in the region, where some 1.8 million people have been displaced and millions are exposed to violence and abuse.

“we are requesting for only a little over us$1 billion. if the resources do not arrive in time, one in five children suffering sever acute malnutrition could die. the likelihood of a child with severe acute malnutrition surviving is nine times less than a properly nourished child,” said peter lundberg, the deputy humanitarian coordinator for nigeria.

“food assistance alone will cost $1 million a day to avoid famine in a region where 450,000 children under five will suffer from severe acute malnutrition this year,” said lundberg. “sustained and timely financial support is needed to maintain the scale-up in operations desperately needed in the north-east of nigeria.”

during a recent visit by representatives of 12 donor countries and agencies to borno state, in the run up to the 24 february humanitarian conference on nigeria and lake chad region, they lauded the scale-up of humanitarian operations in the north-east and emphasized the need for more funding, a stance the humanitarian community in nigeria concurs with.

“we are grateful to our donors who have enabled us scale up the response and appreciate their continued commitment. we look forward to receiving the needed resources to implement the 2017 humanitarian response plan for nigeria,” lundberg said.


Information

source: thomson reuters foundation
country: world

drones filled with food, water or medicine could be indispensable in humanitarian emergencies by delivering live-saving supplies to remote areas hit by natural disasters or conflict.

edible drones filled with food, water or medicine could soon become indispensable in humanitarian emergencies

by magdalena mis

london, feb 20 (thomson reuters foundation) - edible drones filled with food, water or medicine could soon become indispensable in humanitarian emergencies by delivering live-saving supplies to remote areas hit by natural disasters or conflict, their designers said on monday.

with 50 kg (110 lb) of food stocked inside its compartments, each drone costing 150 pounds ($187) would be able to deliver enough supplies to feed up to 50 people per day, they said.

the frame of the prototype version of the drone - called pouncer - is made of wood but the designers are planning to use edible materials in the next version.

"food can be component to build things," nigel gifford, an ex-army catering officer and founder of uk-based windhorse aerospace, the company behind the design, told the thomson reuters foundation.

"you fly (the drone) and then eat it," he said in a phone interview.

with up to 40 km (25 miles) reach, the drone can be launched from an aircraft or catapulted from the ground with an accuracy of about 7 metres (23 ft), giving it an advantage over air drops - often used as a last resort in emergencies.

"in combat zones like we have in aleppo or mosul nothing will work except what we have," gifford said.

"with parachuted air drops the problem is you can't guarantee where the loads will land.

"in aleppo we could have put aid straight into some of the streets and we could have done that out of the sight of isis (islamic state)."

parts of the 3 metre (10 ft) by 1.5 metre (5 ft) drone, designed by the team behind facebook's solar-powered internet drone aquila, can be used as fuel or shelter.

the windhorse team includes bruce dickinson, entrepreneur and lead singer of the heavy metal band iron maiden and a former airbus executive, andrew morgan.

gifford said several humanitarian agencies, including medical charity medecins sans frontieres (msf), international rescue committee, oxfam and the world health organization, have already expressed their interest in using the drone.

in december windhorse presented the pouncer to britain's aid minister priti patel, hoping to attract help with financing.

"we're waiting to hear back from them," gifford said.

he said the pouncer would undergo initial testing in may and should be ready to be deployed on its first mission by the end of the year. ($1 = 0.8020 pounds) (reporting by magdalena mis @magdalenamis1, editing by ros russell; please credit the thomson reuters foundation, the charitable arm of thomson reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights, climate change and resilience. visit http://news.trust.org)

see graphic of aid delivery scenarios for pouncer drone here


Information

source: international crisis group
country: cameroon, chad, niger, nigeria

the region hosts hundreds of thousands of refugees and idps fleeing boko haram violence, adding to the burdens of an already impoverished host population.

the plight of refugees and the internally displaced from the boko haram conflict in cameroon’s far north is adding to the many burdens of an already impoverished population

cameroon has been fighting the boko haram jihadist group in its far north region for the last three years. the conflict has killed nearly 1,600 people in cameroon alone and has led to a humanitarian crisis in what was already one of the country’s most impoverished and least-educated regions. as donors and experts convene on 24 february at the oslo humanitarian conference on nigeria and the lake chad basin, the international community must find ways to improve overcrowded refugee camps and mitigate growing problems for the local population.

the far north now hosts 87,000 of cameroon’s over 360,000 refugees, 191,000 internally displaced people (idps) and 36,000 cameroonian returnees. overall, including local cameroonians, an estimated 1.6 million people in the far north now need urgent humanitarian assistance, more than half of 2.9 million people who share the same plight throughout the country.

the government, preoccupied with its military campaign against boko haram, has done little to support affected civilians. international agencies and ngos have taken welcome steps to meet the needs of refugees, and to a lesser extent idps, even if these efforts have been underfunded and sometimes insufficiently coordinated. earlier and much better-funded attention to the wider problems of displacement will make that response more effective, more sustainable and better able to prevent conflict recurring.

minawao camp: the visible tip of the humanitarian crisis

opened in july 2013 in the far north’s mayo tsanga department, minawao camp hosts nigerians fleeing boko haram atrocities. initially it hosted 18,000 refugees. now 60,000 people live there, three times its official capacity. each week 150 more people arrive and 60 babies are born. it now covers a sprawling 623 hectares, as the authorities decided to expand the camp rather than set up a second site in the mayo danay department, as proposed by the un high commission for refugees (unhcr) in 2015. when crisis group conducted research in minawao in january, assistance was being given by ten ngos and un agencies.

in 2013, the refugees’ situation was dire, due to a lack of government experience with refugees and an absence of international attention and funding. since then, things have gradually improved, especially in education. some 68 per cent of children go to school in the camp, far above the far north’s 46 per cent education rate average, but still below the 84 per cent national average. germany has helped some who finish high school in the camp to attend universities in buea or yaoundé. in last year’s first school leaving certificate examination (a cameroonian test taken between the ages of eleven and thirteen), minawao camp students, taught by anglophone cameroonian teachers, ranked first in the entire mayo tsanaga department.

however, because of funding shortfalls, humanitarian assistance still covers only about one third of the urgent needs in the far north. as a result, key problems remain, including shortages of food, water, healthcare assistance, school equipment and social activities.

the work of ngos and religious leaders has also reduced initial communal and religious tensions caused by the crisis. but problems have emerged recently between established and newly arrived refugees. the former often suspect the latter of being boko haram sympathisers. “how did they manage to stay in boko haram-controlled areas for more than a year if they were not sympathisers? why do they only leave their place and seek asylum now, when boko haram is weakened?”, one refugee asked us. these suspicions explain why the earlier refugees are reluctant to allow new ones to join their 184 strong camp security group, or the camp’s nine committees dealing with issues like the environment, water, youth and women’s needs.

such suspicions take little account of the complex route many new arrivals have taken to get to the camp. most of those who arrived recently were already in cameroon, living either in the border towns or with cameroonian families. very few have come directly from nigeria, and many among them were previously in nigerian idp camps. “we were told by our friends and families that refugees are better looked after here than in idp camps in our country”, one refugee said. other newly arrived refugees told crisis group they moved to minawao due to scarcity of resources in other parts of cameroon. “my in-laws’ family in mozogo (in mayo tsanaga) was no longer able to feed us and our four children. we had no access to land and no ngo support, so we decided to move in minawao”, says recent arrival yacoubou, a nigerian from balavrasa in the gwoza local government area. the prefect, or head civilian administrator, of mayo tsanaga noted: “most new refugees have already been living in cameroon for a year or more”.

tensions are also surfacing between new arrivals and local people. between 2015 and 2016, cameroonians from the town of zamaï near minawao camp accused refugees of destroying their trees for firewood. the spokesman and elected president of the central committee of refugees told crisis group: “we need that for cooking and build[ing] our shelters”. after the unhcr and plan international mediated between the refugees and the zamaï traditional chief, the cutting of trees now appears to have been solved with compensation given to the local community, including through the replanting of 30,000 trees.

the displacement crisis beyond the camps

despite needing far greater resources as ever more people arrive seeking refuge, minawao offers the best humanitarian assistance in the region. it benefits from international aid, partly as a result of concern generated by visits from the former unhcr head antónio guterres, in march 2016, quickly followed by then u.s. ambassador to the un samantha power in april.

but not only refugees need help. more than 1.6 million are in urgent need of food aid in cameroon’s far north, where even before the crisis three of the region’s four million inhabitants lived under the poverty line. some of the 30,000 unregistered refugees and most idps live in host communities, not in camps. those host communities have to share what they have with them and lack the funds and support to do so. few of the 191,000 idps receive help from the government, which relies on the international community to deal with the humanitarian aspects of the conflict while it focuses on the military response. in gassama, labado and several other villages, the army has pushed inhabitants out of their homes to secure areas round their bases, but without giving any support or making plans for their return.


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: somalia

a total of us$825 million is requested for the first half of 2017 to reach 5.5 million people with life-saving assistance and livelihood support, so as to prevent the worst-case scenario.

situation overview

the humanitarian situation in somalia is rapidly deteriorating and famine is a strong possibility in 2017. this comes only six years after a devastating famine led to the death of more than a quarter of a million people – half of them children. the severe drought is a result of two consecutive seasons of poor rainfall, more in some areas. in the worst affected areas, large-scale crop failure and high levels of livestock deaths are occurring. malnutrition and drought-related diseases are on the rise, so are displacements, including to ethiopia. increasing competition for resources such as water is already increasing local tensions and could trigger further inter-communal conflict. over 6.2 million people-half the population-are in need of humanitarian assistance. the situation of children of somalia is particularly grave

a large scale-up of the drought response in february and march can help prevent the worst-case humanitarian scenario and save lives and livelihoods. this will also help preserve important gains made in recent years. a total of us$825 million is requested for the first half of 2017 to reach 5.5 million people with life-saving assistance and livelihood support.

a drought – even one this severe – does not automatically lead to a catastrophe if humanitarian partners respond early enough with timely support from the international community. there are significant differences and opportunities today, compared to the 2011 famine, including a more engaged donor community, closely following the situation on the ground. ngos and un agencies have a better footprint now than in 2011, allowing for a more granular analysis of the situation and enabling better targeted scale-up. there are systems in place for rapid scale-up of cash based programming, systems which were only starting up back in 2011. enhanced engagement with local actors and improved coordination with the federal government and state-level authorities has helped ensure a more joined up reading of the situation, allowing partners to increasingly be on the same page in terms of scope and scale of the crisis, and enhancing accountability. stronger partnership with the organization of islamic cooperation and muslim charities allows for better coordination and collaboration across various aid streams. improved engagement with local ngos and enhanced risk management systems have helped ensure greater efficiency and more accountable spending of resources.

building on lessons learned from the 2011 famine, this operational plan outlines the main needs, gaps and plans for response by humanitarian partners in the first half of 2017 to prevent a famine. it is based on the worst-case scenario given that even if the gu rains are better than foreseen, the crisis is already at a point where much of the damage has been done.

of the $825 million required for the first half of 2017 to reach 5.5 million people with life-saving assistance and livelihood support, $35 million have already been contributed by donors, hereof $18 million from the central emergency response fund and $14 million channeled through the somalia humanitarian fund. these requirements, which reflect an increase in operational requirements, are part of the overall 2017 somalia hrp requirement, which will be revised accordingly in early march 2017.


Information

source: amnesty international
country: bangladesh, china, democratic republic of the congo, egypt, ethiopia, france, honduras, hungary, india, iran (islamic republic of), myanmar, philippines, russian federation, saudi arabia, south sudan, sudan, syrian arab republic, thailand, turkey, united kingdom of great britain and northern ireland, united states of america, venezuela (bolivarian republic of), world

dehumanizing political rhetoric is creating a more divided and dangerous world, the rights group warns in its annual report.

‘politics of demonization’ breeding division and fear

  • amnesty international releases its annual report for 2016 to 2017
  • risk of domino effect as powerful states backtrack on human rights commitments
  • salil shetty, head of the global movement, warns that “never again” has become meaningless as states fail to react to mass atrocities

politicians wielding a toxic, dehumanizing “us vs them” rhetoric are creating a more divided and dangerous world, warned amnesty international today as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world.

the report, _the state of the world’s human rights_, delivers the most comprehensive analysis of the state of human rights around the world, covering 159 countries. it warns that the consequences of “us vs them” rhetoric setting the agenda in europe, the united states and elsewhere is fuelling a global pushback against human rights and leaving the global response to mass atrocities perilously weak.

“2016 was the year when the cynical use of ‘us vs them’ narratives of blame, hate and fear took on a global prominence to a level not seen since the 1930s. too many politicians are answering legitimate economic and security fears with a poisonous and divisive manipulation of identity politics in an attempt to win votes,” said salil shetty, secretary general of amnesty international.

“divisive fear-mongering has become a dangerous force in world affairs. whether it is trump, orban, erdoğan or duterte, more and more politicians calling themselves anti-establishment are wielding a toxic agenda that hounds, scapegoats and dehumanizes entire groups of people.

“today’s politics of demonization shamelessly peddles a dangerous idea that some people are less human than others, stripping away the humanity of entire groups of people. this threatens to unleash the darkest aspects of human nature.”

politics of demonization drives global pushback on human rights

seismic political shifts in 2016 exposed the potential of hateful rhetoric to unleash the dark side of human nature. the global trend of angrier and more divisive politics was exemplified by donald trump’s poisonous campaign rhetoric, but political leaders in various parts of the world also wagered their future power on narratives of fear, blame and division.

this rhetoric is having an increasingly pervasive impact on policy and action. in 2016, governments turned a blind eye to war crimes, pushed through deals that undermine the right to claim asylum, passed laws that violate free expression, incited murder of people simply because they are accused of using drugs, justified torture and mass surveillance, and extended draconian police powers.

governments also turned on refugees and migrants; often an easy target for scapegoating. amnesty international’s annual report documents how 36 countries violated international law by unlawfully sending refugees back to a country where their rights were at risk.

most recently, president trump put his hateful xenophobic pre-election rhetoric into action by signing an executive order in an attempt to prevent refugees from seeking resettlement in the usa; blocking people fleeing conflict and persecution from war-torn countries such as syria from seeking safe haven in the country.

meanwhile, australia purposefully inflicts terrible suffering by trapping refugees on nauru and manus island, the eu made an illegal and reckless deal with turkey to send refugees back there, even though it is not safe for them, and mexico and the usa continue to deport people fleeing rampant violence in central america.

elsewhere, china, egypt, ethiopia, india, iran, thailand and turkey carried out massive crackdowns. while other countries pursued intrusive security measures, such as prolonged emergency powers in france and unprecedented catastrophic surveillance laws in the uk. another feature of “strongman” politics was a rise in anti-feminist and -lgbti rhetoric, such as efforts to roll back women’s rights in poland, which were met with massive protests.

“instead of fighting for people’s rights, too many leaders have adopted a dehumanizing agenda for political expediency. many are violating rights of scapegoated groups to score political points, or to distract from their own failures to ensure economic and social rights,” said salil shetty.

“in 2016, these most toxic forms of dehumanization became a dominant force in mainstream global politics. the limits of what is acceptable have shifted. politicians are shamelessly and actively legitimizing all sorts of hateful rhetoric and policies based on people’s identity: misogyny, racism and homophobia.

“the first target has been refugees and, if this continues in 2017, others will be in the cross-hairs. the reverberations will lead to more attacks on the basis of race, gender, nationality and religion. when we cease to see each other as human beings with the same rights, we move closer to the abyss.”

world turns its back on mass atrocities

amnesty international is warning that 2017 will see ongoing crises exacerbated by a debilitating absence of human rights leadership on a chaotic world stage. the politics of “us vs them” is also taking shape at the international level, replacing multilateralism with a more aggressive, confrontational world order.

“with world leaders lacking political will to put pressure on other states violating human rights, basic principles from accountability for mass atrocities to the right to asylum are at stake,” said salil shetty.

“even states that once claimed to champion rights abroad are now too busy rolling back human rights at home to hold others to account. the more countries backtrack on fundamental human rights commitments, the more we risk a domino effect of leaders emboldened to knock back established human rights protections.”

the world faces a long list of crises with little political will to address them: including syria, yemen, libya, afghanistan, central america, central african republic, burundi, iraq, south sudan and sudan. amnesty international’s annual report documented war crimes committed in at least 23 countries in 2016.

despite these challenges, international indifference to war crimes has become an entrenched normality as the un security council remains paralyzed by rivalries between permanent member states.

“the beginning of 2017 finds many of the world’s most powerful states pursuing narrower national interests at the expense of international cooperation. this risks taking us towards a more chaotic, dangerous world,” said salil shetty.

“a new world order where human rights are portrayed as a barrier to national interests makes the ability to tackle mass atrocities dangerously low, leaving the door open to abuses reminiscent of the darkest times of human history.

“the international community has already responded with deafening silence after countless atrocities in 2016: a live stream of horror from aleppo, thousands of people killed by the police in the philippines’ ‘war on drugs’, use of chemical weapons and hundreds of villages burned in darfur. the big question in 2017 will be how far the world lets atrocities go before doing something about them.”

who is going to stand up for human rights?

amnesty international is calling on people around the world to resist cynical efforts to roll back long-established human rights in exchange for the distant promise of prosperity and security.

the report warns that global solidarity and public mobilization will be particularly important to defend individuals who stand up to those in power and defend human rights, who are often cast by governments as a threat to economic development, security or other priorities.

amnesty international’s annual report documents people killed for peacefully standing up for human rights in 22 countries in 2016. they include those targeted for challenging entrenched economic interests, defending minorities and small communities or opposing traditional barriers to women’s and lgbti rights. the killing of the high-profile indigenous leader and human rights defender berta cáceres in honduras on 2 march 2016 sent a chilling message to activists but nobody was brought to justice.

“we cannot passively rely on governments to stand up for human rights, we the people have to take action. with politicians increasingly willing to demonize entire groups of people, the need for all of us to stand up for the basic values of human dignity and equality everywhere has seldom been clearer,” said salil shetty.

“every person must ask their government to use whatever power and influence they have to call out human rights abusers. in dark times, individuals have made a difference when they took a stand, be they civil rights activists in the usa, anti-apartheid activists in south africa, or women’s rights and lgbti movements around the world. we must all rise to that challenge now.”

background

amnesty international has documented grave violations of human rights in 2016 in 159 countries. examples of the rise and impact of poisonous rhetoric, national crackdowns on activism and freedom of expression highlighted by amnesty international in its annual report include, but are by no means limited, to:

bangladesh: instead of providing protection for or investigating the killings of activists, reporters and bloggers, authorities have pursued trials against media and the opposition for, among other things, facebook posts.

china: ongoing crackdown against lawyers and activists continued, including incommunicado detention, televised confessions and harassments of family members.

drc: pro-democracy activists subjected to arbitrary arrests and, in some cases, prolonged incommunicado detention.

egypt: authorities used travel bans, financial restrictions and asset freezes to undermine, smear and silence civil society groups.

ethiopia: a government increasingly intolerant of dissenting voices used anti-terror laws and a state of emergency to crack down on journalists, human rights defenders, the political opposition and, in particular, protesters who have been met with excessive and lethal force. 

france: heavy-handed security measures under the prolonged state of emergency have included thousands of house searches, as well as travel bans and detentions.

honduras: berta cáceres and seven other human rights activists were killed.

hungary: government rhetoric championed a divisive brand of identity politics and a dark vision of “fortress europe”, which translated into a policy of systematic crackdown on refugee and migrants rights.

india: authorities used repressive laws to curb freedom of expression and silence critical voices. human rights defenders and organizations continued to face harassment and intimidation. oppressive laws have been used to try to silence student activists, academics, journalists and human rights defenders.

iran: heavy suppression of freedom of expression, association, peaceful assembly and religious beliefs. peaceful critics jailed after grossly unfair trials before revolutionary courts, including journalists, lawyers, bloggers, students, women’s rights activists, filmmakers and even musicians.

myanmar: tens of thousands of rohingya people - who remain deprived of a nationality - displaced by “clearance operations” amid reports of unlawful killings, indiscriminate firing on civilians, rape and arbitrary arrests. meanwhile, state media published opinion articles containing alarmingly dehumanizing language.

philippines: a wave of extrajudicial executions ensued after president duterte promised to kill tens of thousands of people suspected of being involved in the drug trade.

russia: at home the government noose tightened around national ngos, with increasing propaganda labelling critics as “undesirable” or “foreign agents”, and the first prosecution of ngos under a “foreign agents” law. meanwhile, dozens of independent ngos receiving foreign funding were added to the list of “foreign agents”. abroad there was a complete disregard for international humanitarian law in syria.

saudi arabia: critics, human rights defenders and minority rights activists have been detained and jailed on vaguely worded charges such as “insulting the state”. coalition forces led by saudi arabia committed serious violations of international law, including alleged war crimes, in yemen. coalition forces bombed schools, hospitals, markets and mosques, killing and injuring thousands of civilians using arms supplied by the us and uk governments, including internationally banned cluster bombs.

south sudan: ongoing fighting continued to have devastating humanitarian consequences for civilian populations, with violations and abuses of international human rights and humanitarian law.

sudan: evidence pointed strongly to the use of chemical weapons by government forces in darfur. elsewhere, suspected opponents and critics of the government subjected to arbitrary arrests and detentions. excessive use of force by the authorities in dispersing gatherings led to numerous casualties.  

syria: impunity for war crimes and gross human rights abuses continued, including indiscriminate attacks and direct attacks on civilians and lengthy sieges that trapped civilians. the human rights community has been almost completely crushed, with activists either imprisoned, tortured, disappeared, or forced to flee the country.

thailand: emergency powers, defamation and sedition laws used to restrict freedom of expression.

turkey: tens of thousands locked up after failed coup, with hundreds of ngos suspended, a massive media crackdown, and the continuing onslaught in kurdish areas.

uk: a spike in hate crimes followed the referendum on european union membership. a new surveillance law granted significantly increased powers to intelligence and other agencies to invade people’s privacy on a massive scale.

usa: an election campaign marked by discriminatory, misogynist and xenophobic rhetoric raised serious concerns about the strength of future us commitments to human rights domestically and globally.

venezuela: backlash against outspoken human rights defenders who raised the alarm about the humanitarian crisis caused by the government’s failure to meet the economic and social rights of the population. 


for more information or to request an interview please call amnesty international's press office in london, uk, on

+44 20 7413 5566 or +44 (0)77 7847 2126

email: [email protected]

twitter: @amnestypress

international secretariat, amnesty international, 1 easton st., london wc1x 0dw, uk


Information

source: un human rights council
country: world

bloggers, indigenous peoples, journalists and whistle-blowers are at risk amid a 'lack of strong and ambitious political action.'

note by the secretariat

in his report, prepared pursuant to general assembly resolutions 66/164 and 68/181 and human rights council resolutions 16/5 and 25/18, the special rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders, michel forst, provides a detailed summary of the activities he carried out during his first mandate, including statistics and trends based on the communications that he sent to states, his visits to a number of countries, the dialogues established with the authorities of various states, and the close cooperation developed with key stakeholders in the protection of human rights worldwide. the special rapporteur also presents the work in progress and the challenges and issues on which he plans to focus during his next mandate. the report includes suggestions for diversifying working methods, broadening the scope of cooperation with other key actors, and enhancing the visibility and accessibility of his mandate. human rights defenders and the promotion of their work and their protection will remain at the core of the special rapporteur’s work.

i. introduction

  1. after spending the past three years travelling around the world and documenting the situation of human rights defenders, the special rapporteur is more appalled than ever to see attacks against them multiplying everywhere, assailing bloggers, indigenous peoples, journalists, community leaders, whistle-blowers and community volunteers. furthermore, the special rapporteur has become convinced that the incidents in question are not isolated acts but concerted attacks against those who try to embody the ideal of the universal declaration of human rights in a world free from fear and want.

  2. the special rapporteur is concerned by the lack of response to observations that have been made repeatedly since the establishment of the mandate. even the reports of his predecessors hina jilani and margaret sekaggya made mention of certain difficulties and of the lack of strong and ambitious political action aimed at bringing a lasting end to attacks against defenders. how many human tragedies, how many imprisoned, tortured and murdered defenders must there be before the world realizes that such people are the lifeblood that our democracies need in order to flourish and survive over time?

  3. we must be bolder and more creative in order to face up to threats that weigh heavily on civil society as a whole and on every individual fighting for fundamental rights and freedoms. the special rapporteur has also noted that intolerance thrives in part because people know little about their rights or the role of those who protect them. in that regard, it is more vital than ever to make the language of human rights accessible to all in order to ensure that civil society continues to enforce accountability.

  4. the special rapporteur also believes that efforts and resources must be directed at ensuring that states respect the commitments that they have made. in recent decades, many standards of human rights protection have been adopted at the international level. the special rapporteur has observed that these standards, for the most part, are not implemented on the ground and that, when they are, they are too often applied haphazardly. in time, if these standards remain ineffective, we risk seeing entire populations lose hope and turn away from the struggle for human rights. as a matter of urgency, these standards must therefore become a reality on the ground.

  5. the special rapporteur has decided that the present report should focus on the activities carried out between june 2014 and march 2017 (the period corresponding to his first mandate) to ensure that they are brought to the attention of the states and actors with which he has regularly engaged. this report is also an opportunity for the special rapporteur to give an account of his work to the many human rights defenders who, in complete confidence, have collaborated with him and his team over the past three years and, in some cases, exposed themselves to reprisals simply for having confided their tragic situations to him. the special rapporteur still recalls the words, expressions and smiles of the hundreds of defenders he met during those three years and feels responsible for the way in which the international community responds to their hopes and expectations.

  6. as defenders face unprecedented attacks intended to undermine the legitimacy, credibility and sincerity of their commitment, it seems essential to quickly establish links between the specific actions undertaken by the special rapporteur and the pledges made at the united nations when he was appointed in 2014. as populist, nationalist and fundamentalist movements of all kinds multiply, the special rapporteur remains convinced that more can be done under his mandate and that his office must continue to serve as a watchdog, a warning mechanism and a crucial resource for thousands of people.

  7. like his predecessors, the special rapporteur has sought to develop innovative working methods in order to be more effective and to better respond to defenders’ need for protection. this commitment to action is meaningful only if it is accompanied by objective assessments. that is why, in his view, it was essential to spend time reflecting on what has been implemented in order to analyse and assess the impact of all the work that he and his team have carried out over nearly three years. to that end, this report takes stock of the progress made and the challenges that lie ahead. it also identifies those areas in which, in view of the possible renewal of his mandate, the special rapporteur intends to become more involved so that his work remains relevant and responds as effectively as possible to defenders’ expectations. this report should be seen not as an exhaustive exercise, but as a mirror held up to the action plan established in october 2014 (a/69/259).

  8. through this report, the special rapporteur has also sought to give a voice to those who, whether individually or through their organizations, worked with him within the framework of his mandate and made it possible to implement his road map.


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs, un humanitarian coordinator in yemen
country: yemen

increased fighting along the western coast and greater restrictions of life-saving commodities, including food staples, into al hudaydah port are aggravating an already terrible humanitarian situation in yemen.

sana'a, 21 february 2017

sana'a, 21 february 2017 i am deeply concerned with the escalation of conflict and militarization of yemen’s western coast. it is coming at a great cost to civilians.

increased fighting along the western coast which is effectively limiting the flow of life-saving commodities, including food staples, into al hudaydah port is aggravating an already terrible humanitarian situation in yemen. over 17 million people are currently unable to adequately feed themselves and are frequently forced to skip meals - women and girls eat the least and last. seven million yeminis do not know where their next meal will come from and are ever closer to starvation.

for almost two months, conflict has escalated from the ground, air and sea in the dhubab and al mukha areas in taizz governorate. scores of civilians have been either killed or forced to flee from their homes. airstrikes have destroyed or damaged critical roads and bridges across al hudaydah governorate. unexploded rockets have also landed inside the al hudaydah port, reducing even further the number of ships and imports. only a limited number of shipping companies now use the port, with vessels being forced to redirect their shipments, including humanitarian supplies, to aden.
yet, the aden port does not have the required capacity or infrastructure to accommodate yemen’s import demands. furthermore, the transport of goods from aden to the rest of the country is not guaranteed given the additional costs, blocked or damaged roads, lack of fuel, and ongoing conflict.

the availability of food in markets and the food pipeline are at imminent risk. we are witnessing food shortages, rising food and fuel prices, disruptions to agricultural production, and plummeting purchasing power, especially brought about by the lack of salary payments in the public sector for over six months. given that the country is 80-90 per cent dependent on imported food staples; i am compelled to raise the alarm. if left unabated, these factors combined could accelerate the onset of famine.

humanitarian partners are working hard to prevent the suffering of hundreds of thousands of children from crippling malnutrition, which could stunt a generation if not confronted now. close to half a million children are prioritized for assistance; a nearly 200 per cent increase since 2014. yet, despite all the efforts, humanitarians cannot replace a functioning commercial sector.

the inhumanity of using the economy or food as a means to wage war is unacceptable and is against international humanitarian law. i urgently call on all parties to the conflict and on those that have influence over the parties to facilitate the rapid entry of critical life-saving food staples into all yemeni ports; to refrain from or not contribute to the damage and destruction of critical infrastructure required to transport food staples throughout the country; and to find or support a way to pay public sector salaries so that the needy can purchase what is available.

the best means to prevent famine in yemen is for weapons to fall silent across the country and for the parties to the conflict to return to the negotiating table. the international community must also assume its responsibility and provide the needed funds to enable a timely and principled humanitarian response. the people of yemen are counting on it.

for further information, please contact:
george khoury, head of ocha yemen, [email protected], tel +967 712 222 207 zaid al alayaa, information officer ocha yemen, [email protected], tel. +967 2222 835 jessica j. jordan, head of communication (oic), [email protected], tel. +962 79867 4617 ocha press releases are available at www.unocha.org or www.reliefweb.int


Information

source: un children's fund
country: mongolia

children born or in utero during the 2009/10 catastrophic winter and living in districts severely hit have significantly worse health compared with same-age children living in less affected districts.

by valeria groppo

a result of climate change extreme weather events are becoming more intense and more frequent in many regions of the world. from increasing precipitation and cyclones in high latitudes and tropical regions, to intensifying droughts in southern africa, this trend is likely to continue throughout the 21st century.

weather shocks can have long-lasting effects on children’s health and education. hence, these shocks can reduce countries’ levels of education and economic growth in the long term. poor people in developing regions of the world often bear the highest costs of these events. this is mainly due to limited social protection and insurance against weather risks, combined with lack of economic opportunities.

extreme winters threaten herding households

most studies on the impact of extreme weather events focus on droughts or rainfall shocks in tropical or dry regions. however, cold shocks in the form of extremely harsh winters can also be damaging for children. while affecting all regions with continental climate and large seasonal variations in temperature, such as russia, inland china or the himalayas, these shocks are especially relevant in mongolia.

over the past two decades, mongolia was hit by two extremely severe winters, which caused mass livestock mortality. the phenomenon of harsh winters causing mass livestock mortality is referred to as dzud in mongolian language. extreme winters are characterized by exceptionally cold temperature, excessive snow, lack of precipitations during the previous summer and fluctuations in temperature that cause the snow to melt and then ice over, thus hindering animal grazing. the two recent dzud events can be seen in figure 1, which shows livestock development in mongolia over the period 1991-2014. the first event spanned three consecutive winters during the period 1999-2002, while the second occurred in the single winter of 2009/10.

both shocks dramatically threatened the livelihoods of the mongolian population. indeed, for about one third of mongolians, animals represent the primary source of nutrition and income. many herders lost a substantial portion of their herd during dzud disasters, thus falling into situations of food insecurity and poverty.

children among the most affected by extreme winters

two recent papers study the consequences of extreme winters on children’s health and education, respectively. as it is often the case when extreme weather hits, the studies find that children were severely affected by the weather shocks. this calls for special attention from unicef, which can play a leading role in supporting government policies and programmes to protect children before other extreme weather events occur.

the first paper specifically studies the impact of the 2009/10 dzud on the health of children younger than 7 years, as measured by the height-for-age indicator. results show that children who were born or in utero during the 2009/10 catastrophic winter and lived in districts that were severely hit by the shock have significantly worse health, compared to same-age children living in less affected districts.

the second paper examines the impact of extreme weather events on education. the study finds that individuals who were of school age during the shock and lived in severely affected districts are significantly less likely to have completed mandatory education, compared to peers in less affected districts. the effects are verified for both the 1999/2002 and the 2009/2010 winters. they are also large in magnitude and persist in the long term, up to about ten years after the shock. this is particularly striking in a middle-income country like mongolia, where there are no tuition fees for basic education.

in both studies, the effects only hit children from households that were engaged in herding before the shock. moreover, the data show a negative correlation between shock intensity and post-shock household income. taken together, the results suggest that it is not winter conditions, per se, to which all children are exposed, which drive the results. actually, it appears that weather shocks affected children mainly through losses in household assets and income.

what can unicef do to protect children from extreme weather shocks?

the fact that children were not shielded from the negative consequences of the 2009/10 winter disaster shows that the country did not experience sufficient learning from previous weather shocks. because extreme weather is likely to strike again in mongolia and elsewhere, it is essential to apply policies which protect vulnerable children in case of future shocks.

more research is needed to better understand the long-term effects of weather events and the mechanisms behind them. however, the existing evidence already indicates a range of complementary policies that can mitigate the impact of weather shocks on children. as unicef previously advocated, such policies include post-disaster relief, such as the provision of nutritional supplements to infants or pregnant mothers or the delivery of fodder to protect weakened animals. the research here presented finds indeed a positive correlation between the amount of food and fodder aid distributed after the shock and children’s health outcomes in a given district.

preventive interventions are equally if not more important than post-shock ones. in the context of health protection, these may include monitoring the health of pregnant mothers and infants – even in non-disaster years - especially in remote rural areas and in poorer households. moreover, weather insurance can be effective in protecting household income and, in turn, children’s health and education. increasing the diversification of households’ economic activities can also improve households’ resilience in the face of weather extremes. as a form of income support, cash transfers also have a great potential as a mitigation policy in the context of natural disasters. finally, improving the dissemination of information on extreme weather events, for instance through early warning systems, may also prevent the negative consequences of extreme weather on children.

_valeria groppo is social and economic policy consultant at the unicef office of research – innocenti. thanks to michelle mills for her comments. the research presented in this blog was conducted within the project “economics of climate change: coping with shocks in mongolia”. the project was carried out by a team of researchers at the german institute of economic research (diw berlin), in cooperation with the mongolian national statistical office (nso). funding for the project was provided by the german federal ministry of education and research._


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: nigeria

as relief organizations increase response to the humanitarian emergency in the north-east of nigeria, more support is required to sustain life-saving assistance to millions devastated by boko haram-linked violence.

maiduguri/abuja, 21 february 2017: as relief organizations increase response to the humanitarian emergency in the north-east of nigeria, timely donor support is required to sustain life-saving assistance to millions people devastated by boko haram-linked violence.

the eight-year long conflict has left some 8.5 million people in need of humanitarian assistance in the worst-affected states of nigeria’s north-east. in the coming months, around 5.1 million people will face severe food insecurity in the region, where some 1.8 million people have been displaced and millions are exposed to violence and abuse.

“we are requesting for only a little over us$1 billion. if the resources do not arrive in time, one in five children suffering sever acute malnutrition could die. the likelihood of a child with severe acute malnutrition surviving is nine times less than a properly nourished child,” said peter lundberg, the deputy humanitarian coordinator for nigeria.

“food assistance alone will cost $1 million a day to avoid famine in a region where 450,000 children under five will suffer from severe acute malnutrition this year,” said lundberg. “sustained and timely financial support is needed to maintain the scale-up in operations desperately needed in the north-east of nigeria.”

during a recent visit by representatives of 12 donor countries and agencies to borno state, in the run up to the 24 february humanitarian conference on nigeria and lake chad region, they lauded the scale-up of humanitarian operations in the north-east and emphasized the need for more funding, a stance the humanitarian community in nigeria concurs with. “we are grateful to our donors who have enabled us scale up the response and appreciate their continued commitment. we look forward to receiving the needed resources to implement the 2017 humanitarian response plan for nigeria,” lundberg said


Information

source: food and agriculture organization of the united nations
country: world

mankind's ability to feed itself is in jeopardy due to intensifying pressures on natural resources, mounting inequality, and the fallout from a changing climate, warns a fao report.

22 february 2017, rome - mankind's future ability to feed itself is in jeopardy due to intensifying pressures on natural resources, mounting inequality, and the fallout from a changing climate, warns a new fao report out today.

though very real and significant progress in reducing global hunger has been achieved over the past 30 years, "expanding food production and economic growth have often come at a heavy cost to the natural environment," says the future of food and agriculture: trends and challenges.

"almost one half of the forests that once covered the earth are now gone. groundwater sources are being depleted rapidly. biodiversity has been deeply eroded," it notes.

as a result, "planetary boundaries may well be surpassed, if current trends continue," cautions fao director-general josé graziano da silva in his introduction to the report.

by 2050 humanity's ranks will likely have grown to nearly 10 billion people. in a scenario with moderate economic growth, this population increase will push up global demand for agricultural products by 50 percent over present levels projects the future of food and agriculture, intensifying pressures on already-strained natural resources.

at the same time, greater numbers of people will be eating fewer cereals and larger amounts of meat, fruits, vegetables and processed food — a result of an ongoing global dietary transition that will further add to those pressures, driving more deforestation, land degradation, and greenhouse gas emissions.

alongside these trends, the planet's changing climate will throw up additional hurdles. "climate change will affect every aspect of food production," the report says. these include greater variability of precipitation and increases in the frequency of droughts and floods.

to reach zero hunger, we need to step up our efforts

the core question raised by today's fao publication is whether, looking ahead, the world's agriculture and food systems are capable of sustainably meeting the needs of a burgeoning global population.

the short answer? yes, the planet's food systems are capable of producing enough food to do so, and in a sustainable way, but unlocking that potential — and ensuring that all of humanity benefits — will require "major transformations."

without a push to invest in and retool food systems, far too many people will still be hungry in 2030 — the year by which the new sustainable development goals (sdg) agenda has targeted the eradication of chronic food insecurity and malnutrition, the report warns.

"without additional efforts to promote pro-poor development, reduce inequalities and protect vulnerable people, more than 600 million people would still be undernourished in 2030," it says. in fact, the current rate of progress would not even be enough to eradicate hunger by 2050.

where will our food come from?

given the limited scope for expanding agriculture's use of more land and water resources, the production increases needed to meet rising food demand will have to come mainly from improvements in productivity and resource-use efficiency.

however there are worrying signs that yield growth is levelling off for major crops. since the 1990s, average increases in the yields of maize, rice, and wheat at the global level generally run just over 1 percent per annum, the report notes.

to tackle these and the other challenges outlined in the report, "business-as-usual" is not an option, the future of food and agriculture argues.

"major transformations in agricultural systems, rural economies and natural resource management will be needed if we are to meet the multiple challenges before us and realize the full potential of food and agriculture to ensure a secure and healthy future for all people and the entire planet," it says.

"high-input, resource-intensive farming systems, which have caused massive deforestation, water scarcities, soil depletion and high levels of greenhouse gas emissions, cannot deliver sustainable food and agricultural production," adds the report.

more with less

the core challenge is to produce more with less, while preserving and enhancing the livelihoods of small-scale and family farmers, and ensuring access to food by the most vulnerable. for this, a twin-track approach is needed which combines investment in social protection, to immediately tackle undernourishment, and pro-poor investments in productive activities — especially agriculture and in rural economies — to sustainably increase income-earning opportunities of the poor.

the world will need to shift to more sustainable food systems which make more efficient use of land, water and other inputs and sharply reduce their use of fossil fuels, leading to a drastic cut of agricultural green-house gas emissions, greater conservation of biodiversity, and a reduction of waste. this will necessitate more investment in agriculture and agrifood systems, as well as greater spending on research and development, the report says, to promote innovation, support sustainable production increases, and find better ways to cope with issues like water scarcity and climate change.

along with boosting production and resilience, equally critical will be creating food supply chains that better connect farmers in low- and middle-income countries to urban markets — along with measures which ensure access for consumers to nutritious and safe food at affordable prices, such as such as pricing policies and social protection programs, it says.


Information

source: save the children
country: iraq, syrian arab republic

attempt to flee, and risk being killed by isis; stay, and face bombs, crossfire and dire food shortages. save the children calls for safe escape routes and humanitarian access.

as iraqi forces push ahead with a new offensive to retake western mosul, 350,000 children are trapped inside the city.

families in mosul face a brutal choice: attempt to flee, and risk being killed by isis fighters. stay, and face bombs, crossfire and dire food shortages.

escaping through minefields

kareem* and his family fled their village north of mosul a week ago. his five children are all aged under ten – the youngest, randa*, is just eight months old. they had to escape through minefields. they’re now living at a camp in syria, where 5,000 people have arrived in the last two months. we’re providing psychosocial support for children in the camp, and we’ve built water tanks and latrines. but while kareem and his children have escaped iraq, his relatives are still trapped in mosul. kareem broke down in tears as he told our staff about the conditions they face.

life under isis in mosul

“i have three sisters who live with their husbands and children in the western part of the city of mosul, an isis controlled area. i last spoke to them ten days ago.

“my sisters are living in extreme conditions. there is nothing available there, no bread, no water, no food. they all have young children who are a similar age to my children.

“they are surviving off food they have kept in their stores. they are afraid they will starve to death if the area remains besieged and under isis control for much longer.

“there are people worse off than them – they told me that in another area there are people who are surviving off eating the meat of cats.”

fears of starvation

“my uncle also lives in the west side of the city. he told me on the phone that people have started begging out of desperation.

“people come knocking on the doors begging for even a morsel of food.

“he says if the area stays under isis control much longer they are worried that the same thing that happened in the besieged area of madaya (in syria) will happen to them.

“people will start dying of starvation.”

‘if someone gets sick, they die’

“there is no medical treatment available at all. it’s a besieged area. if someone gets sick, they die.

“there’s nothing to keep them warm except blankets. no supplies have been in or out of the area since four months ago. nothing has been in or out.

“the area is completely surrounded and there is no way out for them. the road has been cut off and if anyone tries to leave they are killed.”

airstrikes and terror

“right now i think my sisters are fine but i honestly don’t know if i’ll ever see them again.

“ten days ago, five artillery shells fell close to one of their houses. they were ok, but terrified.

“i heard that airstrikes are going to start on the area soon and so they could get hit and die.

“they are hoping that the army will enter as soon as possible and isis will have to leave the area.”

‘killed on the spot’

“twenty days ago, a group of my relatives tried to leave the western part of the city. my uncle told me they were trying to reach an area held by the iraqi army.

“they were caught by isis and killed on the spot.

“twenty people including women and children. isis fighters ambushed them in the night and killed them immediately.

“before the siege started, if anyone tried to leave they would pay a fine to isis and they would be made to go back to their homes.

“but once the siege started an order was issued that if anyone tried to leave they’d be killed immediately. they will kill anyone, even women and children.

afraid to speak

“it is difficult to reach my family members because mobile phones are forbidden there. even if you are caught with a sim card they will punish you.

“there is no network and you have to go to high locations to speak on the phone.

“last time i spoke to one of my sisters they were on the roof of their building. but there are drones that monitor the networks and they are afraid to speak. talking with them is illegal.

“it’s a terrible situation.”

what we’re calling for

we’re urging iraqi forces and their coalition allies, including the us and uk, to ensure children, schools and hospitals are protected as forces advance.

safe escape routes must be established for civilians, and humanitarian aid must be allowed in as soon as possible.

our emergency teams are on the ground in iraq and syria right now. we’re helping families who have fled mosul with food, water and essential supplies. and we’re supporting children who have been separated from their loved ones.

*names have been changed to protect identities.


Information

source: un secretary-general, un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: nigeria, somalia, south sudan, yemen

"one of the biggest obstacles we face is funding," said antónio guterres, as he joined other top un officials today calling to help avert a humanitarian catastrophe in south sudan, somalia, yemen, and north-east nigeria.

more than 20 million people in north-east nigeria, south sudan, somalia and yemen are facing famine or a credible risk of famine over the coming six months. with access to people in need and sufficient funding, the united nations and its partners can avert famine and provide the necessary relief and support where famine already exists.

to avert a humanitarian catastrophe in the four countries over the coming months, the united nations and its partners will continue to scale up humanitarian operations. lifesaving assistance in the areas of food and livelihoods, nutrition, health, and water, sanitation and hygiene will be prioritised as these represent the key sectors of famine response and prevention.

"one of the biggest obstacles we face now is funding. humanitarian operations in these four countries require more than $5.6 billion this year. we need at least $4.4 billion by the end of march to avert a catastrophe. despite some generous pledges, just $90 million has actually been received so far – around two cents for every dollar needed", said un secretary-general antónio guterres today addressing a packed press briefing at un headquarters. "funding shortages have already forced the world food programme to cut rations in yemen by more than half since last year. without new resources, critical shortages will worsen within months."


Information

source: world health organization
country: south sudan

the outbreak poses a significant threat given the security concerns in affected and at-risk locations and the drastic deterioration of the health care infrastructure.

14 february 2017, juba, south sudan - despite the ongoing complex humanitarian crises in south sudan, the world health organization (who) in partnership with the ministry of health and partners are responding to the latest cholera outbreak in the former jonglei and lakes states. the outbreak of cholera was first detected in june 2016 and since then 5 006 cholera cases and 99 deaths (cfr 1.98%) have been reported from 12 counties in nine states countrywide.

“the outbreak poses a significant threat given the security concerns in affected and at-risk locations and the drastic deterioration of the health care infrastructure. currently over 11% of health facilities in the affected locations are non-functional. the national health system’s capacity to respond to the cholera outbreak has been severely compromised by the continuing decline in health system performance due to conflict,” said dr abdulmumini usman, who representative to south sudan.

most cases are currently reported from mingkaman, panyijiar, mayendit, bentiu poc, and bor south. cholera has also been confirmed in shambe, adior, and langmatot in yirol east and duk and twic east in jonglei. the health of these populations is already compromised as a result of food shortages, increased malnutrition and lack of adequate health services. without a sustained multisector response, cases of cholera are likely to increase.

who support to control the cholera outbreak

who and the ministry of health have activated national and sub-national cholera taskforce committees covering overall coordination and resource mobilization; case management, surveillance and laboratory, wash, risk communication and social mobilization, logistics and use of safe and effective oral cholera vaccines. to address the rising need to treat critically affected patients, who and partners deployed the rapid response team to help contain the epidemic and treat those affected.

who with funding from the european civil protection and humanitarian aid operations (echo), the government of japan and the united states agency for international development (usaid) has been supporting the cholera prevention and treatment efforts through provision of supplies including tents and cholera kits, strengthening disease surveillance and comprehensive disease investigation through the deployment of rapid response teams, training community health workers to conduct house-to-house case identification, initiation of treatment with ors and referral to designated treatment centers, establishment of cholera treatment center as well as supporting social mobilization and community engagement activities.

who and health cluster partners has identified nine high-risk idp locations including: bentiu poc, mingkaman, un house poc, bor poc, malakal poc, mayendit north, leer town, panyijiar, and wau poc and idp sites – that will be prioritized for emergency complementary oral cholera vaccination. who has initiated steps to secure the vaccines and lead partners have been identified to deploy the vaccines to the selected idp sites. the oral cholera vaccine requests will be placed in three phases with the first two phases prioritizing idp sites (leer, mayendit, mingkaman, bentiu poc, bor poc, and panyijiar) with active transmission. at least 300,000 doses of oral cholera vaccines for leer and mayendit north have already been requested by who from the emergency stockpile.

as part of the response, who delivered supplies including cholera kits that provide treatment for 700 people, rapid diagnostic test kits, cary blair, backpack, hand sprayer, iv fluids. to improve case detection and treatment of cholera, who has also distributed cholera preparedness and response guidelines.

with the overall goal of reducing mortality and morbidity related to cholera, health cluster partners with support from the common humanitarian funds have supported service delivery through the deployment of rapid response teams to implement the cluster strategy on outbreak response and to ensure accountability to the affected population. health cluster partners have worked on risk assessments and provided micro plans to support the response.

given the overall situation in south sudan, containing the outbreak at an early stage is critical to avoid the spread of the disease. the failure to control the outbreak could have immense public health consequences, straining the overstretched capacity of health services and resulting in an increase of morbidity and mortality.

for more information please contact:

dr allan mpairwe, allan, +211 955 372 370, [email protected]
dr wamala joseph francis, +211955036445, [email protected]
ms magdalene armah, +211955036448, [email protected]
ms jemila m. ebrahim, +211 950 450 007, [email protected]


Information

source: un news service
country: haiti, japan

the $2.6 million grant from japan will help finance interventions across the island nation with an emphasis on the cholera-prone departments of center, north, west, grand'anse, sud (south), and artibonite.

22 february 2017 – a new grant from the government of japan will allow the united nations children’s fund (unicef) to help reduce cholera-related morbidity and mortality in haiti in 2017 and 2018, the un agency said in a news release.

“with this gift from the japanese people, we will strengthen the axes of the fight againstcholera in the protection of the haitian population, especially children,” said marc vincent, unicef representative in haiti, welcoming the contribution.

“japan is a key partner and we thank the japanese people for their continued support,” he added.

haiti has been dealing with a cholera outbreak since october 2010, some nine months after it suffered a devastating earthquake. the outbreak has affected an estimated 788,000 people and claimed the lives of more than 9,000. concerted national and international efforts, backed by the united nations, have resulted in a 90 per cent reduction in the number of suspected cases.

the $2.6 million grant (nearly 300 million japanese yen) will help strengthen the island nation’s epidemiological coordination and surveillance; and support conducting timely surveys, rapid response teams and case management, as well as improving and increasing awareness of cholera-related hygiene.

according to unicef, the cholera epidemic in haiti continues to be the largest in the western hemisphere. more than 41,000 suspected cases of cholera have been reported throughout haiti in 2016.

with the new funds, interventions will be implemented across the island nation with an emphasis on the cholera-prone departments of center, north, west, grand'anse, sud (south), and artibonite.

two of these departments – grand'anse and sud – were where hurricane matthew made landfall in early october, inflicting much devastation as it cut a path of destruction though country.

in the news release, the ambassador of japan to haiti, yoshiaki hatta, said that the grant had been decided upon a resurgence in suspected cholera cases resulting from the deterioration of the sanitary and hygiene situation caused by rainy seasons or natural disasters.

japan considers that this issue should be addressed in collaboration with the government of haiti and the international community, the ambassador added, expressing appreciation for unicef, and calling on all stakeholders to strengthen their collaboration in the fight against cholera.

meanwhile, a multi partner trust fund (mptf) for the un haiti cholera response has been set up to enable member states, other partners and individuals (including un staff) to contribute. to date, it has received funds from five member states: chile ($250,000); france ($638,000); india ($100,000); republic of korea ($1 million); and liechtenstein ($50,000).

as for other resources provided outside of the trust fund, canada has made a $4,600,000 parallel contribution in support of the un haiti cholera response – with some of the funds going to unicef & paho.


Information

source: save the children
country: nigeria

more than seven years of conflict have compounded the world’s worst education crisis in north-east nigeria, says save the children.
  • pre-school classes for under-fives overwhelmed by hundreds of older children

  • one school damaged or destroyed every two days

  • lake chad region home to a quarter of world’s out of school children

  • news comes as un warns of famine in four countries, including nigeria

children as old as 15 are flooding into pre-school facilities in a desperate effort to learn after more than seven years of conflict compounded the world’s worst education crisis in north-east nigeria, says save the children.

a staggering 1,200 schools have been damaged or destroyed whilst at least 611 teachers have been reported murdered and a further 19,000 displaced. this equates to one school being attacked for every two days of the conflict.

more than half of the 700 children attending one save the children pre-school programme in borno state in january 2017 were aged six or older with many teenagers aged up to fifteen. it is symptomatic of an education crisis spread across the lake chad region – nigeria, niger, cameroon and chad – now home to a quarter of the world’s estimated 59 million out-of-school children.

"this desperate quest for education reflects the hunger of children for knowledge that is not being met, which is heart-breaking" said ben foot, save the children’s country director in nigeria.

“this insurgency is based on an ideology that western education is evil and that children, teachers and schools are all legitimate targets,” she added.

“the consequences have been record lows in enrolment, terrible literacy rates and arguably the worst education crisis in the world. we cannot stand by as an entire generation of children loses its right to go to school.”

save the children, whose pre-school facilities are only funded to cater for children under five, says it is adapting its programmes to meet this unexpected demand, but this is only a stop-gap that cannot answer the long term need.

almost three million conflict-affected children are thought to be in need of education in north-east nigeria. even before the start of the conflict, nigeria had the highest number of out-of-school children in the world at more than 10 million, according to the united nations.

with a severe shortage of trained teachers, displaced parents like abu bakar who fled his own home in kukuwa - the site of a deadly insurgent attack that killed at least sixty people – now volunteer as a teacher at save the children’s early childhood care classes in madinatu host community.

“there was a school in my village but because of these insurgent attacks it did not have any students or any children learning,” abu bakar said.

“now, i have some children in my class who are older than five or six so i have changed the way i teach,” he added. “i arrange them according to age so i can sit with them and teach them in a way they will understand.”

“a lot of people are becoming aware of the need for education. some of the children who come here have never been to school. so it makes a difference to the children and for some of them it is the only opportunity they will get [to learn].”

around 80% of some one million children displaced by the conflict are living in remote host communities with little or no access to education. the situation is particularly dire for girls. while the average nigerian can expect to receive nine years of schooling, that figure drops to just two years for girls in the north-east.

fifteen year-old zainab lost her brother during an insurgent attack on her village, forcing her to flee the region and drop out of school. she has been attending save the children emergency pre-school classes in borno state for the last five months.

“i learn english words like ‘hospital’, ‘wagon’, ‘dog’ and ‘window’,” she said. “i feel sad because if this hadn’t happened i would be finishing school by now. some of the children who were in the same school as me have been able to go back and are finished now.”

despite the grave need, education has borne the brunt of a woeful lack of funding for the lake chad crisis. at the end of 2016, education funding for the crisis in north-east nigeria stood at just 18% of total humanitarian funding despite nigerian idps reporting education to be one of the least accessible services. education funding asks have more than doubled from 2016 to 2017.

a major international donor conference taking place in oslo tomorrow is an opportunity to provide much-needed funds to get more children back into school. the conference comes as the united nations warns of the threat of famine in four countries, including nigeria.

“whilst the rate of attacks on education facilities has slowed over the last year, and the government is rebuilding schools, we are not doing enough to strengthen the system and get as many children as possible back into formal education,” ben foot said.

“we need predictable long-term funding for three to five years so that we can scale up our response and work with the nigerian government to give millions of children the chance of an education. this must include marginalized groups who fall off the education radar, such as orphans and children with disabilities.” said ben foot.

save the children’s key education recommendations:

  • more: donors and governments must pledge at least 84 million usd for education for 2017. the majority share of the pledges must be multiyear; predictable long-term funding of at least 3-5 years.

  • better: the humanitarian community must urgently scale up the education response and work with governments and local community with the goal to give 2 million girls and boys - including marginalized groups of children such as orphans and children with disabilities - in the lake chad region are learning and receiving inclusive quality emergency education by end of 201

  • safe - education; including teachers and children are safe and protected from attack. a specific commitment from nigeria to adhere to and implement the safe schools declaration.

notes to editors


Information

source: norwegian refugee council, oxfam
country: cameroon, chad, niger, nigeria

a substantial increase in funds is urgently needed to help more than 7 million people facing hunger in nigeria, niger, chad and cameroon.

aid agencies today warned that lives are at risk unless there is a substantial increase in funds to help over seven million people facing hunger in nigeria, niger, chad and cameroon.

the warning from oxfam and the norwegian refugee council (nrc) comes as the un, governments and donors meet in oslo, norway to pledge funds to tackle the crisis that wracks an area known as the lake chad basin. the un has appealed for $1.5 billion to meet the emergency needs in 2017. last year’s appeal was only 52 per cent funded.

pauline ballaman, oxfam’s head of operations in the lake chad basin area, said: “the risk of famine is real in parts of northern nigeria. millions of people have been pushed to the brink after years of conflict. unable to grow or buy food, or get the help they desperately need, many have died.

"aid has managed to make some people's lives better - but without urgent funding and access to areas where people are cut off from aid, we could see levels of hunger and malnutrition deteriorate further and many more lives lost."

over the last four years the conflict with boko haram has intensified and spread from north east nigeria across the border into niger, chad and cameroon. over 2.6 million people – of which 1.5 million are children – have fled their homes in search of safety and nearly 11 million people are in need of emergency aid. in borno state in northeast nigeria, at least 400,000 people could be living in 'famine-like' conditions.

nigerian government forces have recaptured territory from boko haram and previously cut off areas are now more accessible revealing huge levels of suffering. but the security situation remains fragile and violence continues to make it difficult for oxfam and other agencies to get help to all the people who need it. some areas remain completely inaccessible to humanitarian organizations because of ongoing military operations or because they are still under the control of boko haram

meanwhile the government has announced it intends to close all camps hosting displaced people by may 2017. many of them are already returning to areas still surrounded by fighting. some find their home villages are still too dangerous, leaving them to seek shelter in nearby towns where there is often widespread destruction and few services or assistance available.

cheick ba, country director for nrc nigeria, said: “we are seeing convoys of displaced people being moved back into towns the government recently reclaimed, even as fresh violence in the surrounding areas forces more people to flee. people tell us they want to go home, but only when it’s safe. we need to hear real commitment from the authorities that no one will be encouraged to go home until there is lasting security and basic services have been restored.”

people continue to experience horrific levels of human rights abuses and threats including sexual violence, abductions, killings, torture, forced recruitment, forced disappearance and arbitrary detention. in north east nigeria, nearly one in three women report having experienced sexual violence.

military and political objectives in the fight against boko haram have trumped humanitarian concerns. collectively, governments, humanitarian organizations, and donors were slow to respond to this crisis. a large humanitarian operation is now underway and many lives have been saved. but without a massive injection of aid many lives could be lost.

  1. for full details of the oslo humanitarian conference on nigeria and the lake chad region: http://oslohumanitarianconference2017.org

for interviews and further information, please contact:

at oxfam:
christina corbett [email protected] | +234 (0) 802 896 8039 | +234 (0) 907 461 7371
ian bray [email protected] | +44 (0)1865 472289 | +44 (0)7721 461339)

at the norwegian refugee council:
tuva raanes bogsnes | head of media and communication |
[email protected] | +47 93231883. we have staff in north-eastern nigeria available for interview.


Information

source: un secretary-general, un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: nigeria, somalia, south sudan, yemen

"one of the biggest obstacles we face is funding," said antónio guterres, as he joined other top un officials today calling to help avert a humanitarian catastrophe in south sudan, somalia, yemen, and north-east nigeria.

more than 20 million people in north-east nigeria, south sudan, somalia and yemen are facing famine or a credible risk of famine over the coming six months. with access to people in need and sufficient funding, the united nations and its partners can avert famine and provide the necessary relief and support where famine already exists.

to avert a humanitarian catastrophe in the four countries over the coming months, the united nations and its partners will continue to scale up humanitarian operations. lifesaving assistance in the areas of food and livelihoods, nutrition, health, and water, sanitation and hygiene will be prioritised as these represent the key sectors of famine response and prevention.

"one of the biggest obstacles we face now is funding. humanitarian operations in these four countries require more than $5.6 billion this year. we need at least $4.4 billion by the end of march to avert a catastrophe. despite some generous pledges, just $90 million has actually been received so far – around two cents for every dollar needed", said un secretary-general antónio guterres today addressing a packed press briefing at un headquarters. "funding shortages have already forced the world food programme to cut rations in yemen by more than half since last year. without new resources, critical shortages will worsen within months."

the united nations is also stepping up cooperation between humanitarian and development partners. strengthening such links, we are seeking not only to save lives but to build the resilience necessary for people to withstand future shocks.

effective and efficient humanitarian delivery relies on access to reach people in need. the un and its partners call for full, safe and unimpeded access to all those in need, wherever they are.

"the lives of millions of people depend on our collective ability to act", mr guterres stressed. "we have heard the alerts. now there is no time to lose."

north-east nigeria

  • 5.1 million people urgently need food and livelihoods assistance

  • 450,000 children suffering severe acute malnutrition

  • in 2016, humanitarian partners reached more than 2.3 million people with food and agriculture assistance and 1.1 million with water, sanitation and hygiene assistance

south sudan

  • 100,000 people already facing famine

  • 1 million people on the brink of famine

  • 5 million people urgently need food and livelihoods assistance

  • 270,000 children suffering severe acute malnutrition

  • in 2016, humanitarian partners reached more than 5 million people with aid, including nearly 3.6 million with food assistance or emergency livelihoods support and more than 2 million people with access to clean water

somalia

  • 2.9 million people urgently need food and livelihoods assistance

  • 185,000 children suffering severe acute malnutrition

  • in 2016, humanitarian partners reached over one million people with food and livelihoods support, treated nearly 140,000 children for severe acute malnutrition, and provided water and sanitation to over one million people

yemen

  • 7.3 million people urgently need food assistance

  • 462,000 children suffering severe acute malnutrition

  • humanitarian partners reached 5.3 million people with assistance in 2016, including an average of 3.8 million people with food assistance every month and 5.3 million people with direct health services


Information

source: norwegian refugee council, oxfam
country: cameroon, chad, niger, nigeria

a substantial increase in funds is urgently needed to help more than 7 million people facing hunger in nigeria, niger, chad and cameroon, according to nrc and oxfam.

aid agencies today warned that lives are at risk unless there is a substantial increase in funds to help over seven million people facing hunger in nigeria, niger, chad and cameroon.

the warning from oxfam and the norwegian refugee council (nrc) comes as the un, governments and donors meet in oslo, norway to pledge funds to tackle the crisis that wracks an area known as the lake chad basin. the un has appealed for $1.5 billion to meet the emergency needs in 2017. last year’s appeal was only 52 per cent funded.

pauline ballaman, oxfam’s head of operations in the lake chad basin area, said: “the risk of famine is real in parts of northern nigeria. millions of people have been pushed to the brink after years of conflict. unable to grow or buy food, or get the help they desperately need, many have died.

"aid has managed to make some people's lives better - but without urgent funding and access to areas where people are cut off from aid, we could see levels of hunger and malnutrition deteriorate further and many more lives lost."

over the last four years the conflict with boko haram has intensified and spread from north east nigeria across the border into niger, chad and cameroon. over 2.6 million people – of which 1.5 million are children – have fled their homes in search of safety and nearly 11 million people are in need of emergency aid. in borno state in northeast nigeria, at least 400,000 people could be living in 'famine-like' conditions.

nigerian government forces have recaptured territory from boko haram and previously cut off areas are now more accessible revealing huge levels of suffering. but the security situation remains fragile and violence continues to make it difficult for oxfam and other agencies to get help to all the people who need it. some areas remain completely inaccessible to humanitarian organizations because of ongoing military operations or because they are still under the control of boko haram

meanwhile the government has announced it intends to close all camps hosting displaced people by may 2017. many of them are already returning to areas still surrounded by fighting. some find their home villages are still too dangerous, leaving them to seek shelter in nearby towns where there is often widespread destruction and few services or assistance available.

cheick ba, country director for nrc nigeria, said: “we are seeing convoys of displaced people being moved back into towns the government recently reclaimed, even as fresh violence in the surrounding areas forces more people to flee. people tell us they want to go home, but only when it’s safe. we need to hear real commitment from the authorities that no one will be encouraged to go home until there is lasting security and basic services have been restored.”

people continue to experience horrific levels of human rights abuses and threats including sexual violence, abductions, killings, torture, forced recruitment, forced disappearance and arbitrary detention. in north east nigeria, nearly one in three women report having experienced sexual violence.

military and political objectives in the fight against boko haram have trumped humanitarian concerns. collectively, governments, humanitarian organizations, and donors were slow to respond to this crisis. a large humanitarian operation is now underway and many lives have been saved. but without a massive injection of aid many lives could be lost.

  1. for full details of the oslo humanitarian conference on nigeria and the lake chad region: http://oslohumanitarianconference2017.org

for interviews and further information, please contact:

at oxfam:
christina corbett [email protected] | +234 (0) 802 896 8039 | +234 (0) 907 461 7371
ian bray [email protected] | +44 (0)1865 472289 | +44 (0)7721 461339)

at the norwegian refugee council:
tuva raanes bogsnes | head of media and communication |
[email protected] | +47 93231883. we have staff in north-eastern nigeria available for interview.


Information

source: un high commissioner for refugees
country: south sudan, uganda

the new imvepi settlement area is expected to be able to accommodate up to 110,000 new arrivals. more than 2,000 south sudanese have made imvepi their home in the last two days.

unhcr and partners have opened a new settlement area in arua district, northern uganda that is set to become host to thousands of arriving refugees from south sudan. the new imvepi settlement was opened after palorinya settlement in moyo district, which was opened in december 2016, rapidly reached its 135,000 refugee-hosting capacity.

with thousands of new arrivals fleeing to uganda every day, south sudan is now africa’s largest refugee crisis and the world’s third after syria and afghanistan – with less attention and chronic levels of underfunding.

the new imvepi settlement area has been identified as it is expected to be able to accommodate up to 110,000 new arrivals who flee to uganda in the weeks and months ahead. imvepi was considered a suitable location for the new settlement as some of the previous infrastructure remains intact from when the area was previously utilized to host south sudanese refugees.

more than 2,000 south sudanese refugees have already made imvepi their new home in the last two days, where, in line with uganda’s progressive approach to asylum, they will live side by side with members of the ugandan host community. unhcr highly commends the generosity of the host community in imvepi, who have come together to donate the land on which the settlement will be hosted. this gesture is an exceptional display of solidarity with people who have been forced to leave everything behind due to war and conflict.

upon arrival, refugees from south sudan receive a plot of land on which to build their new homes and grow crops. refugees additionally are free to access public services such as healthcare and education.

in recognition of the additional strain being placed on local services, and of the generosity of host communities, around 30% (as a guiding principle) of the resources of the humanitarian response goes towards benefiting host communities. this is typically realised through improvements to local infrastructure that that not only bolsters the capacity to assist the refugees, but is also carried out in a way that continues to benefit ugandans even after its safe for the refugees to return home.

more than 1.5 million south sudanese refugees have fled to neighbouring countries in the region, around half of which are located in uganda. more than two-thirds of south sudanese refugees living in uganda have arrived since the outbreak of violence in juba in july 2016. currently, the influx shows little sign of abating, with more than 116,000 south sudanese refugees having fled to uganda in 2017 alone.

recent new arrivals report suffering inside south sudan with intense fighting, kidnappings, rape, fears of armed groups and threats to life, as well as acute food shortage.

the humanitarian response continues to face significant challenges in light of chronic and severe underfunding. the humanitarian response for south sudanese refugees in uganda in 2016 received just 40% of the us$251million requested, compromising the abilities of the response to provide vital aid. for 2017, the humanitarian response has requested us$558 million. in addition, unhcr is appealing to all parties in the conflict to urgently act to bring a peaceful resolution to the crisis.

end

for more information on this topic, please contact:
charlie yaxley, unhcr uganda: [email protected]; +256 776 720 045


Information

source: world health organization
country: yemen

only 45% of health facilities in yemen are fully functional and accessible, 38% are partially functional and 17% are non-functional. at least 274 of those facilities have been damaged or destroyed during the conflict.

23 february 2017, al-hudaydah, yemen - “hospital staff have not received their salaries for the past 5 months. there are acute shortages of certain medicines and we need more fuel to ensure the hospital has electricity,” says dr khaled suhail, director of al-tharwa hospital in yemen’s third largest city, al-hudaydah.

with more than 1200 employees and 320 beds, al-thawra hospital is the main functioning health facility in al-hudaydah and neighbouring governorates.

every day, around 1500 people seek care at the hospital, a 5-fold increase since 2012 due to the influx of people displaced by ongoing conflict and the closure of other health facilities in the area.

last week alone, several thousand displaced men, women and children arrived in al-hudaydah governorate, overwhelming already weakened health facilities and overburdening vulnerable host communities.

the al-hudaydah port, one of the main entry points to the country, is functioning at minimal capacity, significantly increasing the prices of goods, including medicines, and reducing economic activity in the city. as a result, many patients are unable to pay the minimal fees for hospital services.

despite this, no one is turned away from al-thawra hospital and hospital staff provide care to everyone, regardless of whether they can afford to pay. recently, however, the hospital had to stop providing food for inpatients due to lack of funds.

“the world health organization (who) assists us by providing fuel and medicines for emergency interventions, and supporting the hospital’s therapeutic feeding centre.” explains dr suhail. “however, with no funds for operational costs, we never know if we will still be open one month from now.”

collapsing health system in yemen

since the escalation of the conflict in march 2015, health facilities across yemen have reported more than 7600 deaths and close to 42 000 people injured. the country’s health system has been another victim of the conflict.

the budget allocated to health authorities has been drastically reduced, leaving health facilities without funds for operational costs and health care workers without regular salaries since september 2016.

“with more than 14.8 million people lacking access to basic health care, the current lack of funds means the situation will get much worse,” says dr nevio zagaria, who acting representative in yemen.

only 45% of health facilities in yemen are fully functional and accessible, 38% are partially functional and 17% are non-functional. at least 274 of those facilities have been damaged or destroyed during the current conflict. highly specialized medical staff, such as intensive care unit doctors, psychiatrists and foreign nurses have left the country.

nutrition crisis

almost 4.5 million people in yemen, including 2 million children, require services to treat or prevent malnutrition, representing a 150% increase since late 2014. of special concern are almost 462 000 children suffering from severe acute malnutrition and at risk of life-threatening complications such as respiratory infections or organ failure.

“last year more than 100 children died from severe malnutrition in our therapeutic feeding centre” says dr suhail. “the majority of children who come here are from al-hudaydah city itself. those from outside the city can’t afford the cost of transport, so many children simply die at home.”

who has established 15 therapeutic feeding centres in 7 governorates, and plans to open an additional 25 centres as the numbers of malnourished children increases across the country.

urgent funding needs

“we are asked to fill gaps created by the collapsing health institutions,” says dr zagaria, “but last year, who received less than half of the us$ 124 million required.”

this year united nations agencies and nongovernmental organizations working to support health care in yemen are appealing for us$ 322 million, of which who is requesting us$ 126 million.

“we urgently need resources to help support the health system as a whole, and are calling on donors to scale-up their support before more innocent lives are lost unnecessarily,” says dr zagaria.

media contact:

tarik jasarevic media relations
world health organization
mobile: +41 793 676 214
e-mail: [email protected]


Information

source: un mission in south sudan
country: south sudan

david shearer made his first field trip to yambio town in western equatoria, an agricultural region that has typically provided a wide range of food products for the rest of the country.

improved security is essential to reinvigorating what has been called the bread basket of south sudan, the head of the un mission in south sudan (unmiss), david shearer, has said.

mr shearer was making his first field trip to the town of yambio in the western equatoria region of south sudan, an agricultural region which has typically provided a wide range of food products for the rest of the country.

production has slowed because farmers are no longer able to plant crops due to ongoing insecurity and displacement.

“security is the key to getting famers back to their land,” mr shearer said after meeting gbudwe state officials in yambio. he said that security was also essential on the road network to allow trade and the distribution of agricultural products.

he praised the state authorities for their commitment to boosting agricultural production and moving towards self-sufficiency.

unmiss hopes the imminent swearing-in of the new governor of gbudwe state will be an opportunity to reset and improve relations between local communities and government forces operating there, mr shearer said.

the unmiss head is also encouraging reconciliation efforts by the state authorities, especially the efforts to reintegrate young people into the community who had joined armed groups active in the area.


for media enquiries, please contact
spokesperson: daniel dickinson – [email protected] +211912177770
united nations mission in south sudan – communications & public information section
https://unmiss.unmissions.org/


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: cameroon, chad, niger, nigeria

with 8.2 million people in need of urgent assistance in the most affected areas, agencies gathering at the oslo conference tomorrow call for us$1.5 billion to provide essential services and rebuild livelihoods.

2016 saw a significant scale-up in the response across the worst-hit areas of the lake chad region. owing to the support of donors and collective efforts by governments, un agencies and non-governmental organisations, children were rescued from malnutrition, vaccinated against life-threatening diseases and able to access education. families on the move were sheltered and provided with help. communities were assisted with food or livelihoods to avoid hunger.

across the lake chad region

  • up to 1.6 million people received life-saving food and nutrition support
  • over 1 million children were vaccinated against measles
  • 4.4 million people. accessed emergency primary health care
  • 1.4 million farmers and pastoralists received the means to resume their livelihoods
  • almost 300,000 boys and girls out of school resumed their education despite the odds
  • 2.3 million displaced families and their host: were provided with access to safe water, improved sanitation and hygiene
  • 300,000 children under 5 and nursing mothers were treated for malnutrition, including 194,000 severely acutely malnourished children at risk of dying
  • 300,000 infants received adequate food to prevent malnutrition in worst-hit areas
  • 492,000 children who faced trauma benefitted from essential psychosocial support
  • 8,200 children separated from their families or unaccompanied received care
  • 6,000 women and children associated with armed groups or who survived gender-based violence were assisted
  • almost 420,000 pupils received learning materials to continue their education
  • 75,000 refugees were registered and received identification documents
  • 97% of refugee families living in camps across the region have access to adequate dwellings
  • 4 governments of the region adopted the abuja action statement which spells out concrete actions to address immediate protection needs and design durable solutions

cameroon

despite persisting insecurity and large numbers of displaced persons living in hard to reach areas, some 200,000 people received life-saving food or cash assistance. at least 33,500 famers and herders received seeds, tools and support to improve their food security. almost 335,000 people were provided with access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene services. 28,000 children under five were treated for severe acute malnutrition, and 43,000 children received learning support.

chad

seizing the opportunity of significant improvements in humanitarian access and scaled-up operational capacities, some 30 humanitarian partners assisted 127,000 people with food assistance and 94,000 people with cash transfers. '0,000 children under five affected by severe acute malnutrition were treated. niger despite persisting insecurity and access challenges, 58 humanitarian organizations are currently working in diffa. since 2015, 70,000 tons of foods were distributed. humanitarian actors provided shelters to 120,000 people in 2016, while half a million people received potable water and hygiene support.over 240 schools were re-localised to safer areas and emergency education provided to 45,000 school-aged children. almost 90,000 children received psychological support.

nigeria

as areas previously cut off from aid have become accessible, relief actors also discovered new depths of needs and significantly scaled up aid delivery. food assistance increased over four-fold in the past six months, reaching an average of 1 million persons each month. over 4 million people accessed primary healthcare, 1.7 million benefitted from safe access to water, hygiene and sanitation, and 736,000 people received basic household items or vouchers to purchase them. one million children were vaccinated against measles and 160,000 treated for severe acute malnutrition. 1.7 million people, of which many children, received protection services including legal aid or psycho-social counselling. 1.5 million men, women, boys and girls accessed contraceptives and other sexual and reproductive services.


Information

source: international federation of red cross and red crescent societies
country: peru

the red cross is responding to the flooding that has particularly affected the provinces of chiclayo and lambayeque, leaving more than 46,000 people homeless.

situation analysis

description of the disaster:

there has been nationwide flooding in peru, which has affected 376,562 people, left 46,384 homeless, damaged 81,263 dwellings, rendered 5,541 dwellings uninhabitable and caused 4,393 dwellings to collapse throughout the country, according to indeci’s national emergency operations centre (coen for its acronym in spanish)’s report from 21 february 2017. currently, strong rainfall and electrical storms are being registered in the departments of huánuco, pasco, junín, ucayali and cusco (la convención).

similarly, moderate to strong rainfall and lightning are being recorded in the provinces of sullana, talara, paita and piura in the department of piura; however, the intensity of the storm activity’s intensity has begun to diminish.

on 1 to 2 february 2017, there was heavy rainfall (115 litres per meter2) for approximately 14 consecutive hours in the province of chiclayo, which produced a total of 510,000 cubic meters of rainfall. the magnitude of the rainfall can only be compared to that caused by the el niño phenomenon on 14 february 1998 . the intense rains have affected a total of 32 districts in the provinces of lambayeque, ferreñafe and chiclayo, causing outages in electrical service and the water system and many sections of the sewer system to collapse; moreover, the collection of solid waste has been halted, causing contamination and the appearance of vectors in the areas most affected by the flooding.

due to the intense rainfall, an increase in the volume and flow of the la leche river was registered on 3 february 2017, flooding houses and roads. the national police reported that after the river overflowed, an inter-provincial bus rolled over at the district of mórrope toll post.

more than 12,000 houses in the department of lambayeque have been affected due to their construction style, which by and large were adobe (mud with straw) or due to the partial infiltration of water in houses built with more solid construction materials (concrete, cement and brick). families have been forced to take refuge in the homes of relatives and rescue the few belongings that remain; other families are living outdoors as they do not have anywhere to take refuge. to date, no deaths nor disappearances have been reported.

by means of supreme decree # 011-2017-pcm in the departments of tumbes, piura and lambayeque, which is valid for 6 calendar days, the peruvian government declared a state of emergency due to the intense rainfall; this allowed for the implementation of immediate and necessary actions, response measures and the corresponding rehabilitation.

through the joint command, ministry of transportation and communications, ministry of health and ministry of defence staff at the emergency operations centres (eocs) are currently coordinating the sub-regional offices with the goal of carrying out response actions. the head of the provincial municipality of lambayeque’s civil defence office reported that the inhabitants of the impacted dwellings and members of the peruvian army are continuing to clean and remove water from the affected houses and roads in the districts of pacora, jayanca, illimo, mochumi and túcume. in addition, the damage assessment and needs analysis (dana) is ongoing in the affected districts.
on 4 february 2017, staff from the ministry of transportation and communications’ eoc reported that flooding caused a partial collapse of the pan-american highway north section of lambayeque – piura (sector km 835); repairs are still being carried out.


Information

source: european commission's directorate-general for european civil protection and humanitarian aid operations
country: cameroon, chad, niger, nigeria

the european commission has already allocated €55 million to populations in the lake chad region in 2017 and is now planning to mobilise additional funding for a total of €105 million.

the european commission has announced additional assistance for the lake chad region in 2017 as humanitarian needs grow.

the european commission has already allocated €55 million of humanitarian support to populations in the lake chad region in africa in 2017 and is now planning to mobilise additional funding to the amount of €50 million to step up its support to a total of €105 million.

commissioner for humanitarian aid and crisis management christos stylianides made the announcement today during an international conference in oslo, norway, aimed at addressing the pressing humanitarian situation in the region.

"with the crisis in the lake chad region growing at an extremely alarming rate, the eu is stepping up its response. today i announced the eu will allocate €105 million in humanitarian aid for the crisis. these funds will help meet the life-saving needs of the affected populations and scale up our response. the conditions for delivering assistance remain particularly difficult. it is essential to ensure quick and safe access to people who need lifesaving assistance." said commissioner stylianides.

the funding would help meet the increasing humanitarian needs, notably in the following five areas of food, nutrition, water and sanitation, health and protection.

the european union has been one of the largest aid donors to the crisis in region. since january 2016, €177 million has been provided in humanitarian aid and a further €159 million in development assistance from the eu emergency trust fund for africa has recently been allocated to support 15 projects.

background

the conflict between security forces and the armed group boko haram is having devastating humanitarian consequences in the lake chad basin. the crisis is heavily affecting populations in nigeria, niger, chad and cameroon. over 2.3 million people have been displaced within or out of their country.

food insecurity has reached crisis levels in some parts of the region, and malnutrition rates are well beyond emergency levels defined by the world health organization (who). in nigeria's northeast region alone, some 4.6 million people are in need of emergency food assistance. access to basic services is severely limited and the risk of epidemics due to the lack of water, sanitation, shelter and health services also remains extremely high.

high levels of insecurity across the area continue to seriously hamper humanitarian access. the consequence of which is the difficulty of delivering aid, in particular to northeast nigeria, the extreme north of cameroon and the diffa region in niger.


Information

source: un children's fund
country: ethiopia

mobile health and nutrition teams were set up over a decade ago in somali region as a unique component of the emergency health service delivery system to reach nomadic families.

by rebecca beauregard

gashamo, somali, 15 february 2017 – mutas does not look at his mother. he is not looking anywhere, rather he lays still, his unfocused pupils covered occasionally by heavy eyelids. while we talk, his mother, bedra dek, keeps her eyes entirely on him. her one-year-old son is suffering from severe acute malnutrition (sam) and despite the food and water shortage and her two other children, she explains that all her thoughts are focused on him improving.

“when your child is well, spiritually you feel happy. this is what i am waiting and hoping for. nothing else is in my mind except this,” bedra speaks softly, her eyes never wavering from her son.

about six months ago, mutas became sick with a cold. since then, he has fought that illness and intermittent diarrhoea while they lived in remote rural areas. living in remote areas means even farther than where we are now, which is over 300 km from the regional capital and 63 km off the paved road through desert sand – no roads. bedra walked yet another 15 km to the settlement just outside al-bahi kebele (sub-district) after hearing that there was a mobile health and nutrition team (mhnt) providing lifesaving services. she knew mutas was not improving, and indeed, shortly after her arrival, he had become lethargic and largely unresponsive.

at 21-years-old, bedra has 7- and 4-year-old daughters in addition to mutas. they are a pastoralist family, living in a rural village and often traveling vast kilometres in search of water and grazing land for their livestock.

while the semi-arid somali region is often dry, the drought brought on by the negative indian ocean dipole (iod) in the past few months is beyond anything bedra has experienced. her family’s herd of over 200 goats and sheep is now down to four, and their physical appearance is too poor to sell in the market.

upon arriving in al bahi, she went to the mhnt, which has temporarily set up as a static clinic in the site to service the hundreds of families in the area. mhnts were initially set up over a decade ago in this region as a unique and necessary component of the emergency health service delivery system to reach nomadic families such as bedra’s. they respond to disease outbreaks, provide routine immunizations and basic healthcare including treatment of common illnesses, conduct screening and manage uncomplicated cases of malnutrition as well as refer to higher levels of care as necessary. here, the team has encountered high levels of malnutrition and the majority of children have low immunization status. the team is both responding to emergency care needs as well as conducting mass immunization and other preventative measures to ensure that a temporary settlement like this does not create further disease and suffering.

once a child is diagnosed with sam, they are provided with ready-to-use-therapeutic-food (rutf) and medications which should help them to quickly improve. to ensure progress, mothers are instructed to come weekly to have their children checked. we meet bedra, as she waits with mutas for his weekly check.

unicef continues to support the goe’s mhnts through vehicle provision, transportation allowances, emergency supplies and technical guidance. unicef emergency health and monitoring consultant, kassim hussein, was present when mutas was referred. when asked about his role, he explained how he roves around the region providing technical support. “during emergencies, things may be done in a haste, there may be staffing or technical knowledge gaps, or the situation may reach extreme levels and the team is too busy to report. i make rounds to all the teams, providing technical support and ensuring standards of care and supplies are available at adequate levels. i then report back to unicef and the regional health bureau,” explains kassim.

now mutas is being seen by mohammed miyir, the team leader of the mhnt in al-bahi temporary settlement. originally, he diagnosed mutas with sam; now his condition has developed medical complications, making him unable to receive fluids or medicine. this development signals the need for him to be sent to a stabilization centre (sc) at the gashamo woreda (district) health centre, where he will receive in-patient advanced care until he reaches a minimal level of improvement in his responsiveness and weight.

bedra is perplexed. just minutes before they told her this news, she had said she wanted anything for him to improve. now that it may happen, a new reality hit her. her two daughters will need to be left behind – there is no room in the mhnt car. this is often an issue mothers out here face. with husbands caring for the grazing livestock, if they need to go to a sc for further treatment, who will take care of their other children? some find neighbours to watch their kids, other mothers choose to stay and hope for the best, concerned about finding their children again as people are so mobile.

for bedra, she has another 10 minutes to decide until the car will be ready for her.


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: cameroon, chad, denmark, finland, france, germany, ireland, italy, japan, luxembourg, netherlands, niger, nigeria, norway, republic of korea, sweden, switzerland

humanitarian partners agreed to further scale up their response to reach the most vulnerable groups threatened by famine, including children with severe acute malnutrition. nearly 11 million people urgently need humanitarian assistance.
  • pledges of us$458 million for 2017 and $214 million for 2018 and beyond announced by 14 donors

  • the conference gave voice to people affected by the conflict and crisis

  • agreement to address longer-term development needs and seek durable solutions to crises

oslo 24 february 2017 - some 170 representatives from 40 countries, un, regional organisations and civil society organisations gathered at the oslo humanitarian conference on nigeria and the lake chad region today. the conference was co-hosted by norway, nigeria, germany and the un and followed a civil society meeting with large participation from local organisations working in nigeria, chad, niger and cameroon.

one of the world’s largest humanitarian crises is currently unfolding in the lake chad region with 17 million people living in the most affected areas. nearly 11 million people urgently need humanitarian assistance. at the conference, 14 donors pledged $458 million for relief in 2017 and an additional $214 million was announced for 2018 and beyond. pledges were announced by the european commission, norway, germany, japan, sweden, switzerland, france, italy, ireland, finland, denmark, luxembourg, netherlands and republic of korea.

humanitarian partners agreed to further scale up their response to reach the most vulnerable groups threatened by famine, including children with severe acute malnutrition. special attention was given to the protection needs of women, children and youth, as well as the need for longer-term support and durable solutions for the displaced populations.

foreign minister borge brende of norway said:

“the conference has helped raising awareness and increased support for millions of people affected by this crisis, not least for the many children and young people who are currently out of school. it is crucial to provide and protect education to safeguard their rights and pave the way for a peaceful development in the region. our goal must be to ensure quality education for all, for girls as much as for boys. it is of critical importance also to enhance the protection of women and girls, who often carry the main burden of crisis and conflict, and ensure that women are involved in ongoing processes related to peace and development in the region.”

the foreign minister of nigeria, geoffrey onyeama, said:

“nigeria is suffering from violent extremism at the same time as it is dealing with low oil prices and an economic recession. while the government is committing significant budgetary allocations to confront the security and humanitarian situation arising from the insurgency, we also need all the help and support we can get from the international community.”

the foreign minister of germany, sigmar gabriel, said:

“with today’s pledges, humanitarian agencies can now concentrate on their work – to save lives and offer help to those in urgent need. germany contributes 120 million euro over the course of the next three years to those efforts. we will provide 100 million euro for humanitarian assistance and 20 million euro for stabilization efforts in the region. in the long run, we have to strengthen our partnership with the countries involved to address the root causes of terror, displacement and poverty. for that purpose, we established today a consultative group on prevention and stabilisation with our counterparts from the region.”

united nations under-secretary-general for humanitarian affairs and emergency relief coordinator stephen o’brien said:

“the humanitarian crisis in the lake chad region is truly massive with a staggering 10.7 million people in need of immediate humanitarian assistance. without our increased support, affected communities will face a life of hunger, disease, gender-based violence and continued displacement. but there is another future within grasp: as the international community scales up support, we can stop a further descent into an ever-deepening crisis with unimaginable consequences for millions of people. i am grateful for the generous support to humanitarian action we have heard this morning. the un and our partners are ready and mobilised to further scale up our life-saving response - the people in the region have no time to wait.”


Information

source: european commission's directorate-general for european civil protection and humanitarian aid operations
country: cameroon, chad, niger, nigeria

the european commission has already allocated €55 million to populations in the lake chad region in 2017 and is now planning to mobilise additional funding for a total of €105 million.

the european commission has announced additional assistance for the lake chad region in 2017 as humanitarian needs grow.

the european commission has already allocated €55 million of humanitarian support to populations in the lake chad region in africa in 2017 and is now planning to mobilise additional funding to the amount of €50 million to step up its support to a total of €105 million.

commissioner for humanitarian aid and crisis management christos stylianides made the announcement today during an international conference in oslo, norway, aimed at addressing the pressing humanitarian situation in the region.

"with the crisis in the lake chad region growing at an extremely alarming rate, the eu is stepping up its response. today i announced the eu will allocate €105 million in humanitarian aid for the crisis. these funds will help meet the life-saving needs of the affected populations and scale up our response. the conditions for delivering assistance remain particularly difficult. it is essential to ensure quick and safe access to people who need lifesaving assistance." said commissioner stylianides.

the funding would help meet the increasing humanitarian needs, notably in the following five areas of food, nutrition, water and sanitation, health and protection.

the european union has been one of the largest aid donors to the crisis in region. since january 2016, €177 million has been provided in humanitarian aid and a further €159 million in development assistance from the eu emergency trust fund for africa has recently been allocated to support 15 projects.

background

the conflict between security forces and the armed group boko haram is having devastating humanitarian consequences in the lake chad basin. the crisis is heavily affecting populations in nigeria, niger, chad and cameroon. over 2.3 million people have been displaced within or out of their country.

food insecurity has reached crisis levels in some parts of the region, and malnutrition rates are well beyond emergency levels defined by the world health organization (who). in nigeria's northeast region alone, some 4.6 million people are in need of emergency food assistance. access to basic services is severely limited and the risk of epidemics due to the lack of water, sanitation, shelter and health services also remains extremely high.

high levels of insecurity across the area continue to seriously hamper humanitarian access. the consequence of which is the difficulty of delivering aid, in particular to northeast nigeria, the extreme north of cameroon and the diffa region in niger.


Information

source: handicap international
country: iraq

since early january, handicap international destroyed more than 1000 explosives in kirkuk and diyala. iraq is one of the most contaminated countries in the world after the decades of war.

after decades of conflict, iraq is now one of the most contaminated countries in the world. since early january, handicap international's weapons clearance teams have identified, collected, and destroyed more than 1,000 explosives in the governorates of kirkuk and diyala, areas severely affected by the war.

“we have trained several specialized teams–each containing about thirty people–to destroy explosive remnants of war in two areas of iraq,” explains alberto casero gómez-pastrana, handicap international’s chief of operations for mine action in iraq.

our teams conduct several types of operations and determine the safest way to destroy explosive devices. “for example, we do grouped disposals when destroying dozens of explosive devices in areas identified and secured in advance,” alberto explains.

“but some explosive devices can’t be moved and have to be destroyed where they were originally placed. these situations end up being a long process because we have to destroy the devices one-by-one.”

despite the outstanding progress our teams have made since starting operations, the village of basheer–in the governorate of kirkuk–is still highly contaminated. in 2015, the islamic state captured basheer, and six hundred families fled.

in may 2016, the army retook the village and since then, some 60 families have returned to their homes. our teams are committed to giving the land back to the people of iraq, and in the meantime, keep them safe in their local communities by educating both children and adults on the dangers of explosive weapons through risk education.

learn more about handicap international's work in iraq and read the latest syrian/iraqi crisis situation report (feb. 2017).


Information

source: international federation of red cross and red crescent societies
country: guinea

being nearly overwhelmed by ebola virus disease outbreak during the period of 2014-2016, health workers could hardly implement prevention activities for other diseases.

a. situation analysis

description of the disaster

with a population of 10,628,9992 inhabitants according to the 2014, general population census, the republic of guinea is faced with countless challenges including viral and infections disease outbreaks. during the period 2014-2016, the country’s health system underwent ebola virus disease outbreak with disruptive effect on health services along with degrading confidence in health services.

being nearly overwhelmed by the evd outbreak the responses, healthcare workers could hardly follow-up and implement surveillance, prevention and management activities for other diseases. the failure to give attention to the diseases resulted into increased upsurge of vacccine preventable diseases outstandingly the miseasles. as a comparison, in the 2014, the countryexperianced a measles outbreak which affected 25 health dictricts.

surveillance of the disease shows that since early 2016, despite interventions (conduct of indepth investigations and management of cases, response organization in the health districts, enhanced surveillance, providing health districts with vaccines and supplies, community awareness in measles), the confirmed cases were continuously reported in several health districts. in 2017, 408 suspected measles cases reported with 122 confirmed. the following prefectures are affected: nzérékoré, gueckedou, matoto, ratoma, fria, dubreka, kindia, coyah, kaloum, dixinn, forécariah and matam. the prefectures of siguiri, labé and boké are on alert. the red cross of guinea will target 3 of the most affected areas with social mobilization campaign.

it also seeks support from technical and financial partners to rapidly eradicate the measles before the months of execessive heat which leads to the rapid spread of measles.

summary of the current response

overview of host national society theministry of health, in collaboration with partners, provides clinical management of the the measles cases reported in health facilities. given the magnitude of the situation, the ministry of health with support of the partners including the guinean red cross plans to:

  • coordinate and monitor the response activities against the outbreak.

  • support all suspect and confirmed cases.

  • vaccinate at least 95% of children aged 6 months to 14 years against measles in the affected health districts.

  • provide catch up vaccination for at least 50% of unvaccinated or poorly vaccinated children under 23 months in routine epi.

  • administer a dose of vitamin a to at least 95% of children aged 6 months to 5 years in each health district.

  • administer a dose of mebendazole to at least 95% of children aged 12 months to 14 years in each health district affected.

  • timely detect and report all suspect cases.

  • provide support to the national public health laboratory (lnsp).

  • ensure record and management of all cases of advert event following vaccination.

  • raise awareness among 100% of the populations in the areas to be vaccinated, and - strengthen the epi-surveillance.

the guinean red cross has a fully equipped national headquarter with a qualified personnel. participation into the response to evd with the technical support provided by ifrc helped to enhance managerial capacities and strengthen logistic system including warehousing, more than 40 four-wheel-drive vehicles.

with over estimated 17,000 registred volunteers, the guinean red cross prides itself with volunteers and technical staff with proven experience in response to epidemics.

the guinean red cross supported by ifrc office in guinea is a member of the outbreak management committee chaired by the guinea national agency for health safety (anss in french accronym). it is composed of volunteers from the affected areas for the upcoming immunization campaign.
the head of health and care department of the national society participates in partnership meetings with the ministry of health, unicef, who, alima, msf and other local partners. the meetings aim at discussing mechanisms for prevention, response and information sharing.

in 2014, thanks to their involvement into the response to the measles outbreak (through a dref of february to april 2014) which recorded approximately 5,000 cases with 3,000 in conakry, the guinean red cross has a network of well trained volunteers and technical staff in terms of community mobilization, case reporting and porting cases technique of. a refresher training will be sufficient to help them respond to a new outbreak in the areas previously affected areas. the lessons learned from that operation are as follows:

  • strong involvement of local authorities and religious leaders is a key success requirement of the campaign.

  • a cristal clear difference between the urban and rural mobilization strategies is crucial for availability of household and commitment of those households into the participation of the vaccination campaign.

  • daily collection of feedbacks from households pertaining to areas likely to be hostile is necessary; feedback be used to bring them around to adhering the campaign - all these lessons learned will lead us to a successful social mobilization.

in the affected areas, the volunteers of the guinean red cross have already started to refer suspected cases to health centers


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: central african republic

ocha calls for unimpeded access to thousands of displaced people affected by renewed clashes between armed groups in ouaka and haute kotto provinces.

bangui, 22 february 2017 - the acting humanitarian coordinator in the central african republic, aboubacry tall, calls on parties to the conflict in the ouaka and haute kotto provinces to respect and uphold international humanitarian law (ihl). he also urges them to honor their commitment to protect civilians and to fulfill their human rights obligations.

since the beginning of 2017, there have been deadly clashes between rival armed groups in the haute kotto and ouaka provinces to the detriment of civilians who are forcibly displaced. the town of bambari, the capital of ouaka province, currently has 45,000 displaced persons out of a population of 160,000. since the end of november 2016, about 20,000 new idps have been registered. the town of maloum (63km north of bambari), recently received an estimated 4,000 newly displaced persons due to clashes between armed groups in the haute kotto and basse kotto provinces as well as in the ouaka province (ndjoubissi, ndassima, ippy , belengo, mbroutchou and atongo-bakari).

this renewed violence has led to successive gross violations of ihl and breaches to the protection of civilians and for human rights. the affiliation of armed elements to some communities have caused stigmatization, impacting negatively on their freedom of movement. “it is unacceptable for civilians to pay the price for rivalries between armed groups because of their religious believes or political affiliation,” said the acting humanitarian coordinator. in order to ensure the provision of assistance in compliance with the humanitarian principles of neutrality and impartiality, aboubacry tall recalled parties to the conflict of their obligation to “ensure unimpeded humanitarian access with no conditions”. “i strongly urge armed groups not to obstruct the free movement of civilians or humanitarian actors that humanitarian assistance can be deliver to the people in need,” he added.

the acting humanitarian coordinator recalls and reiterates the terms of his statement dated 25 january 2017 in relation to tension between rival armed groups in the ouaka province and its impact on the protection of civilians.


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: yemen

protection concerns persist for those still residing in areas of active conflict. aid agencies have scaled-up their response efforts to meet the needs of the displaced and those hosting them.

key messages

  • escalation of conflict on yemen’s western coast has resulted in significant civilian casualties and large scale displacement, further aggravating the humanitarian situation.

  • over 44,000 people have recently fled the conflict throughout taizz governorate, including at least 25,000 from al mukha and dhubab districts.

  • protection concerns persist for those still residing in areas of active conflict, including al mukha city and neighbouring villages.

  • humanitarians have scaled-up their response efforts to meet the needs of the displaced and those hosting them.

situation overview

the military operation on the western coast continues to intensify, with frontlines shifting north of al mukha city. the conflict has resulted in at least 25,000 people fleeing the districts of al mukha and dhubab in search of safety. during the same period, over 44,000 people have been displaced throughout taizz governorate.

the displaced are mainly fleeing within taizz governorate or to the governorates of al hudaydah,
lahj, ibb, aden and al dhale’e. most of al mukha’s population has now fled the town, with reports indicating that there are only between 80 and 300 families remaining. the remaining are unable to flee due to the costs of transportation, with displaced families indicating that they had to pay as much as us$200 for transportation to other villages within the district.
significant protection concerns remain in al mukha city as clashes persist and basic services are disrupted.

the main hospital is functioning at minimum capacity and there are reports of scores of dead bodies in the street. as fighting reaches yakhtul, a village further north of al mukha city, reports of civilian casualties and displacement increase.

some displaced families are renting accommodation, although most are staying with friends and relatives, residing in public buildings, including schools, or staying out in the open. they fled with minimal items or supplies and are in urgent need of food and non-food items (nfis), shelter, safe water and health care.
some displaced families have also highlighted the trauma they face as a result of the conflict, including the loss of loved ones and the destruction of their homes.

humanitarian response

in response, humanitarian clusters have scaled up their operations across six governorates.

shelter/nfi/camp coordination camp management (cccm) cluster: iom, unhcr and acted have distributed nfis and emergency shelter assistance to 1,544 displaced households (hhs) in al dhale'e (al azariq and al hussein districts), lahj (al madaribah wa al arah district) and al hudaydah (al garrahi and al khawkhah districts) governorates. additionally, cluster partners are assessing the situation in the 28 districts hosting displaced families in taizz, al hudaydah and aden governorates, with the aim of assisting close to 6,000 households.

water and sanitation cluster: wash partners, including unicef, nrc, nm, sci, ir, tyf, oxfam, acf and sci, have provided assistance to some 1,179 hhs in al hudaydah, taizz and lahj governorates. the interventions include distribution of hygiene kits, water filters, water purification tablets, water storage tanks and nfis. additionally, unicef has provided fuel to local water authorities for water pumping to al mukha city, and carried out rehabilitation work in al khawkhah district of al hudayadah governorate in collaboration with the general authority for rural water supply and sanitation. cluster partners are planning to reach an additional 10,477 households with emergency wash interventions in the districts hosting displaced families.

food security and agriculture cluster (fsac): a total of 3,540 displaced households were covered through general food distribution in taizz (al mukha and as silw districts) and in al hudaydah (al garrahi, al khawkhah, at tuhayat, hays, jabal ras, zabid, bayt alfaqiah and almaraweah districts) governorates.

health cluster: who is supporting health facilities in taizz governorate (al mukha and maqbanah districts) and in al hudaydah governorate (al garrahi, hays, and bayt alfaqiah districts), which includes the provision of trauma bags, emergency health kits and the distribution of anti-malarial drugs and rapid test kits.
additionally, iom deployed mobile health teams in al madaribah wa al arah district in lahj governorate and who/yfca are supplying medicines for yfca mobile teams in al mukha city. acf is planning to deploy mobile health teams in al garrahi and jabal ras districts of al hudaydah governorates, and sci is extending operations at the diarrhea treatment centre in bayt alfaqiah district to support idps and the host community. health partners are also focusing on trauma care in conflict affected areas and general health interventions to idps (e.g. acute watery diarrhea, malaria and respiratory infections). response efforts, including the provision of medical supplies and the deployment of mobile teams, are being scaled up in the southern districts of al hudaydah including hays, jabal ras and al khawkha.

protection cluster: cluster partners provided assistance to 415 households in aden and lahj governorates including legal and psychosocial support and cash assistance.
in addition to clusters partners, humanitarian organizations from gulf countries have responded in al mukha and dhubab districts with food and nfi distributions, fuel provision for water schemes and medicines for health facilities.

for further information, please contact:
george khoury, head of office, [email protected]
andrew j. alspach, deputy head of office, amman hub, [email protected]
bruce koepe, ocha new york, coordination and response division, [email protected], tel: +1 917 367 6288
ocha humanitarian bulletins are available at www.unocha.org/yemen | www.unocha.org | www.reliefweb.int


Information

source: un high commissioner for refugees
country: ethiopia, somalia

new displacements of at least 47,000 individuals have been reported due to the ongoing drought in the period 1-23 february 2017, from rural areas to urban and peri-urban locations.

increased displacements caused by drought in south & central somalia

based on ongoing reports from unhcr prmn’s partners in the field, new displacements of at least 47,000 individuals have been reported due to the ongoing drought in the period 1-23 february 2017. these movements are predominantly from rural areas to urban and peri-urban locations.

1. mogadishu arrivals 1-16 february 2017

about 1,780 households (approximately 10,700 individuals) displaced by drought were recorded as arriving in mogadishu from lower shabelle (dacaaraha) and bay (cadaad-gari, idale, xawaal-bar barbaar, and safar-noleys). they have joined 30 idp settlements including war-abdi and qanasax-dheere in kaxda district and waaga-baryay2 and caanool in deynille distict. the priority needs of the new arrivals include food, water and shelter.

2. mogadishu arrivals 17-23 february 2017 update

a further 872 households (5,460 individuals) displaced by drought from gaduudo-duntay, rooday-gaduudo, masuubiye, moora-gaab, ufurow in bay region and buulo-warbo, banbaas, tayaglow, and qod-qado in lower shabelle have reached mogadishu in the week ending 23 february. another group has also arrived from ceel-looble, ceel-dhanawle and ceel-ure in bakool region. field monitors recorded the arrivals in kaxda and deynille districts, in banadir (mogadishu) district. please find a breakdown at the end of this report (table 1) of the settlements the new arrivals have joined.

3. gedo arrivals and movements to ethiopia

in the same period, as a result of the effects of shortage of water, crop failure and loss of livestock, almost 7,000 individuals from bay, bakool and gedo have been recorded reaching many parts of gedo region. 4,120 arrived in dollow while some were also monitored crossing the border to ethiopia. more than 500 arrived at shilin village near dollow from tosiley, gobadiya, goofo and caracase villages; while 162 individuals reached luuq. more than 1,100 individuals reached bardhere from eesow and juungal villages, and 300 individuals arrived in beledhawa.

4. kismayo, lower juba

about 600 individuals (99 households) were reported arriving to kismayo from neighbouring abdalla birolle, bula haji, abdi dhore, yaaqraar, yaaq bishar, shabelley, turqato, kaadweyn and abaaq banbale.


Information

source: un high commissioner for refugees
country: iraq

returns to east mosul are nevertheless happening at a slower pace, some 62,000 idps reportedly returned to their areas of origin, leaving close to 162,000 persons still displaced.

key figures

161,730 persons currently internally displaced from mosul and surrounding areas since military operations to retake the city resumed on 17 october 2016 (1)

21,285 unhcr kits of core relief items (cris) distributed to families in camps, assisting some 126,000 internally displaced persons (idps) from mosul and surrounding areas

5,481 family plots are currently occupied out of 12,497 family plots (for some 66,000 people) in unhcr built camps that are ready to receive idps displaced from mosul corridor.

3 million idps since january 2014 (2)

246,649 iraqi refugees hosted by neighbouring countries in the region, and

12,869 iraqis received in al hol camp in syria since 17 october 2016iom-dtm emergency tracking since 17

(1) iom-dtm emergency tracking since 17 october 2016.

(2) iom-dtm as of 5 january 2017.

population movements

mosul: an estimated 224,000 persons have been displaced from mosul and surrounding areas since the official start of the military operation aimed at retaking the city, on 17 october 2016. some 62,000 idps have reportedly returned to their areas of origin, leaving close to 162,000 persons still displaced at 23 february 2017. as the mosul operations enters the western part of the city, more displacements are expected. returns to east mosul are nevertheless happening at a slower pace. in camps east of mosul, an increasing number of families who had been cleared to return have decided to postpone their departures. unhcr continues to observe families who had left, returning to camps within a few days. families interviewed by unhcr report that they do not intend to return to their places of origin before mosul is fully back under government control. they mention insecurity, lack of jobs, and lack of access to affordable food, kerosene, or basic services such as potable water, medicine, and electricity as reasons which triggered their decision to remain in camps.

situation update

military operations to retake west mosul city continue, in parallel with operations in tel afar, west of mosul. iraqi prime minister abadi announced on 23 february that iraqi security forces (isf) have retaken mosul airport, south of mosul, and have entered the ghazlani military base, an important military complex west of the airport. in the past few days, military forces in tel afar have encircled the city which is still under armed group control, effectively cutting it off from mosul.

high level visits from us defence secretary and russia’s special envoy to iraq. us secretary of defence mattis confirms the full support of the u.s. to iraq during an official visit to iraq, where he met with the prime minister abadi and the minister of defence hayali, on 20 february. the same day, russia special envoy for the middle east and africa, mikhail bogdanov, visited baghdad, where he met with a number of officials, including the prime minister to discuss bilateral cooperation between the two countries. in a press statement published the same day, the special envoy reaffirmed russia’s continued support to iraq in its effort to eradicate terrorism.

unhcr response update

unhcr to start construction of new camp 15 km south of mosul. having received approval for hammam al- alil ii camp from local authorities, unhcr will begin site planning and construction for the camp, which will have the capacity to shelter up to 5,000 families (some 30,000 idps) from west mosul. the site, which is within the agricultural college, is close to a new camp built by the government for a population of up to 4,000 displaced families (24,000 idps).

anticipating displacement from west mosul and tel afar, unhcr has started conducting monitoring missions to amalla area, about 80 km northwest of mosul. efforts are underway to ensure that there is an adequate response capacity in the area to provide protection and assistance in the event of an outflow of idps as a result of the ongoing military operation for the liberation of west mosul and tel afar. amalla camp, built by unhcr, is ready to receive about 3,000 families (18,000 idps). unhcr has prepositioned essential core relief items onsite to respond to the immediate needs of 500 families. partners are mobilized and three unhcr mobile protection monitoring teams are on standby in the area, ready to be deployed.


Information

source: un children's fund
country: kenya, somalia, south sudan

as a result of the drought, a total of 174,000 children are not attending school in the affected counties, and 1,274 schools have no access to water, affecting 246,000 children.

highlights

  • about 2.7 million people in kenya are now in need of relief assistance, up from 1.3 million in august 2016. the president of kenya declared a national disaster on 10 february 2017 and has called for international support.

  • the results of smart surveys conducted in january and february 2017 to monitor the emergency nutrition situation show very high levels of global acute malnutrition (gam) (above 30 per cent) in three northern counties (turkana north, north hor of marsabit, and mandera).

  • as a result of the drought, a total of 174,000 children are not attending school in the affected counties, and 1,274 schools and early childhood development (ecd) centers have no access to water, affecting 246,000 children. an increase in the number of children living in the streets in arid and semi-arid counties has been observed.

  • in light of the pre-famine alert, unicef kenya is revising its humanitarian action for children (hac) appeal funding requirements to reflect the new needs for the drought response.

situation in numbers

2.7 million people are food insecure
(long rains assessment, january 2017)

2.6 million people are in need of wash assistance
(ministry of water and irrigation, february 2017)

1.1 million children are food insecure
(long (rains assessment, january 2017)

109,464 children under 5 in need of sam treatment

174,000 children in pre-primary and primary school are not attending school due to the drought

unicef hac appeal 2017

us$ 23,019,000

situation overview & humanitarian needs

  • below average performance of the 2016 short and long rains has led to a severe drought in the arid and semi-arid lands (asal) of kenya. as a consequence the food insecure population in kenya has more than doubled over a sixmonth period, and it is estimated that 2.7 million people in kenya are now in need of relief assistance, up from 1.3 million in august 20161 . this includes 300,000 people in non-arid and semi-arid (non-asal) counties affected by crop failures and decline of yields. most of those affected are children under-5 years, mothers, the elderly and the sick. the worst-affected counties are turkana, marsabit, samburu, tana river, isiolo, mandera, garissa, wajir and baringo. several county assemblies have voted re-alignment of development budget to drought emergency response. the government of kenya has signed a cabinet memo in november 2016 to allocate ksh 210 million for the drought response, but these funds have still to be put to full use. on 10 february 2017, the president of kenya has declared the ongoing drought a national disaster and has appealed for international support.

  • according to the integrated phase classification (ipc) for acute malnutrition conducted in february 2017, turkana north, north horr in marsabit and mandera counties reported a very critical nutrition situation (phase 5; global acute malnutrition ≥30 per cent). a critical nutrition situation (phase 4; global acute malnutrition 15.0 - 29.9 per cent) was reported in east pokot in baringo county, isiolo and turkana south, west and central. tana river county reported a serious nutrition situation (global acute malnutrition 10.0 -14.9 per cent) while tharaka nithi was in phase 2 (alert global acute malnutrition ≥ 5 to 9.9 per cent). finally kitui and kilifi were in phase 1 (acceptable global acute malnutrition <5 per cent). compared with august 2016, improvement in the nutrition situation was noted in turkana south while deterioration was noted in turkana north, isiolo mandera and marsabit counties. the nutrition situation is expected to deteriorate across all asal counties in the coming months if the dry spell persists.

  • due to the drought, access to water and sanitation continues to deteriorate in affected areas and approximately 2.6 million people are in need of water. approximately 35 per cent of rural water points were non-functional even before the drought; now it is estimated that an additional 20 per cent of water points have broken down or dried up in some areas. the cost of water has risen up to ten-fold in some counties as water points are breaking down due to extra demands or lack of water. distance to viable water sources increased up to 10-15km. per capita water consumption dropped to 5-10 litres per person per day, significantly below the minimum standard of at least 15 litres per person per day. out of the six most drought affected counties with a total of 436 health facilities, over 170 (39 per cent) facilities require water trucking.

  • the drought is also likely to negatively impact health systems, with consequent deterioration in quality and access to life-saving interventions. counties continue to record thousands of diarrheal cases associated with lack of clean water and poor hygiene, especially among children. this is exacerbated by a large number of health facilities without access to clean running water and dependence on water trucking. excessive drought related movement of pastoralist populations is also likely to reduce vaccination coverage of children and access to essential health services, including maternal and new-born care. furthermore, health services continue to be negatively impacted by the health workers strike, with the doctor’s strike entering its third month. this has, and is likely to continue, reduce the availability and quality of health provision, leading to unnecessary increases in preventable deaths.

  • the drought is affecting kenya at a moment when the cholera epidemic is still active. since december 2014, 30 out of 47 counties have been affected by cholera, of which tana river is the only county that continues to report cases. total cases reported from 10 october 2016 are 215 (164 cases in 2016 and 51 cases in 2017) with 5 deaths (case fatality rate of 2.3%). risk factors such as low latrine coverage, deep rooted social practices, poverty and high illiteracy are still prevalent in the county, and therefore, the outbreak is expected to escalate due to the ongoing drought. increased surveillance, health promotion activities and health education about cholera are re-activated in dadaab refugee camps due to the cholera outbreak in somalia.

  • ministry of health surveillance reports of 15 and 22 january show more counties reporting suspected measles outbreaks, with 36 cases reported in the week ending 15 january 2017. since the last measles rubella campaign was completed nearly one year ago and routine vaccination rates in drought affected areas are low, these cases are expected to rise, as more unvaccinated newborns enter the population.

  • data collected by unicef in january 2017 from 10 affected counties indicates that over 174,000 children (14.2 per cent of school aged population) are not attending ecd and primary schools due to drought impact, mainly lack of food and water. four schools have closed as a direct result of drought in two counties and 1,274 schools have no access to water in the same 10 counties, affecting 246,000 children. schools in both dadaab and host communities are currently experiencing lack of water and food, creating an alarming situation which may undermine the efforts to increase enrolment in most of schools. more than 50 per cent of refugees in kakuma and dadaab are under 18 years, many of whom have experienced violent conflict and displacement, and 48 per cent of whom are out of school.

  • results from the national primary examinations in both kakuma and dadaab continue to improve, with 90 per cent and 67 per cent pass rates, respectively in 2016. however, due to lack of learning facilities, only 13 per cent of the learners may be enrolled in secondary school. in addition, only 25 per cent of secondary school students are girls.

  • increases in numbers of children on the streets in urban centers as well as cases of child abuse have been reported. in lodwar town, approximately 500 children (a third of them girls) are on the streets at night due to effects of drought (compared to about 60 in march 2016).

  • as of 31 january 2017, kenya hosts 496,420 refugees (159,053 in kakuma, 270,100 in dadaab, and 67,267 in nairobi). refugee influx from south sudan into kakuma refugee camp and kalobeyei continues, with 1,557 new arrivals in 2017, of which 107 are unaccompanied minors (61 boys and 46 girls) and 547 are separated children (362 boys and 185 girls). due to the worsening drought situation in south sudan and somalia, there is the likelihood of increased arrivals of drought-displaced persons in both kakuma and dadaab refugee camps, with an increased number of children suffering from malnutrition.

  • the high court of kenya has ruled against the government decision to close the dadaab refugee camps, and has ordered the re-instatement of the department of refugee affairs. further direction on the way forward is awaited from the government. in this regard, the planned closure by 31 may 2017 still stands.


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: yemen

protection concerns persist for those still residing in areas of active conflict. aid agencies have scaled-up their response efforts to meet the needs of the displaced and those hosting them.

key messages

  • escalation of conflict on yemen’s western coast has resulted in significant civilian casualties and large scale displacement, further aggravating the humanitarian situation.

  • over 44,000 people have recently fled the conflict throughout taizz governorate, including at least 25,000 from al mukha and dhubab districts.

  • protection concerns persist for those still residing in areas of active conflict, including al mukha city and neighbouring villages.

  • humanitarians have scaled-up their response efforts to meet the needs of the displaced and those hosting them.

situation overview

the military operation on the western coast continues to intensify, with frontlines shifting north of al mukha city. the conflict has resulted in at least 25,000 people fleeing the districts of al mukha and dhubab in search of safety. during the same period, over 44,000 people have been displaced throughout taizz governorate.

the displaced are mainly fleeing within taizz governorate or to the governorates of al hudaydah,
lahj, ibb, aden and al dhale’e. most of al mukha’s population has now fled the town, with reports indicating that there are only between 80 and 300 families remaining. the remaining are unable to flee due to the costs of transportation, with displaced families indicating that they had to pay as much as us$200 for transportation to other villages within the district.
significant protection concerns remain in al mukha city as clashes persist and basic services are disrupted.

the main hospital is functioning at minimum capacity and there are reports of scores of dead bodies in the street. as fighting reaches yakhtul, a village further north of al mukha city, reports of civilian casualties and displacement increase.

some displaced families are renting accommodation, although most are staying with friends and relatives, residing in public buildings, including schools, or staying out in the open. they fled with minimal items or supplies and are in urgent need of food and non-food items (nfis), shelter, safe water and health care.
some displaced families have also highlighted the trauma they face as a result of the conflict, including the loss of loved ones and the destruction of their homes.

humanitarian response

in response, humanitarian clusters have scaled up their operations across six governorates.

shelter/nfi/camp coordination camp management (cccm) cluster: iom, unhcr and acted have distributed nfis and emergency shelter assistance to 1,544 displaced households (hhs) in al dhale'e (al azariq and al hussein districts), lahj (al madaribah wa al arah district) and al hudaydah (al garrahi and al khawkhah districts) governorates. additionally, cluster partners are assessing the situation in the 28 districts hosting displaced families in taizz, al hudaydah and aden governorates, with the aim of assisting close to 6,000 households.

water and sanitation cluster: wash partners, including unicef, nrc, nm, sci, ir, tyf, oxfam, acf and sci, have provided assistance to some 1,179 hhs in al hudaydah, taizz and lahj governorates. the interventions include distribution of hygiene kits, water filters, water purification tablets, water storage tanks and nfis. additionally, unicef has provided fuel to local water authorities for water pumping to al mukha city, and carried out rehabilitation work in al khawkhah district of al hudayadah governorate in collaboration with the general authority for rural water supply and sanitation. cluster partners are planning to reach an additional 10,477 households with emergency wash interventions in the districts hosting displaced families.

food security and agriculture cluster (fsac): a total of 3,540 displaced households were covered through general food distribution in taizz (al mukha and as silw districts) and in al hudaydah (al garrahi, al khawkhah, at tuhayat, hays, jabal ras, zabid, bayt alfaqiah and almaraweah districts) governorates.

health cluster: who is supporting health facilities in taizz governorate (al mukha and maqbanah districts) and in al hudaydah governorate (al garrahi, hays, and bayt alfaqiah districts), which includes the provision of trauma bags, emergency health kits and the distribution of anti-malarial drugs and rapid test kits.
additionally, iom deployed mobile health teams in al madaribah wa al arah district in lahj governorate and who/yfca are supplying medicines for yfca mobile teams in al mukha city. acf is planning to deploy mobile health teams in al garrahi and jabal ras districts of al hudaydah governorates, and sci is extending operations at the diarrhea treatment centre in bayt alfaqiah district to support idps and the host community. health partners are also focusing on trauma care in conflict affected areas and general health interventions to idps (e.g. acute watery diarrhea, malaria and respiratory infections). response efforts, including the provision of medical supplies and the deployment of mobile teams, are being scaled up in the southern districts of al hudaydah including hays, jabal ras and al khawkha.

protection cluster: cluster partners provided assistance to 415 households in aden and lahj governorates including legal and psychosocial support and cash assistance.
in addition to clusters partners, humanitarian organizations from gulf countries have responded in al mukha and dhubab districts with food and nfi distributions, fuel provision for water schemes and medicines for health facilities.

for further information, please contact:
george khoury, head of office, [email protected]
andrew j. alspach, deputy head of office, amman hub, [email protected]
bruce koepe, ocha new york, coordination and response division, [email protected], tel: +1 917 367 6288
ocha humanitarian bulletins are available at www.unocha.org/yemen | www.unocha.org | www.reliefweb.int


Information

source: un resident coordinator for mongolia
country: mongolia

extreme winter weather continues to endanger herder families, who may counter falling incomes with negative coping mechanisms, such as withdrawing children from schools.

overview

mongolia is currently experiencing harsh winter conditions which are severely impacting herders. the impacts of an unusually dry summer, late autumn rains and early, followed by heavy snowfall in september to november 2016 have combined to create an unfolding humanitarian crisis. the government of mongolia is reporting dzud or near dzud conditions in 127 soums of 17 provinces, and two districts of ulaanbaatar city. it is estimated that 165,282 people (43,579 herder households) are at risk. one quarter are children, pregnant women, people with special needs and elderly people.

the extreme winter weather, following on from a drought during the summer of 2016, has depleted herders’ reserves of hay and fodder. heavy snow and ice cover in the north of the country, means grazing and the movement of animals has become increasingly difficult. with temperatures dropping to below -40 degrees, weakened livestock are at significant risk of ill health and death with humanitarian impacts on herder families.

the most vulnerable to the impacts of the severe winter weather are herder households with less than 200 head of animals, who have limited coping mechanisms. the poor health and death of their livestock places them at risk of decreased incomes, indebtedness, difficulties in purchasing essential items, and negative coping mechanisms such as withdrawing children from education.

a joint un-nema rapid assessment conducted in december 2016 found many herder households in affected areas were unable to meet their basic needs including food, clothing, fuel for heating and cooking fuel, hygiene products, livestock feed and emergency communications.

as well as the impact on vital livestock, the severe winter weather is also cutting people off from accessing essential services such as healthcare and education. according to the ministry of health, 2,479 pregnant women, 26,166 children under five and 12,813 elderly people are wintering in areas with no or limited access to basic services.

key numbers

127 soums of 17 provinces affected

157,000 people affected (37,000 herder households)

12,600 people targeted with cerf funded projects

funding overview (us$)

$6,671,000 total amount required for the response


Information

source: médecins sans frontières
country: eritrea, ethiopia, libya, sudan, world

rather than developing safe and legal routes for people seeking international protection, the eu is increasingly collaborating with eritrea, libya, sudan and ethiopia, according to a new report.

eu prevention policy puts eritreans at risk of imprisonment, torture and death

despite mounting evidence of inhumane treatment faced by eritreans, both within and outside eritrea, the eu is doing all it can to prevent them from reaching its shores, says a new report published today by médecins sans frontières/doctors without borders (msf).

the report is based on hundreds of conversations and 106 in-depth testimonies from eritreans who have fled their country. in msf’s medical projects in libya, ethiopia and on its rescue boats in the mediterranean, eritreans arrive almost every day with wounds, heavy scarring and other medical conditions, including severe psychological illnesses, that are consistent with their testimonies.

every eritrean interviewed by msf teams on its search and rescue vessels in the mediterranean sea reports being either a direct victim or a witness to severe levels of violence, as well as being held in captivity of some kind. more than half report having witnessed the deaths of fellow refugees, asylum seekers or migrants, most often as the result of violence.

every eritrean woman interviewed has either directly experienced or knows someone who has experienced sexual violence, including rape, often inflicted by multiple perpetrators.

it is illegal for eritreans to leave the country without an exit visa, which are notoriously difficult to obtain. those who are able to escape face extended periods in refugee camps in neighbouring sudan and ethiopia; physical, psychological and sexual violence; arbitrary detention and deportations in libya; and dangerous sea crossings to europe – a crossing which claimed the lives of at least 4,500 people in 2016 alone.

rather than developing safe and legal routes for those seeking international protection, the eu is increasingly collaborating with eritrea, libya, sudan and ethiopia to prevent eritreans from leaving eritrea and transiting through these countries to reach europe.

the eu’s attempts to stem migration through strengthening national borders and bolstering detention facilities outside its borders leave people no choice but to pay smugglers to get them past checkpoints, across borders, through fences, out of prisons and ultimately onto boats on the mediterranean sea.

vickie hawkins, msf uk executive director:_ “it is vital that the uk government provides channels to safety for eritreans, and indeed all people fleeing conflict and persecution. efforts to manage migration should not externalise border controls to unsafe countries - wherever they may be._

"given the uk prime minister’s commitment to lead a ‘truly global britain which reaches beyond europe’, the uk must lead by example in ensuring vulnerable people who are in need of asylum are able to seek it safely. msf insists that people seeking protection must not be abandoned or left trapped in unsafe places, with no option but to risk their lives on a perilous journey.

"containment is not the answer; uk policies should never trap or force people into danger. appallingly, current policies do just that”.

ends

notes to editors

according to the guardian, new guidance on eritrea issued by the uk home office in 2015 resulted in the levels of grants of asylum to eritreans plummeting from 85% to 60%. however, 87% of those refused under the new guidance had their refusals overturned by judges on appeal.


Information

source: irin
country: nigeria

for many women, the threat is no longer the jihadists but a backlash from men inside displacement camps. advocates say women are increasingly at risk of exploitation.

maiduguri, 22 february 2017

the camps for displaced people scattered across northeast nigeria are supposed to provide safety from boko haram violence. but for many women the threat is no longer the jihadists: the danger is inside the camps, and stems from the attitudes of men in general.

read more on irin


source: un high commissioner for refugees
country: iraq

returns to east mosul are nevertheless happening at a slower pace, some 62,000 idps reportedly returned to their areas of origin, leaving close to 162,000 persons still displaced.

key figures

161,730 persons currently internally displaced from mosul and surrounding areas since military operations to retake the city resumed on 17 october 2016 (1)

21,285 unhcr kits of core relief items (cris) distributed to families in camps, assisting some 126,000 internally displaced persons (idps) from mosul and surrounding areas

5,481 family plots are currently occupied out of 12,497 family plots (for some 66,000 people) in unhcr built camps that are ready to receive idps displaced from mosul corridor.

3 million idps since january 2014 (2)

246,649 iraqi refugees hosted by neighbouring countries in the region, and

12,869 iraqis received in al hol camp in syria since 17 october 2016iom-dtm emergency tracking since 17

(1) iom-dtm emergency tracking since 17 october 2016.

(2) iom-dtm as of 5 january 2017.

population movements

mosul: an estimated 224,000 persons have been displaced from mosul and surrounding areas since the official start of the military operation aimed at retaking the city, on 17 october 2016. some 62,000 idps have reportedly returned to their areas of origin, leaving close to 162,000 persons still displaced at 23 february 2017. as the mosul operations enters the western part of the city, more displacements are expected. returns to east mosul are nevertheless happening at a slower pace. in camps east of mosul, an increasing number of families who had been cleared to return have decided to postpone their departures. unhcr continues to observe families who had left, returning to camps within a few days. families interviewed by unhcr report that they do not intend to return to their places of origin before mosul is fully back under government control. they mention insecurity, lack of jobs, and lack of access to affordable food, kerosene, or basic services such as potable water, medicine, and electricity as reasons which triggered their decision to remain in camps.

situation update

military operations to retake west mosul city continue, in parallel with operations in tel afar, west of mosul. iraqi prime minister abadi announced on 23 february that iraqi security forces (isf) have retaken mosul airport, south of mosul, and have entered the ghazlani military base, an important military complex west of the airport. in the past few days, military forces in tel afar have encircled the city which is still under armed group control, effectively cutting it off from mosul.

high level visits from us defence secretary and russia’s special envoy to iraq. us secretary of defence mattis confirms the full support of the u.s. to iraq during an official visit to iraq, where he met with the prime minister abadi and the minister of defence hayali, on 20 february. the same day, russia special envoy for the middle east and africa, mikhail bogdanov, visited baghdad, where he met with a number of officials, including the prime minister to discuss bilateral cooperation between the two countries. in a press statement published the same day, the special envoy reaffirmed russia’s continued support to iraq in its effort to eradicate terrorism.

unhcr response update

unhcr to start construction of new camp 15 km south of mosul. having received approval for hammam al- alil ii camp from local authorities, unhcr will begin site planning and construction for the camp, which will have the capacity to shelter up to 5,000 families (some 30,000 idps) from west mosul. the site, which is within the agricultural college, is close to a new camp built by the government for a population of up to 4,000 displaced families (24,000 idps).

anticipating displacement from west mosul and tel afar, unhcr has started conducting monitoring missions to amalla area, about 80 km northwest of mosul. efforts are underway to ensure that there is an adequate response capacity in the area to provide protection and assistance in the event of an outflow of idps as a result of the ongoing military operation for the liberation of west mosul and tel afar. amalla camp, built by unhcr, is ready to receive about 3,000 families (18,000 idps). unhcr has prepositioned essential core relief items onsite to respond to the immediate needs of 500 families. partners are mobilized and three unhcr mobile protection monitoring teams are on standby in the area, ready to be deployed.


Information

source: norwegian refugee council
country: afghanistan

two students were killed in laghman province, and seven others and a teacher injured, when a mortar round struck their school on saturday 25 february.

“two students were tragically and needlessly killed in laghman province, and seven others and a teacher injured, when a mortar round struck their school. we cannot let children and schools continue to become victims of this escalating conflict,” said nrc country director in afghanistan, kate o'rourke. “education is increasingly becoming a casualty of the conflict.”

around 10am saturday 25 feb, a mortar round struck a state-run classroom in the shaheed mawlawi habib rahman high school in the besram area of alingar district, in the eastern province of laghman.

“everyone was in class when we heard the sound of a mortar being fired nearby,” said abdul latif kochai, the school principal. “our students and nearby villagers frantically transported those injured to the hospital. the medical staff tried their best to treat them. two of our male students died—one in grade 7, the other in grade 11.”

the day before, armed clashes between armed opposition groups and afghan security forces had intensified near besram, located near the border between alingar and mehterlam districts.

neither side has accepted responsibility. however, around two hundred villagers protested later that day outside the laghman provincial governor’s compound in mehterlam.

“this is tragedy for the families of these children and their communities. the aspirations of these students and teachers to contribute to a better future in their country have been destroyed in this senseless incident,” said o’rourke. "the rise in attacks on education in afghanistan undermines the progress made in the last decade. afghan parents must increasingly choose between their children’s education and their safety."

international humanitarian law proscribes attacks on educational institutions by military forces.

“the afghan government is commended for being one of the first signatories to the oslo safe schools declaration. it must investigate all attacks on schools and hold those found responsible accountable,” said will carter, head of programme, nrc afghanistan.

“the government should not dismiss any information before it has conducted a thorough investigation. there is no evidence to suggest that the school was occupied by the taliban, or had in some way become a legitimate military target. instead, students were studying.”

facts

the government of afghanistan endorsed the oslo safe schools declaration in a meeting hosted by the norwegian ministry of foreign affairs on 29 may 2015, along with 36 other states. to date, 59 states are signatories to the declaration.

the number of people displaced due to conflict has increased in afghanistan over the past five years. more than 600,000 persons were internally displaced due to conflict in 2016 alone. on top of this, more than 600,000 afghans returned from pakistan between july and december 2016, with the majority settling in eastern afghanistan.

in 2016, nrc supported the education of approximately 80,000 afghan boys and girls affected by conflict and emergency in afghanistan, including 10,000 in the eastern region. this work is primarily funded by the eu (echo), norway and sweden (sida).

in total, over 2016, nrc directly assisted 300,000 displaced persons through its wider programming in afghanistan, which includes legal assistance, shelter, and education in emergencies. nrc maintains ten offices across the country, including in nangarhar, which also responds to humanitarian needs in laghman province.

a second safe schools declaration meeting is scheduled for 28-29th march 2017 in argentina, aiming for increased commitment to the oslo safe schools declaration.


Information

source: médecins sans frontières
country: eritrea, ethiopia, libya, sudan, world

rather than developing safe and legal routes for people seeking international protection, the eu is increasingly collaborating with eritrea, libya, sudan and ethiopia, according to a new report.

eu prevention policy puts eritreans at risk of imprisonment, torture and death

despite mounting evidence of inhumane treatment faced by eritreans, both within and outside eritrea, the eu is doing all it can to prevent them from reaching its shores, says a new report published today by médecins sans frontières/doctors without borders (msf).

the report is based on hundreds of conversations and 106 in-depth testimonies from eritreans who have fled their country. in msf’s medical projects in libya, ethiopia and on its rescue boats in the mediterranean, eritreans arrive almost every day with wounds, heavy scarring and other medical conditions, including severe psychological illnesses, that are consistent with their testimonies.

every eritrean interviewed by msf teams on its search and rescue vessels in the mediterranean sea reports being either a direct victim or a witness to severe levels of violence, as well as being held in captivity of some kind. more than half report having witnessed the deaths of fellow refugees, asylum seekers or migrants, most often as the result of violence.

every eritrean woman interviewed has either directly experienced or knows someone who has experienced sexual violence, including rape, often inflicted by multiple perpetrators.

it is illegal for eritreans to leave the country without an exit visa, which are notoriously difficult to obtain. those who are able to escape face extended periods in refugee camps in neighbouring sudan and ethiopia; physical, psychological and sexual violence; arbitrary detention and deportations in libya; and dangerous sea crossings to europe – a crossing which claimed the lives of at least 4,500 people in 2016 alone.

rather than developing safe and legal routes for those seeking international protection, the eu is increasingly collaborating with eritrea, libya, sudan and ethiopia to prevent eritreans from leaving eritrea and transiting through these countries to reach europe.

the eu’s attempts to stem migration through strengthening national borders and bolstering detention facilities outside its borders leave people no choice but to pay smugglers to get them past checkpoints, across borders, through fences, out of prisons and ultimately onto boats on the mediterranean sea.

vickie hawkins, msf uk executive director:_ “it is vital that the uk government provides channels to safety for eritreans, and indeed all people fleeing conflict and persecution. efforts to manage migration should not externalise border controls to unsafe countries - wherever they may be._

"given the uk prime minister’s commitment to lead a ‘truly global britain which reaches beyond europe’, the uk must lead by example in ensuring vulnerable people who are in need of asylum are able to seek it safely. msf insists that people seeking protection must not be abandoned or left trapped in unsafe places, with no option but to risk their lives on a perilous journey.

"containment is not the answer; uk policies should never trap or force people into danger. appallingly, current policies do just that”.

ends

notes to editors

according to the guardian, new guidance on eritrea issued by the uk home office in 2015 resulted in the levels of grants of asylum to eritreans plummeting from 85% to 60%. however, 87% of those refused under the new guidance had their refusals overturned by judges on appeal.


Information

source: world health organization
country: somalia

drought conditions have increased the spread of epidemic-prone diseases such as acute watery diarrhoea, cholera and measles. in the first 7 weeks of 2017, over 6,000 cases and 65 deaths by awd/cholera have been reported.

cairo, 27 february 2017 – the world health organization (who) is scaling up its response in somalia to provide critical health services for 1.5 million people currently affected by severe drought conditions and a worsening food crisis. however, the organization urgently requires us$ 10 million as part of the united nations appeal for the first 6 months of 2017.

the humanitarian situation in somalia continues to deteriorate, and there is a high risk that the country will face its third famine in 25 years. more than 6.2 million people – half of the total population – are in urgent need of humanitarian aid, including almost 3 million facing a food security crisis. nearly 5.5 million people are at risk of contracting waterborne diseases, more than half of whom are women and children under 5 years of age.

acute drought in many parts of somalia has reduced the availability of clean water sources, and the food crisis has given way to malnutrition. more than 363 000 acutely malnourished children and 70 000 severely malnourished children are in need of urgent and life-saving support. according to united nations estimates, if the current situation food and security continues, these numbers are estimated to double in 2017.

drought conditions have increased the spread of epidemic-prone diseases such as acute watery diarrhoea, cholera and measles. in the first 7 weeks of 2017, over 6000 cases and 65 deaths by acute watery diarrhoea/ cholera have been reported, and a total of 2578 cases of suspected measles were reported as of september 2016.

“somalia is now at a critical point as a result of this drought and environmental hazards and lack of basic services,” said who regional director for the eastern mediterranean dr mahmoud fikri. “less than half of the population in somalia has access to basic health services. who is providing all possible support to address the ongoing challenges and reduce the dire consequences of drought and pre-famine. who regional office rapid response teams have been deployed to reinforce support in the areas of emergency response, disease outbreaks, health systems and nutrition.”

who’s regional office has delivered medicines and medical supplies to health facilities in drought-affected areas. a total of 265 sentinel sites are providing enhanced surveillance for epidemic-prone diseases such as cholera and measles. cholera treatment centres have been established in 40 districts to manage cases of severe acute watery diarrhoea/ cholera.

the united nations has launched an appeal for us$ 825 million for the first half of 2017 for the pre-famine response, of which us$ 85 million is required by the health sector, including us$ 10 million required by who.

for more information:
rana sidani
senior communication officer
direct: +20 2 22765552
mobile: +20 1099756506
e-mail: [email protected]


Information

source: world food programme
country: iraq

via telephone, many families said food was unaffordable, while others said they could not access food at all. due to increased fighting, people are afraid to leave their homes, making it even more difficult to search for essential food.

erbil – the united nations world food programme (wfp) is extremely concerned about the humanitarian situation facing families in western mosul, where more than 750,000 people are living in dire conditions.

while access to reliable information about the conditions inside western mosul is limited, wfp’s monitoring team and partners have spoken to a number of families inside the city as they assess access and availability of food. through telephone interviews, many distressed families said that food was unaffordable, while others said they could not access food at all. due to increased fighting, people are afraid to leave their homes, making it even more difficult to search for essential food items.

“the situation is unbelievable,” reported a 46-year-old man from inside the city. “there is no food, no clean water, no gas for heating, no medicine and no services.”

“wfp is monitoring the frontlines and remains ready to provide immediate food assistance as soon as families can be reached safely,” said wfp iraq representative and country director sally haydock. “we are hearing from some families that food has drastically risen in price and is unaffordable. in extreme cases, people cannot access food at all. we appeal to all parties to the conflict to facilitate immediate and unimpeded humanitarian access to all iraqis in need of assistance.”

so far, wfp has provided ready-to-eat food for over 6,000 people who have fled villages to the south of western mosul. most have made their way to hamam al alil, qayyarah jeda’a and haj ali camps. wfp has enough food in stock to cover the immediate needs of 770,000 people who reside in the western mosul area.

a recent wfp survey has found that food in western mosul has become scarce as supply lines have been cut, and that prices of all food items have gone up significantly. as most families have been without income for the past two-and-a-half years, many people are struggling to feed their families.

thanks to contributions from canada, the european commission, germany, japan, the kingdom of saudi arabia, and the united states, wfp has provided ready-to-eat food for over one million people since the start of the mosul offensive in october 2016. this support has been provided to all families displaced in camps and those remaining in eastern mosul, as well as those in retaken areas within the mosul corridor.

 ### 

wfp is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. each year, wfp assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

follow us on twitter @wfp_mena

for more information please contact (email address: [email protected]):
ingermarie vennize, wfp/iraq, tel. +964 780 9150937
alexandra murdoch, wfp / iraq, tel. 964 780 915 6119
abeer etefa, wfp/cairo, tel. +2010 66634352
dina el-kassaby, wfp/cairo, tel. +2010 15218882
jane howard, wfp/rome, tel. +39 06 65132321, mob. +39 346 7600521
bettina luescher, wfp/geneva, tel. +41 22 917 8564, mob. +41 79 842 8057
steve taravella, wfp/washington dc, tel. +1 202 6531149, mob. +1 202 7705993


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: bangladesh, indonesia, myanmar, nauru, philippines, solomon islands, vanuatu

following an outbreak of dengue in the solomon islands, 10,095 suspected cases have been reported. recent heavy rains may exacerbate the situation.

myanmar

a cerf allocation of almost us$4.4 million has been approved to support the humanitarian response following the 9 october attacks and subsequent security operations in the northern part of rakhine. wfp has begun a second round of emergency food distributions in maungdaw north. as of 27 february, 23,700 people, most of whom are displaced, have been reached with food, while 22,700 have received nutrition support in this round. 279 displaced families were allowed to return to their villages in northern rakhine last week. distribution of assistance from malaysia has begun in maungdaw. access and movement restrictions continue to undermine the quality of the life-saving services humanitarian organizations can provide.1

23,700 people reached with food assistance

bangladesh

a seasonal increase of acute watery diarrhoea (awd) has been reported in cox’s bazar among rohingya communities who have crossed from rakhine state, myanmar. there is no evidence of a cholera outbreak, although this remains a concern. health awareness activities are being strengthened in response. partners have also observed a measles outbreak among children in cox’s bazar. vaccination campaigns are taking place in camps and surrounding villages. on 23 february, un special rapporteur yanghee lee completed her mission to bangladesh where she spoke to new arrivals and afterwards expressed particular concern about sgbv and child trauma.

philippines

as of 25 february, more than 30,000 people remain displaced by flooding in northeastern mindanao, with most staying with relatives or friends. surigao del norte, which was also affected by the 10 february earthquake, still has 1,150 people displaced by flooding that are staying in evacuation centres. local disaster management authorities continue to monitor the situation and provide assistance to those displaced.3

30,000 people remain displaced

indonesia

between 23 and 26 february, floods were reported in aceh, and various locations in java. an estimated 2,300 people are temporarily displaced following damage to their homes. local governments are responding to the situation and have provided basic relief items. high levels of precipitation are predicted in papua, maluku and sulawesi throughout march.4

2,300 people temporarily displaced

solomon islands, vanuatu, nauru

following an outbreak of dengue in the solomon islands, 10,095 suspected cases have been reported across all 10 provinces of the country. recent heavy rains may have exacerbated the situation as previous trends show a spike in reported cases following the wet season. vanuatu has also experienced an increasing number of dengue cases, with over 1,700 reported. the majority of suspected cases are in port vila, however cases have also been reported in luganville, lenakel and norsup. in nauru, dengue has reportedly affected approximately 88 people, with one death reported.


Information

source: deutsche welle
country: chile

landslides around the capital, santiago have contaminated a major river and cut off the drinking water supply to around 4 million people. at least three people have died and dozens are missing.

landslides around the chilean capital of santiago have contaminated a major river and cut off the drinking water supply to around 4 million people. officials have said that at least three people have died in the floods.

at least three people were killed in the rainstorms and several others were missing, authorities said on sunday.

"we are talking about 1.45 million homes that are going to be affected by the cutting off of the water supply, which will be total or partial in 30 districts" of santiago, claudio orrego, the region's governor, told reporters. more than 60 percent of the capital's 6.5 million inhabitants are likely to be affected.

aguas andinas, the company that provides santiago's water supply, said the ongoing downpours were making repairs difficult.

"we still do not know when the drinking water will be turned back on," orrego said. "we cannot guarantee resumption of the service until the river maipo clears up."

another 373 people in a mountain valley near the capital were isolated after the nearby river banks overflowed.

chile's president, michelle bachelet, wrote on twitter: "emergency teams are working on the ground to connect with isolated persons and re-establish the water supply wherever possible."

bodies recovered

chile's national emergency services reported that a 12-year-old girl was killed in the o'higgins region after a landslide swept away the car she was in. santiago officials also said they had recovered two bodies from a river just outside of the capital.

the death toll could quickly rise, however, with as many as 19 people still reported missing according to reuters news agency.

a summer of havoc

these were the second major floods to hit central chile in the past year. in april, one person was killed after heavy rainstorms battered the san jose de maipo valley.

subsequent flooding also forced some of the world's largest copper mines, located in the region, to shut down production.

chile had just this week declared an end to a state of emergency after a series forest fires devastated large parts of the country.


Information

source: un children's fund
country: kenya, somalia, south sudan

as a result of the drought, a total of 174,000 children are not attending school in the affected counties, and 1,274 schools have no access to water, affecting 246,000 children.

highlights

  • about 2.7 million people in kenya are now in need of relief assistance, up from 1.3 million in august 20161 . the president of kenya declared a national disaster on 10 february 2017 and has called for international support.

  • the results of smart surveys conducted in january and february 2017 to monitor the emergency nutrition situation show very high levels of global acute malnutrition (gam) (above 30 per cent) in three northern counties (turkana north, north hor of marsabit, and mandera)

  • as a result of the drought, a total of 174,000 children are not attending school in the affected counties, and 1,274 schools and early childhood development (ecd) centers have no access to water, affecting 246,000 children. an increase in the number of children living in the streets in arid and semi-arid counties has been observed.

  • unicef kenya is revising its humanitarian action for children (hac) appeal funding requirements to reflect the new needs for the drought response.

situation in numbers

2.7 million people are food insecure (long rains assessment, january 2017)

2.6 million people are in need of wash assistance (ministry of water and irrigation, february 2017)

1.1 million children are food insecure (long (rains assessment, january 2017)

109,464 children under 5 in need of sam treatment

174,000 children in pre-primary and primary school are not attending school due to the drought

unicef hac appeal 2017

us$ 23,019,000

situation overview & humanitarian needs

  • below average performance of the 2016 short and long rains has led to a severe drought in the arid and semi-arid lands (asal) of kenya. as a consequence the food insecure population in kenya has more than doubled over a sixmonth period, and it is estimated that 2.7 million people in kenya are now in need of relief assistance, up from 1.3 million in august 20161 . this includes 300,000 people in non-arid and semi-arid (non-asal) counties affected by crop failures and decline of yields. most of those affected are children under-5 years, mothers, the elderly and the sick. the worst-affected counties are turkana, marsabit, samburu, tana river, isiolo, mandera, garissa, wajir and baringo. several county assemblies have voted re-alignment of development budget to drought emergency response. the government of kenya has signed a cabinet memo in november 2016 to allocate ksh 210 million for the drought response, but these funds have still to be put to full use. on 10 february 2017, the president of kenya has declared the ongoing drought a national disaster and has appealed for international support.

  • according to the integrated phase classification (ipc) for acute malnutrition conducted in february 2017, turkana north, north horr in marsabit and mandera counties reported a very critical nutrition situation (phase 5; global acute malnutrition ≥30 per cent). a critical nutrition situation (phase 4; global acute malnutrition 15.0 - 29.9 per cent) was reported in east pokot in baringo county, isiolo and turkana south, west and central. tana river county reported a serious nutrition situation (global acute malnutrition 10.0 -14.9 per cent) while tharaka nithi was in phase 2 (alert global acute malnutrition ≥ 5 to 9.9 per cent). finally kitui and kilifi were in phase 1 (acceptable global acute malnutrition <5 per cent). compared with august 2016, improvement in the nutrition situation was noted in turkana south while deterioration was noted in turkana north, isiolo mandera and marsabit counties. the nutrition situation is expected to deteriorate across all asal counties in the coming months if the dry spell persists.

  • due to the drought, access to water and sanitation continues to deteriorate in affected areas and approximately 2.6 million people are in need of water. approximately 35 per cent of rural water points were non-functional even before the drought; now it is estimated that an additional 20 per cent of water points have broken down or dried up in some areas. the cost of water has risen up to ten-fold in some counties as water points are breaking down due to extra demands or lack of water. distance to viable water sources increased up to 10-15km. per capita water consumption dropped to 5-10 litres per person per day, significantly below the minimum standard of at least 15 litres per person per day. out of the six most drought affected counties with a total of 436 health facilities, over 170 (39 per cent) facilities require water trucking.

  • the drought is also likely to negatively impact health systems, with consequent deterioration in quality and access to life-saving interventions. counties continue to record thousands of diarrheal cases associated with lack of clean water and poor hygiene, especially among children. this is exacerbated by a large number of health facilities without access to clean running water and dependence on water trucking. excessive drought related movement of pastoralist populations is also likely to reduce vaccination coverage of children and access to essential health services, including maternal and new-born care. furthermore, health services continue to be negatively impacted by the health workers strike, with the doctor’s strike entering its third month. this has, and is likely to continue, reduce the availability and quality of health provision, leading to unnecessary increases in preventable deaths.

  • the drought is affecting kenya at a moment when the cholera epidemic is still active. since december 2014, 30 out of 47 counties have been affected by cholera, of which tana river is the only county that continues to report cases. total cases reported from 10 october 2016 are 215 (164 cases in 2016 and 51 cases in 2017) with 5 deaths (case fatality rate of 2.3%). risk factors such as low latrine coverage, deep rooted social practices, poverty and high illiteracy are still prevalent in the county, and therefore, the outbreak is expected to escalate due to the ongoing drought. increased surveillance, health promotion activities and health education about cholera are re-activated in dadaab refugee camps due to the cholera outbreak in somalia.

  • ministry of health surveillance reports of 15 and 22 january show more counties reporting suspected measles outbreaks, with 36 cases reported in the week ending 15 january 2017. since the last measles rubella campaign was completed nearly one year ago and routine vaccination rates in drought affected areas are low, these cases are expected to rise, as more unvaccinated newborns enter the population.

  • data collected by unicef in january 2017 from 10 affected counties indicates that over 174,000 children (14.2 per cent of school aged population) are not attending ecd and primary schools due to drought impact, mainly lack of food and water. four schools have closed as a direct result of drought in two counties and 1,274 schools have no access to water in the same 10 counties, affecting 246,000 children. schools in both dadaab and host communities are currently experiencing lack of water and food, creating an alarming situation which may undermine the efforts to increase enrolment in most of schools. more than 50 per cent of refugees in kakuma and dadaab are under 18 years, many of whom have experienced violent conflict and displacement, and 48 per cent of whom are out of school.

  • results from the national primary examinations in both kakuma and dadaab continue to improve, with 90 per cent and 67 per cent pass rates, respectively in 2016. however, due to lack of learning facilities, only 13 per cent of the learners may be enrolled in secondary school. in addition, only 25 per cent of secondary school students are girls.

  • increases in numbers of children on the streets in urban centers as well as cases of child abuse have been reported. in lodwar town, approximately 500 children (a third of them girls) are on the streets at night due to effects of drought (compared to about 60 in march 2016).

  • as of 31 january 2017, kenya hosts 496,420 refugees (159,053 in kakuma, 270,100 in dadaab, and 67,267 in nairobi). refugee influx from south sudan into kakuma refugee camp and kalobeyei continues, with 1,557 new arrivals in 2017, of which 107 are unaccompanied minors (61 boys and 46 girls) and 547 are separated children (362 boys and 185 girls). due to the worsening drought situation in south sudan and somalia, there is the likelihood of increased arrivals of drought-displaced persons in both kakuma and dadaab refugee camps, with an increased number of children suffering from malnutrition.

  • the high court of kenya has ruled against the government decision to close the dadaab refugee camps, and has ordered the re-instatement of the department of refugee affairs. further direction on the way forward is awaited from the government. in this regard, the planned closure by 31 may 2017 still stands.


Information

source: un children's fund
country: kenya, somalia, south sudan

as a result of the drought, a total of 174,000 children are not attending school in the affected counties, and 1,274 schools have no access to water, affecting 246,000 children.

highlights

  • about 2.7 million people in kenya are now in need of relief assistance, up from 1.3 million in august 20161 . the president of kenya declared a national disaster on 10 february 2017 and has called for international support.

  • the results of smart surveys conducted in january and february 2017 to monitor the emergency nutrition situation show very high levels of global acute malnutrition (gam) (above 30 per cent) in three northern counties (turkana north, north hor of marsabit, and mandera)

  • as a result of the drought, a total of 174,000 children are not attending school in the affected counties, and 1,274 schools and early childhood development (ecd) centers have no access to water, affecting 246,000 children. an increase in the number of children living in the streets in arid and semi-arid counties has been observed.

  • unicef kenya is revising its humanitarian action for children (hac) appeal funding requirements to reflect the new needs for the drought response.

situation in numbers

2.7 million people are food insecure (long rains assessment, january 2017)

2.6 million people are in need of wash assistance (ministry of water and irrigation, february 2017)

1.1 million children are food insecure (long (rains assessment, january 2017)

109,464 children under 5 in need of sam treatment

174,000 children in pre-primary and primary school are not attending school due to the drought

unicef hac appeal 2017

us$ 23,019,000

situation overview & humanitarian needs

  • below average performance of the 2016 short and long rains has led to a severe drought in the arid and semi-arid lands (asal) of kenya. as a consequence the food insecure population in kenya has more than doubled over a sixmonth period, and it is estimated that 2.7 million people in kenya are now in need of relief assistance, up from 1.3 million in august 20161 . this includes 300,000 people in non-arid and semi-arid (non-asal) counties affected by crop failures and decline of yields. most of those affected are children under-5 years, mothers, the elderly and the sick. the worst-affected counties are turkana, marsabit, samburu, tana river, isiolo, mandera, garissa, wajir and baringo. several county assemblies have voted re-alignment of development budget to drought emergency response. the government of kenya has signed a cabinet memo in november 2016 to allocate ksh 210 million for the drought response, but these funds have still to be put to full use. on 10 february 2017, the president of kenya has declared the ongoing drought a national disaster and has appealed for international support.

  • according to the integrated phase classification (ipc) for acute malnutrition conducted in february 2017, turkana north, north horr in marsabit and mandera counties reported a very critical nutrition situation (phase 5; global acute malnutrition ≥30 per cent). a critical nutrition situation (phase 4; global acute malnutrition 15.0 - 29.9 per cent) was reported in east pokot in baringo county, isiolo and turkana south, west and central. tana river county reported a serious nutrition situation (global acute malnutrition 10.0 -14.9 per cent) while tharaka nithi was in phase 2 (alert global acute malnutrition ≥ 5 to 9.9 per cent). finally kitui and kilifi were in phase 1 (acceptable global acute malnutrition <5 per cent). compared with august 2016, improvement in the nutrition situation was noted in turkana south while deterioration was noted in turkana north, isiolo mandera and marsabit counties. the nutrition situation is expected to deteriorate across all asal counties in the coming months if the dry spell persists.

  • due to the drought, access to water and sanitation continues to deteriorate in affected areas and approximately 2.6 million people are in need of water. approximately 35 per cent of rural water points were non-functional even before the drought; now it is estimated that an additional 20 per cent of water points have broken down or dried up in some areas. the cost of water has risen up to ten-fold in some counties as water points are breaking down due to extra demands or lack of water. distance to viable water sources increased up to 10-15km. per capita water consumption dropped to 5-10 litres per person per day, significantly below the minimum standard of at least 15 litres per person per day. out of the six most drought affected counties with a total of 436 health facilities, over 170 (39 per cent) facilities require water trucking.

  • the drought is also likely to negatively impact health systems, with consequent deterioration in quality and access to life-saving interventions. counties continue to record thousands of diarrheal cases associated with lack of clean water and poor hygiene, especially among children. this is exacerbated by a large number of health facilities without access to clean running water and dependence on water trucking. excessive drought related movement of pastoralist populations is also likely to reduce vaccination coverage of children and access to essential health services, including maternal and new-born care. furthermore, health services continue to be negatively impacted by the health workers strike, with the doctor’s strike entering its third month. this has, and is likely to continue, reduce the availability and quality of health provision, leading to unnecessary increases in preventable deaths.

  • the drought is affecting kenya at a moment when the cholera epidemic is still active. since december 2014, 30 out of 47 counties have been affected by cholera, of which tana river is the only county that continues to report cases. total cases reported from 10 october 2016 are 215 (164 cases in 2016 and 51 cases in 2017) with 5 deaths (case fatality rate of 2.3%). risk factors such as low latrine coverage, deep rooted social practices, poverty and high illiteracy are still prevalent in the county, and therefore, the outbreak is expected to escalate due to the ongoing drought. increased surveillance, health promotion activities and health education about cholera are re-activated in dadaab refugee camps due to the cholera outbreak in somalia.

  • ministry of health surveillance reports of 15 and 22 january show more counties reporting suspected measles outbreaks, with 36 cases reported in the week ending 15 january 2017. since the last measles rubella campaign was completed nearly one year ago and routine vaccination rates in drought affected areas are low, these cases are expected to rise, as more unvaccinated newborns enter the population.

  • data collected by unicef in january 2017 from 10 affected counties indicates that over 174,000 children (14.2 per cent of school aged population) are not attending ecd and primary schools due to drought impact, mainly lack of food and water. four schools have closed as a direct result of drought in two counties and 1,274 schools have no access to water in the same 10 counties, affecting 246,000 children. schools in both dadaab and host communities are currently experiencing lack of water and food, creating an alarming situation which may undermine the efforts to increase enrolment in most of schools. more than 50 per cent of refugees in kakuma and dadaab are under 18 years, many of whom have experienced violent conflict and displacement, and 48 per cent of whom are out of school.

  • results from the national primary examinations in both kakuma and dadaab continue to improve, with 90 per cent and 67 per cent pass rates, respectively in 2016. however, due to lack of learning facilities, only 13 per cent of the learners may be enrolled in secondary school. in addition, only 25 per cent of secondary school students are girls.

  • increases in numbers of children on the streets in urban centers as well as cases of child abuse have been reported. in lodwar town, approximately 500 children (a third of them girls) are on the streets at night due to effects of drought (compared to about 60 in march 2016).

  • as of 31 january 2017, kenya hosts 496,420 refugees (159,053 in kakuma, 270,100 in dadaab, and 67,267 in nairobi). refugee influx from south sudan into kakuma refugee camp and kalobeyei continues, with 1,557 new arrivals in 2017, of which 107 are unaccompanied minors (61 boys and 46 girls) and 547 are separated children (362 boys and 185 girls). due to the worsening drought situation in south sudan and somalia, there is the likelihood of increased arrivals of drought-displaced persons in both kakuma and dadaab refugee camps, with an increased number of children suffering from malnutrition.

  • the high court of kenya has ruled against the government decision to close the dadaab refugee camps, and has ordered the re-instatement of the department of refugee affairs. further direction on the way forward is awaited from the government. in this regard, the planned closure by 31 may 2017 still stands.


Information

source: un educational, scientific and cultural organization, international conference on the great lakes region, interpeace
country: burundi, democratic republic of the congo, rwanda

interpeace collaborates with other organizations to implement a peace education initiative that hopes to build lasting peace in rwanda, burundi, and eastern drc.

in this interview, interpeace’s great lakes programme coordinator, isabelle peter, discusses the organization’s peace education initiative in the three countries of rwanda, burundi and the eastern democratic republic of congo (drc). the peace education initiative is part of interpeace’s cross-border peacebuilding programme, implemented in collaboration with six regional organisations in the region.

what is peace education, and how does it fit into interpeace’s efforts to build lasting peace in the great lakes region?

peace education is both about content and approach. it focuses on learning about and strengthening the skills, attitudes, principles and values that individuals and communities can rely on to transform negative situations of potential conflict into more positive situations. in terms of what constitutes peace education in the context of the great lakes region, it is a concept that looks at the fundamental causes and structures that underlie the continuous conflicts that the region has experienced.

interpeace’s work on peace education was in response to a call by the people of the region themselves, who identified peace education as an important foundation for lasting peace. this emerged as a recommendation in a participatory research carried out by interpeace’s regional peacebuilding programme, which we implement together with six partner organizations in rwanda, burundi and the democratic republic of congo (drc). the mandate itself was given at a regional forum in kinshasa in december 2015. in the face of repetitive conflicts that have occurred for the last 20 years or more, citizens from the region − among them youth, religious leaders, parliamentarians, ministers, regional organizations and women’s groups − came together in kinshasa and clearly stated that peace education was absolutely necessary for the region to stand a chance at sustainable peace in the future. this shows how the people of the great lakes, in their own analysis, deeply understand the essence of peace education as a building block for lasting peace.

in the framework of interpeace’s great lakes programme, the youth emerge as a key actor, historically instrumentalized by certain groups to fight for or to assert certain vested interests, and often also manipulated to commit acts of violence. what people in the region have said is that the youth can be that transformative force that can change the future of the region. we therefore mainly target to transform the youth since they are well positioned to shape a better future for the region. although the focus is on the youth, peace education is more broadly about transforming people, shaping the attitudes and behaviour of individuals such that when faced with situations of potential conflict, they can transform these into situations that actually support peace and social cohesion.

peace education, with a particular emphasis on the youth, is then a very important approach that can support this positive role that the youth can play.

it has often been remarked that “peace education does not happen in a classroom.” what does this statement signify in the context of the great lakes region?

that is a very important statement, but it is also a challenge that we have encountered in the programme. all the stakeholders we have interacted with in the region − among them policy makers, decision makers, teachers and education systems − are trying to find a way to make peace education more practical. this matter came up when we had a regional peace education summit in nairobi in march 2016, with about 80 decision makers, policy makers and peace educational practitioners in attendance. what they said is that for peace education to really be effective, it must empower the individual to have the capacity to transform a situation, based on his or her knowledge, skills, behaviour and attitudes in line with the principles of dialogue, tolerance, mutual understanding and active listening.

let us take the example of a young person in the great lakes region, confronted with a situation where he or she is for instance being approached by a politician or by the youth wing of a political party to fight for a certain cause or to carry out some actions that are not helpful for peace. if you place yourself in the shoes of this individual, the question is: how can you transform this situation? how can you react to it in a way that can turn it into something more positive? first of all, you must be able to resist the manipulation, and you also need to see how you can engage your family or your community for them to similarly resist this kind of manipulation. what this means is that peace education needs to be something practical that individuals and communities can use in their daily lives.

one important realization that has emerged from the programme is that the education system needs to integrate a form of peace education that explains what conflict transformation entails and also integrates the history of the region. but more importantly, this needs to be done in a way that really empowers those who undergo peace education to be able to recognize situations of potential conflict and to be able to transform them. i think that when this happens, we will see a new, empowered generation that can really turn around the future of the great lakes.

interpeace has been working with the international conference on the great lakes region (icglr) and unesco on peace education for a while now. have you also been able to reach out to the national governments? how have they responded?

yes, we have been able to reach out to the national governments and their response has been generally positive. this is in following with interpeace’s approach, which seeks to bridge between the grassroots and the decision-making levels. ever since the peace education emerged as a strong recommendation from the people themselves, we have made effort to upstream this recommendation and we are engaging national and regional decision makers, to provide a viable communication channel between the grassroots and the decision makers.

incidentally, we have come to realize that all the national governments in the great lakes region already have peace education within their policies and programmes. this happened when we organized the peace education summit in nairobi back in march 2016 in collaboration with the icglr and unesco. we had high level representatives from the education ministries of rwanda, burundi and the drc, but also from uganda and south sudan. in fact, some of these states that we weren’t really targeting, came up and said they too wanted to be part of the peace education initiative. this very fact shows that there is a strong interest in promoting peace education among the various governments. so there is no doubt that the political will exists.

the key challenge that emerged in the nairobi summit is that the governments are sometimes short of the expertise required to implement peace education in a meaningful way, not just in the classrooms. for peace education to be indeed more transformative, for instance among the youth, the governments need to have certain tools at their disposal. they for instance need trained educators who know how exactly to implement peace education. another key priority that was expressed at the nairobi summit was the need to harmonize peace education on the regional level. the public statement of the icglr executive secretary in a regional newspaper article illustrates the priority that peace education has received in the region. in the article, the executive secretary expressed his wish to make peace education a priority among icglr member states, and mentioned during the summit, since his term was coming to an end, that it is an initiative that he will endeavour to pass on to his successor as executive secretary.

so generally, we have reached out to national governments, and they have been very open and willing to work on peace education. what needs additional work is how to confront the challenges facing the implementation of the policies and making them reality.

listening to you it seems that the national governments have a very pedagogical, curriculum-based approach. is there a way in which you think they can also reach, for instance, youth who are not in school?

that is a very important point. at the nairobi summit, the focus was largely on youth within the school systems. there were however discussions in the summit on the question of how to reach non-schooling youths. a key actor that the interpeace programme is working with is the religious denominations − the christian faith, islam − because they often have structures in place that allow them to reach wider demographics, including non-schooling youths. these non-schooling youths are a very important demographic because they are more prone to manipulation due to their precarious conditions. peace education of course goes beyond just the schooling system. that is why our work with the churches, mosques and other similar actors is important in reaching these youths who exist on the periphery.

how about the local communities? are they directly involved in the peace education initiative?

we work very closely with the local communities in the programme, which helps us make a distinction between formal and informal peace education. formal peace education is more of the school curriculum-oriented kind, while informal peace education is the kind that can take place outside of these formal systems. our six partner organizations particularly work very much with the local communities in terms of promoting peace education, itself a recommendation that we got informally from the grassroots populations.

one dimension of our work with the communities includes supporting cross-border dialogue spaces, which we do in collaboration with our six partner teams. we currently have six dialogues spaces across rwanda, burundi and the drc, each comprising 20 to 30 community members, among them leaders who represent different communities and socio-political constituencies. we work with these cross-border community dialogue groups to come up with and implement initiatives that foster peace education. they have taken on a number of initiatives, sometimes also involving educators, to discuss the kind of values, principles and mindsets that are important in order to build lasting peace in the region. participants in the dialogue spaces have gone further and reached out to their own communities, their own families, their own work places and to young people as well.

there is this nice story of a lady from one of our dialogue spaces who has become a sort of “go to” dialogue facilitator in her workplace. whenever there is a conflict or some kind of tension in the office, her colleagues come to her, and she uses her peacebuilder’s mindset to help them to resolve the conflict through dialogue.

a second dimension is our work with 15 civil society organizations (csos) in the three countries to amplify the peace education initiative. our partner teams engage these csos to collaboratively develop concrete initiatives, again aimed at increasing the outreach of our peacebuilding values and the peace education initiative. some of the activities have included trainings with the csos, equipping them to in turn train their own members. we also work with scouts associations from rwanda, burundi and the drc, and employ tools such as participatory theatre and video sketches to raise awareness and to transform the people we interact with into agents of change in the region.

all this work is quite profound. but then, in what unique ways would you say interpeace’s approach to peace education is different from that of other actors and stakeholders in the great lakes region?

one thing is that we acknowledge the complexity of the regional reality, and we also recognize that change is always a result of many different efforts coming together − starting with the communities’ innate capacities to prevent and transform conflicts. this is why we work with peace education actors in both the formal and informal sectors. in the formal sector, we for example collaborate with unesco. we also collaborate with other international organizations such as the aegis trust, which has carried out very impressive engagements on peace education in rwanda. in the informal sector we work with the churches and other different associations.

i think what is important is to see how we can all collaborate, to discern the gaps in the work of others that we can complement, and vice versa. so in that sense, we continue to be in communication with these like-minded organizations, and we invite them to our engagements, for example the 2016 regional peace education summit in nairobi. similarly, this month (february 2017) we were invited by unesco to speak at the sdg4 regional forum for eastern africa, which was a high level forum organized by unesco in dar es salaam, tanzania, on the implementation of the 2030 education agenda.

as interpeace, our comparative or added advantage is that we have structures and networks in place to link the grassroots level to the national and regional levels. for our work in the great lakes region, we for instance have formal collaboration with the international conference on the great lakes region (icglr) and the economic community of the great lakes countries (cegpl). these collaborations help us to see how we can foster advocacy for peace education, how we can really have a dialogue that is more inclusive, brings all tracks on board, and allows for an exchange not only between policy makers, peace education practitioners and students within the formal schooling systems, but also the international organizations and other actors and stakeholders who are involved. in all these collaborations, what is most important to us is to catalyze collective action towards fostering and better facilitating the implementation of peace education.

a second important element that interpeace and its six partners bring is the voice of the people, who clearly articulated the importance of peace education as a recommendation in a research study that involved several thousand grassroots participants. this voice of the people weighs in to boost our collaboration with other stakeholders and to leverage peace education efforts in the region.

i am sure there must be challenges in these efforts to lay a firm foundation for peace education in the region. what are some of them?

the existing challenges came out clearly at regional peace education summit in nairobi. the main challenge raised by the participants was about the actualization of the peace education policy frameworks into practice. several elements are needed for effective implementation – adequate expertise is needed, tools are needed, structures are needed, and of course there are funding needs.

these challenges may also be related to the current global political environment in terms of the donor landscape. donors and the international community want to see rapidly visible peace dividends, understandably because they are accountable to their own parliaments back at home for the funding that they provide. however, the reality is that addressing the root causes of conflicts in the great lakes, requires long processes. peace education is one important pillar in mitigating the root causes for the long term, but it is difficult to demonstrate quick peace dividends from peace education because its goal is to transform a generation.

this presents a dilemma, and may be one of the reasons why it can sometimes be difficult to have the kind of support for peace education that is needed from the international community. but on the flipside, this dilemma is also a call to action for actors working on the ground to really demonstrate why peace education is an urgent imperative.

and finally, you mentioned the recent unesco forum in dar es salaam. what key messages did interpeace seek to pass regarding peace education in the region?

together with our partner organizations in the regional cross-border programme, we used the opportunity to be the spokesperson for the needs and the priorities that the local populations have expressed to us through our programmes.

we had three primary messages that we wanted to amplify for the ministries of education from eastern africa, the un actors and other segments of the international community that were present at the forum.

our first message was to highlight the important need for peace education in the region. because this was a forum on education in general, its focus was far broader than peace education. our message was therefore that even if we have perfect education systems in place – with important aspects such as gender considerations, ict (information and communications technology) et. cetera – all of these can be undermined if there is continuous conflict in the region. the fundamental starting point is therefore to really be able to create a situation of lasting peace, which can then allow all the other systems and processes to emerge in a sustainable way. our number one message was therefore the importance and need for peace education to be included in the formal education systems.

secondly, we wanted to draw focus on the approach to peace education, not just the content. this means equipping students with the skills, principles and values that they can use in their own daily lives to transform potentially negative situations into positive ones, to actually make peacebuilders out of the students and even out of the teachers themselves – peacebuilders for peace in the region.

our third message was to emphasize the importance of a regional approach to peace education. this is because in both eastern africa and the great lakes region, we have seen how political developments in one country can spill over into neighbouring countries, sometimes with detrimental consequences. if we accept this reality, it also means that peace education efforts cannot just focus on the national level. we must take into account the regional level. so our three primary messages are the importance of peace education, peace education as both an approach and as a mindset, and thirdly the importance of the regional perspective.

we also took the opportunity to further our efforts to influence the policies and priorities of the governments present at the forum regarding peace education.

read also: a discussion paper on peace education in the great lakes region


Information

source: un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs
country: iraq

since military operations began on 19 february, some 8,000 people have fled western mosul and surrounding villages to locations south of mosul city, arriving often exhausted and dehydrated.

highlights

• since military operations in western mosul began on 19 february, approximately 8,000 people have fled from western mosul and its surrounding villages to locations south of mosul city. people arriving at these locations are often exhausted and dehydrated. emergency kits of food and water have been distributed to 8,800 people in camps and emergency sites, in addition to distributions to displaced people moving to these locations.

• humanitarian partners are expanding site capacity in hammam al alil, qayyarah and hajj ali, and supporting government efforts to expand displacement sites in jad’ah and al salamiyah through site development.

• initial trauma casualty rates from western mosul are high, with over 75 civilians treated at trauma stabilization points near front line areas. from 17 october 2016 to 22 february 2017, over 1,776 wounded civilians have been sent to erbil’s main hospitals to receive trauma care. between 8 january and 22 february, the field surgical hospital in bartalah treated 618 civilians for trauma injuries.

• significant shortages of drinking water remain a major humanitarian concern in eastern mosul city. civilians in many neighbourhoods in the southern and western parts of western mosul city also have no access to the public network and are potentially accessing untreated drinking water. the reestablishment of a functioning city-wide water network is a key priority.

situation overview

military operations in western mosul were launched on 19 february. as the operation has entered more densely populated areas, such as abu saif village and al kuwait, ma’mun, al tayaran and wadi hajar neighbourhoods, greater numbers of people have been displaced. since the operation began, approximately 8,000 people have fled from western mosul and its surrounding villages to locations south, primarily to hammam al alil town, jad’ah camp and the hajj ali and qayyarah airstrip emergency sites. people arriving at these locations are often exhausted and dehydrated. emergency packages of food, water and hygiene supplies have been distributed to 8,800 people in camps and emergency sites, in addition to emergency packages distributed to displaced people moving to these locations.

the humanitarian situation is desperate for an estimated 750,000 civilians who remain in western mosul. since november, western mosul has been cut off from its supply routes, in particular the highway from mosul into syria.

remote assessments and reports from newly displaced people indicate the shortage of food, water, petroleum, medical supplies, and the unavailability of infant formula. clean drinking water is also in very short supply in western mosul, with only some neighbourhoods in the north and northeast of western mosul city receiving water through the public network for several hours every few days. prices of basic staple foods, such as sugar and potatoes, have reportedly more than doubled.
an estimated 250,000 people could flee the fighting in the west of the city. given the narrow streets and high population density in western mosul city, particularly in the old town area, civilians are at great risk of being caught in crossfire and other forms of insecurity, and infrastructure could sustain damage. efforts are being made by humanitarian partners to accelerate and expand shelter capacity in hammam al alil, qayyarah and hajj ali, and to support government efforts to expand displacement sites in jad’ah and al salamiyah through site development.

humanitarian partners have prepositioned stocks to assist newly displaced people, including 41,700 tents, 49,000 kits of basic household items, and 77,000 emergency shelter kits, consisting of plastic sheeting, ropes, and pegs.

emergency response kits to cover the emergency food and water needs of 120,000 newly displaced people have been prepositioned in locations where they will likely be needed. some 100,000 emergency response kits, to assist 600,000 people, are available in total.

once the operating environment is conducive, humanitarian access missions will be conducted in newly retaken areas by ocha, un security and un demining teams. these access missions will then inform the rapid distribution of emergency kits of water and food to people remaining in western mosul. once people arrive at camps and emergency sites, this assistance will be followed up with complementary humanitarian aid, such as one-month food rations, tents and basic household supplies.
according to iom’s displacement tracking matrix (dtm), since fighting began on 17 october 2016, more than 223,980 people have been displaced from the eastern sections of mosul and surrounding areas, with 62,250 people having returned to their areas of origin, primarily to eastern mosul city. on 26 february, 163,896 people were living in displacement. this is an increase of approximately 4,000 people in the last week, but does not include all of the people who have been displaced in the last two days from western mosul. a dtm update including new displacements from western mosul is expected to be released on 28 february.

initial trauma casualty rates from western mosul are high, with over 75 civilians treated at trauma stabilization points near front line areas. from 17 october 2016 to 22 february 2017, over 1,776 wounded civilians have been sent to erbil’s main hospitals to receive trauma care. between 8 january and 22 february, the 50-bed type ii field surgical hospital in bartalah treated 618 civilians for trauma injuries.

significant shortages of drinking water remain a priority humanitarian concern in eastern mosul city. unicef has procured and will soon install a new 1.6mw generator at the al sahroon water treatment plant (wtp) in eastern mosul city, which was hit by indirect fire on 19 february rendering the plant inoperable. the al sahroon water treatment plant (wtp) was the only operating water treatment facility in eastern mosul city, and provided piped water to 70,000 residents and tankered water to 12 neighbourhoods. civilians in many neighbourhoods in the southern and western parts of western mosul city also have no access to the public network and are potentially accessing untreated drinking water. the re-establishment of a functioning city-wide water network is a key priority.

according to the government’s joint coordination and monitoring centre (jcmc), between 4 - 8 february the ministry of trade distributed 3,740 bags of sugar and 2,000 bags of rice through the public distribution system in newly accessible areas. between 15 - 19 february, the ministry of migration and displacement (modm) distributed food and non-food items to idps in khazer, hasansham, jad’ah, and debaga camps, and the qayyarah airstrip and haj-ali emergency sites, including 4,000 dry food parcels, 1,100 emergency food parcels, and 6,400 blankets. between 26 january and 2 february, the ministry of health and environment vaccinated 17,395 children under-5 against polio and measles.


Information

source: deutsche welle
country: chile

landslides around the capital, santiago, have contaminated a major river and cut off the drinking water supply to about 4 million people. at least three people have died and dozens are missing.

landslides around the chilean capital of santiago have contaminated a major river and cut off the drinking water supply to around 4 million people. officials have said that at least three people have died in the floods.

at least three people were killed in the rainstorms and several others were missing, authorities said on sunday.

"we are talking about 1.45 million homes that are going to be affected by the cutting off of the water supply, which will be total or partial in 30 districts" of santiago, claudio orrego, the region's governor, told reporters. more than 60 percent of the capital's 6.5 million inhabitants are likely to be affected.

aguas andinas, the company that provides santiago's water supply, said the ongoing downpours were making repairs difficult.

"we still do not know when the drinking water will be turned back on," orrego said. "we cannot guarantee resumption of the service until the river maipo clears up."

another 373 people in a mountain valley near the capital were isolated after the nearby river banks overflowed.

chile's president, michelle bachelet, wrote on twitter: "emergency teams are working on the ground to connect with isolated persons and re-establish the water supply wherever possible."

bodies recovered

chile's national emergency services reported that a 12-year-old girl was killed in the o'higgins region after a landslide swept away the car she was in. santiago officials also said they had recovered two bodies from a river just outside of the capital.

the death toll could quickly rise, however, with as many as 19 people still reported missing according to reuters news agency.

a summer of havoc

these were the second major floods to hit central chile in the past year. in april, one person was killed after heavy rainstorms battered the san jose de maipo valley.

subsequent flooding also forced some of the world's largest copper mines, located in the region, to shut down production.

chile had just this week declared an end to a state of emergency after a series forest fires devastated large parts of the country.


Information

source: un high commissioner for refugees
country: afghanistan, burundi, central african republic, chad, democratic republic of the congo, egypt, eritrea, ethiopia, germany, iran (islamic republic of), iraq, jordan, kenya, lebanon, nigeria, pakistan, somalia, south sudan, sudan, syrian arab republic, turkey, uganda, ukraine, world, yemen

most of the 3.2 million people who were driven from their homes in the first half of 2016 found shelter in low or middle income countries, according to unhcr.

poorer countries host most of the forcibly displaced – report

according to a new unhcr study, most of the 3.2 million who were driven from their homes in the first half of 2016 found shelter in low or middle income countries.

geneva – conflict, persecution and violence newly uprooted at least 3.2 million people in the first half of last year, and low- and middle-income countries played the greatest role in sheltering the world’s displaced, a new report by unhcr, the un refugee agency, has found.

in the first half of last year, 1.7 million people were newly displaced within their own country, while 1.5 million had crossed an international border, unhcr’s mid-year trends 2016 report shows.

while the numbers of newly displaced were one third lower than during the same period in 2015, when 5 million people were newly displaced, the global total continued to rise. prospects for displaced people to return to their homes remained slim while conflicts intensified.

more than half the new refugees in the first half of 2016 fled syria’s conflict, with most staying in the immediate region – turkey, jordan, lebanon and egypt. other sizable groups fled iraq, burundi, central african republic, the democratic republic of the congo, eritrea, somalia, south sudan and sudan.

while smaller in scale than the syrian crisis, south sudan’s refugee situation continues to grow and affect some of the world’s least developed countries – including sudan, uganda, kenya, drc, car, and ethiopia. at mid-2016, there were a total of 854,200 refugees from south sudan, a more than eight-fold increase in three years. numbers grew even further in the second half of 2016.

of all countries, turkey sheltered the greatest number of refugees, hosting 2.8 million by mid-2016. it was followed by pakistan (1.6 million), lebanon (1 million), iran (978,000), ethiopia (742,700), jordan (691,800), kenya (523,500), uganda (512,600), germany (478,600) and chad (386,100).

“today we face not so much a crisis of numbers but of cooperation and solidarity – especially given that most refugees stay in the countries neighbouring their war-torn homelands,” said un high commissioner for refugees filippo grandi.

by comparing the number of refugees to the size of a country’s population or its economy, unhcr’s report brings the contribution made by host nations sharply into context. for example, relative to the sizes of their populations, lebanon and jordan host the largest number of refugees, while in terms of economic performance the biggest burdens are carried by south sudan and chad.

according to the latter economic measure, eight out of ten of the top countries hosting refugees are in africa, with the remaining two in the middle east. lebanon and jordan rank among the top ten hosting countries across all categories – absolute numbers, economic contribution and per capita.

at mid-2016, syrians continued to be the largest group of refugees worldwide, making up 32 per cent (5.3 million out of 16.5 million) of the global total under unhcr’s mandate.

another key finding of unhcr’s report was that submissions for resettlement increased, reflecting a rise in places allocated to the programme by a growing band of countries. more than 81,100 people were submitted to 34 states in the first half of 2016, with the final yearly figure having surpassed 160,000 – a 20-year high, and more than twice the number of submissions in 2012.


Information

source: un children's fund
country: chad, côte d'ivoire, egypt, eritrea, guinea, italy, libya, niger, nigeria, senegal, somalia, sudan, world

a unicef report that provides an in-depth look at the risks facing refugee and migrant children as they make the journey from sub-saharan africa into libya and across the sea to italy.

unicef calls for implementation of six-point agenda for action to keep refugee and migrant children safe

new york/geneva, 28 february 2017 – refugee and migrant children and women are routinely suffering sexual violence, exploitation, abuse and detention along the central mediterranean migration route from north africa to italy, unicef warned in a new report.

‘a deadly journey for children: the central mediterranean migrant route’ provides an in-depth look at the extreme risks facing refugee and migrant children as they make the perilous journey from sub-saharan africa into libya and across the sea to italy. three quarters of the refugee and migrant children interviewed as part of a survey said they had experienced violence, harassment or aggression at the hands of adults at some point over the course of their journey, while nearly half of the women and children interviewed reported sexual abuse during migration – often multiple times and in multiple locations.

last year, at least 4,579 people died attempting to cross the mediterranean from libya, or 1 in every 40 of those who made the attempt. it is estimated that at least 700 of those who lost their lives were children.

“the central mediterranean from north africa to europe is among the world’s deadliest and most dangerous migrant routes for children and women,” said afshan khan, unicef regional director and special coordinator for the refugee and migrant crisis in europe. “the route is mostly controlled by smugglers, traffickers and other people seeking to prey upon desperate children and women who are simply seeking refuge or a better life. we need safe and legal pathways and safeguards to protect migrating children that keep them safe and keep predators at bay.”

recent data in a survey of women and child migrants in libya during late 2016 reveal the appalling level of abuse along the migration route. at the time of the survey, 256,000 migrants were recorded in libya, including 30,803 women and 23,102 children - a third of whom were unaccompanied. the real figures, however, are believed to be at least three times higher.

most children and women indicated that they had paid smugglers at the beginning of their journey, leaving many in debt under ‘pay as you go’ arrangements and vulnerable to abuse, abduction and trafficking.

women and children also reported harsh and overcrowded conditions, including lack of nutritious food and adequate shelter, in libyan detention centres run by both government and armed militias.

“children should not be forced to put their lives in the hands of smugglers because there are simply no alternatives,” said khan. “we need to address globally the drivers of migration and work together toward a robust system of safe and legal passage for children on the move, whether refugees or migrants.”

unicef has developed a six-point agenda for action for children uprooted, including:

  1. protect child refugees and migrants, particularly unaccompanied children, from exploitation and violence.

  2. end the detention of children seeking refugee status or migrating by introducing a range of practical alternatives.

  3. keep families together as the best way to protect children and give them legal status.

  4. keep all refugee and migrant children learning and give them access to health and other quality services.

  5. press for action on the underlying causes of large-scale movements of refugees and migrants.

  6. promote measures to combat xenophobia, discrimination and marginalization in countries of transit and destination.

unicef is urging governments and the eu to support and adopt this agenda for action.

since the start of the response in late 2015, unicef has continued to respond to the needs of children who are on the move, stranded or seeking asylum in europe. this includes providing 182,500 refugee and migrant children with a wide range of services. the children’s agency is also expanding its mediterranean program in greece and italy, supporting government efforts to improve reunification and child protection services.

despite operating challenges in libya, unicef, along with its partners, continues its efforts to address the protection and humanitarian needs of the most vulnerable children in the country, including refugee and migrant children through municipalities with which unicef signed memoranda of cooperation in april 2015.

about unicef unicef promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do. together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere. for more information about unicef and its work visit: www.unicef.org

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for more information, or for interviews, please contact: christopher tidey, unicef new york, +1 917 340 3017, [email protected]
sarah crowe, spokesperson unicef geneva +41 79 543 8029, [email protected]


Information

source: union of medical care and relief organizations
country: syrian arab republic

several areas such as harasta and ghouta have witnessed a sharp rise in attacks on medical facilities and civilian areas. they are unable to keep up to provide medical aid, relief and supplies.

toronto, on- harasta, in eastern ghouta in the damascus suburbs was attacked for the third time in ten days with a suspected chemical agent. the two areas are facing fierce bombardment, while running very low on the capacity to provide medical aid, relief and supplies.

in harasta there was an airstrike at 7:15 p.m. damascus time, with two missiles, suspected of carrying a chemical agent, causing symptoms, such as suffocation, consistent with exposure to chlorine gas. tens were affected by inhalation of the suspected gas, among them were six children, five women, and one white helmet worker. the white helmets civil defense worked relentlessly for two hours to evacuate victims to a safer area.

medical staff and doctors sent out a desperate plea yesterday for ngos to demand an immediate end to the indiscriminate bombardment of the area. hospitals and medical facilities are unable to keep up with the constant influx of casualties from airstrikes and bombings, citing many deaths, and many losing limbs from the attacks.

several areas throughout syria have witnessed a sharp rise in attacks on medical facilities and civilian areas. according to the turkey health cluster, on february 25, a hospital in idlib was hit by an airstrike causing damage and putting the facility out of service. on february 24, a medical staff was wounded in an attack on hospital in damascus causing them to go out of service. on that same day a primary health care center was attacked and put out of service, five medical staff were wounded in the attack.

on february 23, it was reported that napalm was used in four ghouta civilian neighbourhoods, causing massive fires and many reported unconfirmed casualties in the area.

in ghouta there were several attacks throughout the week as two area hospitals were hit and put out of service. on wednesday february 22, the qaboon civil hospital, and the qaboon al hayat hospital were put out of service after being attacked by missiles. there were several casualties reported, yet still unconfirmed. a representative from the uossm media office in ghouta said that the hospitals were directly targeted. many wounded patients that were receiving treatment were transferred to another facility. the hospital provided emergency care, outpatient clinics, optometry clinics and ob/gyn services to residents of the area.

on tuesday february 21, there were reports of suspected chemical attacks in ghouta. a total of eight missiles were dropped in the damascus suburbs carrying a suspected chemical agent, many of the symptoms patients experienced were consistent with chlorine inhalation, including suffocation and choking.

many chronically ill patients in ghouta face death, especially patients with renal failure as supplies for dialysis are very low.

on wednesday february 22, a nurse was killed in the suburbs of hama as she was trying to evacuate people wounded in an attack to a safe location.

on monday february 21, another hospital in idlib, was put out service after it was targeted by airstrikes. according to the turkey health cluster, seven people were killed and several others were wounded, there were no casualties from the staff. the hospital provided 4900 consultations, 1700 admission and 280 major surgeries per month.

dr. khaula sawah, ceo of uossm usa said, “we are very concerned with the escalation of attacks in ghouta, and waar, the areas have been under siege for over six months, it is vital that medications and equipment be allowed in these areas as many patients require certain medications in order to survive. we demand that the international community call for an immediate halt to the indiscriminate bombing and targeting of area hospitals and facilities, and the immediate entry of medical supplies and equipment desperately needed by people in these areas.“

media inquiries and interviews please contact :

name: avi d'souza
global director of communications
email: [email protected]


Information

source: un children's fund, save the children, education cluster
country: iraq

more than 56,000 school age children have recently been displaced by the mosul offensive. of these, 26,985 are currently not accessing any form of education.

key figures

  • 56,605 school age children are among the recently displaced people by the mosul offensive since 17th of october. while the current returns to the newly retaken areas were reducing idp numbers, the fears of hostilities in western mosul are increasing the new arrivals in the camps.

  • 29,621 children (46.9% females) are accessing non-formal education in the 25 temporary learning spaces established in the camps, with a significant number more to be established over the coming weeks.

  • 6,915 (50.4% girls) children are accessing formal education in the 12 formal school spaces established in the camps in hasansham u3, hasansham m2 and khazer m1.

humanitarian needs

  • limited number of dma accredited agencies who are authorized to deliver mine risk education sessions in schools. education cluster is seeking solutions with mine action sub-cluster, including the usage of dma stickers/posters in temporary learning spaces, until mre sessions can be arranged.

  • urgent clearance of explosive hazards needs to be undertaken in newly accessible areas where schools are being reopened by ninewa directorate of education (doe).

  • shortage of federal moe teachers in the camps is limiting the opening of the completed formal learning temporary learning centres. doe ninewa is responsible for the operating of these formal tented schools, in terms of providing federal moe teachers and curriculum textbooks. solutions being sought with doe to fill such gaps.

  • minor repairs and rehabilitations of schools in eastern mosul is needed to ensure that schools are safe for re-opening (including windows, doors, clean-up of glass and rubble, servicing of school water supply, fuel for heaters, etc.).

  • among people recently displaced by the mosul emergency, 56,605 are school age children (35% of the population coming from eastern mosul city). of these, 26,985 are currently not accessing any form of education


Information

source: reach initiative
country: kenya, somalia

the increasing numbers of somalis returning from kenya add to the already difficult situation of idps coping with food insecurity and inadequate shelter.

the year 2016 has seen a continued deterioration of the humanitarian situation in somalia. following three failed rain seasons, which aggravated the already severe drought conditions, and the government of kenya’s initial decision to close dadaab, the world’s largest refugee camp hosting over 300,000 somalis, population movements within somalia and from kenya have intensified throughout 2016. by october 2016, over 30,000 somali people had already returned from kenyaand numbers are only expected to increase. with limited understanding of movement patterns of internally displaced persons (idps) and returnees, the humanitarian response risks being ultimately unprepared to provide needs-based and targeted aid to affected communities.

in order to provide a better understanding of displacement patterns and inform effective service delivery in idp settlements, reach conducted a series of assessments in the main idp settlements in somalia. kismayo was selected as the first district for this assessment due to the large number of idps and increase in returnees from the daadab refugee camp. specifically, three selected areas around kismayo town were assessed, namely dalxiska, kismayo east, and kismayo west, by carrying out over 1,200 household interviews, 75 key informant interviews, facility mapping, and spatial analysis.

the report highlights the severity of food security in the area, with 66% of the assessed households in dalxiska reporting a poor food consumption score. while the percentage is considerably lower in kismayo east/west, the overall situation in the area calls for urgent action by local governments and humanitarian organizations alike. the need for improved shelter conditions in both assessed areas is also high, with 38% of the households residing in emergency or temporary shelters. additionally, the percentage of reported damage to shelters by the household representatives in dalxiska was as high as 49%, with 21% of the shelters reported as completely damaged.

more detailed findings from the multi-cluster needs assessment in kisimayo are outlined in the kismayo idp settlement assessment report.

in light of the expected increase in returnees from dadaab and the worsening food security conditions in somalia, reach will continue to conduct multi sectoral needs assessments in areas hosting idp and returnee communities. indeed, only with a comprehensive understanding of service deliveries, population needs, as well as causes and intentions of displacement can the humanitarian response effectively support a population plagued by years of drought, conflict, and economic adversities.


Information

source: un children's fund, save the children, education cluster
country: iraq

more than 56,000 school age children have recently been displaced by the mosul offensive. of these, 26,985 are currently not accessing any form of education.

key figures

  • 56,605 school age children are among the recently displaced people by the mosul offensive since 17th of october. while the current returns to the newly retaken areas were reducing idp numbers, the fears of hostilities in western mosul are increasing the new arrivals in the camps.

  • 29,621 children (46.9% females) are accessing non-formal education in the 25 temporary learning spaces established in the camps, with a significant number more to be established over the coming weeks.

  • 6,915 (50.4% girls) children are accessing formal education in the 12 formal school spaces established in the camps in hasansham u3, hasansham m2 and khazer m1.

humanitarian needs

  • limited number of dma accredited agencies who are authorized to deliver mine risk education sessions in schools. education cluster is seeking solutions with mine action sub-cluster, including the usage of dma stickers/posters in temporary learning spaces, until mre sessions can be arranged.

  • urgent clearance of explosive hazards needs to be undertaken in newly accessible areas where schools are being reopened by ninewa directorate of education (doe).

  • shortage of federal moe teachers in the camps is limiting the opening of the completed formal learning temporary learning centres. doe ninewa is responsible for the operating of these formal tented schools, in terms of providing federal moe teachers and curriculum textbooks. solutions being sought with doe to fill such gaps.

  • minor repairs and rehabilitations of schools in eastern mosul is needed to ensure that schools are safe for re-opening (including windows, doors, clean-up of glass and rubble, servicing of school water supply, fuel for heaters, etc.).

  • among people recently displaced by the mosul emergency, 56,605 are school age children (35% of the population coming from eastern mosul city). of these, 26,985 are currently not accessing any form of education


Information

source: un country team in mozambique
country: mozambique

according to the un country team, $10.2 million is required to reach 150,000 people with life-saving assistance and protection over the next three months.

an overview of the crisis

cyclone dineo made landfall on the coast of inhambane province, south of mozambique the night of wednesday february 15th 2017 accompanied by winds of 160 kilometers per hour. it finally dissipated over south africa and zimbabwe on friday february 17th.

according to the provincial authorities of inhambane, the cyclone affected about 550,691 people (112,513families) which 7,651 families were considered most vulnerable. at least 33,712 houses were totally and 71,294 partially destroyed being massinga, morrumbene, maxixe and inhambane city the most affected districts. in terms of infrastructure, 389 government offices, 70 health units including 52 maternities as well as 1,687 classrooms were partially destroyed. the education authorities estimated 160,000 students and 5,500 teachers were affected. maternal and arvt services were disrupted, so increase in srh-related morbility and mortality might be expected. in the affected area about 14,000 women are expecting to give birth in next three months while approximately 2,100 of them may face risk of obstetric complications requiring emergency obstetric care. it is also estimated that 9-15% of all newborns may require lifesaving emergency care.

furthermore, there was downfall of 899 power poles leaving 8 districts without electricity for at least five days affecting the water supply in maxixe and inhambane city.

the authorities reported a death toll of 7 and 101 people injured. during the cyclone about 949 people were hosted in three transit centers in maxixe city. as of 19 february 2017, with the improvement of the weather people returned to their houses and transit centers were closed.

in the agriculture sector, approximately 29,173 ha of several crops were lost being massinga, morrumbene, inhambane and funhalouro the most affected districts. moreover, about 135,865 fruit trees (cashew and coconut trees) were lost. these fruit trees represent an important source of incomes for the population affected (most of affected districts were massinga, inharrime, morrumbene and jangamo districts). the authorities estimated a need of 128 tons of diverse seeds among cereals, pulses, vegetables and tubers.

it is important to acknowledge the early warning issued by the government authorities before the landfall of the cyclone. on 13th february 2017, the government called the technical council for disaster management for a meeting to discuss and recommend the prevention and readness measures which included the communication to the local government in concerned provinces, activation of local committees for disaster management, intensification of monitoring measures, awareness of the population in risk areas to move to safe areas among other measure.the government estimates an overall funding requirements of us$ 16.5 million to restore from the damages caused by dineo cyclone which us$ 6.7 million are needed immediately. this funding estimation refers to support needed on infrastructure, agriculture and humanitarian assistance. the government allocated 160 million mt from the contingency plan (us$ 2.3 million) for immediate interventions.

the response to date has been provided by the government with support of humanitarian country team and included provision of tents for maternity services in affected health units in maxixe and morrumbene, provision of fuel for emergency water pumping in inhambane, provision of food and shelter kits for the most vulnerable people as well as food for work/assets for road cleaning/debris removal. on 22 february 2017, the government invited the donors and partners to request for support to respond to the existing needs.


Information

source: irin
country: yemen

the taiz governorate, which is heading into its third year of conflict, is one of the worst affected areas in a country facing the largest food insecurity emergency in the world.

taiz/uniquba/aden, 1 march 2017

it has been almost two years since yemen’s third-largest city had running water or electricity. worn down by relentless shelling and street-to-street fighting, taiz is heading into its third year of conflict. but while the seemingly unending hostilities drag on, civilians, every day, face an ever more deadly fight: a battle against starvation.

read more on irin


Information

source: médecins sans frontières
country: burundi, united republic of tanzania

january saw the largest rate of new arrivals in a single month since may 2015, with nearly 19,000 people crossing the border into tanzania, over three-quarters of whom are burundian.

pressure is mounting in tanzanian refugee camps as the flow of refugees from burundi continues on a large scale. january saw the largest rate of new arrivals in a single month since may 2015, with nearly 19,000 people crossing the border into tanzania, according to the unhcr.

some 290,000 refugees, over three-quarters of whom are burundian, are crammed into three overstretched camps: nyarugusu, mtendeli and nduta.

nduta camp – already full in november last year – is now overflowing and is currently home to 117,000 people, more than double its intended capacity. with between 600 and 1,000 people arriving per day, it is expected the camp will reach 150,000 by mid-april.

david nash, head of mission for msf, emphasises the urgent need to identify a site for a fourth camp and establish it immediately.

“msf has repeatedly called for this, but we are still not seeing concrete action being taken,” he says. “although agencies have begun to scale up assistance, the humanitarian response still does not match the rate of new arrivals. with insufficient shelter available, people are forced to spend more time in overcrowded communal shelters, where the risk of disease is much higher.”

as refugees arrive, medical pressures grow

in nduta camp, where msf is the main health provider, medical teams have seen a fourfold increase in the number of outpatient consultations. malaria is the major concern and with the rainy season putting additional pressure on already overcrowdeas refugees arrive, medical pressures grow.

sexual and reproductive health services are in high demand in nduta. deliveries more than doubled during the last four months of 2016, and over 400 babies were born in january. young children, pregnant women and new mothers are particularly vulnerable to illness.

“there is a real fear that we may witness a health crisis if crowding gets worse and facilities are unable to meet the needs of people arriving,” says nash.

refugee status under threat

efforts to meet the shelter, medical and hygiene needs of refugees will also need to take into consideration the recent decision by the tanzanian government to revoke the prima facie status of burundian refugees arriving into the country.

since the emergency began in april 2015, all burundians arriving into tanzania have been automatically granted refugee status. the decision to change this approach means new arrivals will now have their refugee status determined individually, a process that may affect the humanitarian assistance that can be made available to them.

“tanzania in recent years has generously hosted hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing acute crisis,” nash says. “international donors must drastically increase their support to the tanzanian government to ensure it continues to respect refugee conventions and provide safe refuge for as long as people continue to flee. we again call for a rapid scale-up of aid to support the ever-increasing number of refugees entering tanzania.”

msf has worked in tanzania since may 2015. currently, teams are working in nyarugusu and nduta camps. in nyarugusu, msf runs a 40-bed stabilisation unit and three malaria clinics and provides mental health support. in nduta, msf is the major medical provider, running a 120-bed hospital and five health posts, and providing mental health support.


Information

source: un children's fund
country: south sudan, sudan

the security situation continues to deteriorate in certain areas of unity, upper nile, jonglei and greater equatoria, causing affected populations to move to neighboring areas within and outside the country.

highlights

  • on 20 february, famine was officially declared in parts of unity state.
    this is the first time in six years that a famine has been declared anywhere in the world. approximately 100,000 people are currently facing starvation, with an additional one million close to famine.

  • a recent assessment mission by unicef, wfp and oxfam to kapoeta,
    eastern equatoria found that drought has significantly affected water access and food security. a multilateral response is planned and underway.

  • following a scale-up of cholera response activities, the number of new cases reported has declined significantly. efforts continue to halt the current outbreak, which has been ongoing since june 2016.

situation overview & humanitarian needs

on 20 february, south sudan became the first country in six years to officially declare famine. the declaration was made when a new integrated food security phase classification (ipc) report was officially endorsed and released by the national bureau of statistics (nbs). according to the report, some counties in unity state are classified as currently being in famine or having a high likelihood/risk of famine. from february to july 2017, leer and mayendit counties are considered to be experiencing famine, and famine is also likely to occur in koch county. in panyijar county it is projected that famine will likely be avoided with appropriate humanitarian assistance. approximately 100,000 people currently face starvation, while one million are on the edge of famine. for the period from february to april 2017, the beginning of the lean season, it is estimated that some 4.9 million people (approximately 42 per cent of population) are severely food insecure (ipc phases 3, 4 and 5). this is projected to increase to 5.5 million people (47 per cent of the population) at the height of the 2017 lean season in may – july 2017. president kiir has promised unrestricted humanitarian access to the areas affected by famine, many of which are currently inaccessible.

the security situation continues to deteriorate in certain areas of unity, upper nile, jonglei and greater equatoria, causing affected populations to move to neighboring areas within and outside the country. internally displaced people (idps) from kajo-keji and yei in central equatoria have moved into uganda, where a new refugee camp has been established by unhcr to accommodate the significant influx of south sudanese refugees. heavy fighting has taken place in upper nile and jonglei, and on 20 february more than 30 humanitarian workers were relocated from yuai following clashes between the sudan people’s liberation army (spla) and the spla – in opposition (spla-io).

water tables in many parts of country remain low as the dry season continues. the situation is exacerbated by a fuel shortage in the country, which is impacting the operation of urban water systems and water pumping and treatment plants. water availability in both juba and wau town have been affected. the harsh dry season currently affecting the country is having a negative impact on the already extremely critical food security situation. greater kapoeta in eastern equatoria, bordering kenya and ethiopia, is believed to be the main area in the country affected by the pro-longed dry spell.

the cholera outbreak once again appears to be declining. though active transmission is still ongoing in four different states, there has been a decline in the number of new cases reported; 57 cases were reported between 13 and 19 february, while only 18 new cases were reported between 20 and 26 february. the current outbreak has lasted longer than those of 2014 and 2015, but the case fatality rate for the 2016/2017 outbreak is significantly lower, indicating that awareness and response activities have been successful. the outbreak has concentrated along the river nile, where populations consume contaminated water directly from the river. cumulatively, 5,085 cholera cases including 105 deaths (case fatality rate of 2.06 per cent) have been reported since the outbreak began on 18 june 2016.

meanwhile, a total of 28 measles cases have been reported in the past two weeks; 25 cases in the wau area, one case in yambio, one case in the bor poc site, and one case in aweil. this brings the total number of cases reported in 2017 to 288, though there have not been any reported deaths.


Information