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encrypted communication is now the norm for applications on the internet. at heroku, part of our mission is to spread encryption by making it easy for developers to setup and use ssl on every application. today we take a big step forward in that mission by making heroku ssl generally available, allowing you to easily add ssl encryption to your applications with nothing more than a valid ssl certificate and custom domain. heroku ssl is free for custom domains on hobby dynos and above and relies on the sni (“server name indication”) extension which is now supported by the vast majority of browsers and client libraries. the current ssl endpoint will remain available for the increasingly rare instances where your applications need to support legacy clients and browsers that do not support

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/2j3IzA3Yr6Q/ssl-is-now-included-on-all-paid-dynos
today we’re happy to announce that the sydney, australia region is now generally available for use with heroku private spaces. sydney joins virginia, oregon, frankfurt, and tokyo as regions where private spaces can be created by any heroku enterprise user. developers can now deploy heroku apps closer to customers in the asia-pacific area to reduce latency and take advantage of the advanced network & trust controls of spaces to ensure sensitive data stays protected. usage to create a private space in sydney, select the spaces tab in heroku dashboard in heroku enterprise, then click the “new space” button and choose “sydney, australia” from the the space region dropdown. after a private space in sydney is created, heroku apps can be created inside it as normal. heroku postgres,

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/YoqH3OL9N-U/private-spaces-sydney-region
as we begin 2017, we want to thank you for supporting heroku. your creativity and innovation continues to inspire us, and pushed us to deliver even more new products and features in 2016. we especially want to thank everyone who helped us by beta testing, sharing heroku with others, and providing feedback. here are the highlights of what became generally available in 2016. advancing the developer experience heroku pipelines a new way to structure, manage and visualize continuous delivery. heroku review apps test code at a shareable url using disposable heroku apps that spin up with each github pull request. free ssl for apps on paid dynos get ssl encryption on custom domains for free on apps that use paid dynos. the new heroku cli take advantage of the cli’s faster performance and new us

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/uHzS3iVMQmE/heroku-2016-retrospective
today we are announcing a significant enhancement to heroku external objects: write support. salesforce users can now create, read, update, and delete records that physically reside in any heroku postgres database from within their salesforce deployment. increasingly, developers need to build applications with the sophistication and user experience of the consumer internet, coupled with the seamless customer experience that comes from integration with salesforce. heroku external objects enable a compelling set of integrations scenarios between heroku and salesforce deployments, allowing postgres to be updated based on business processes or customer records in salesforce. with heroku external objects, data persisted in heroku postgres is presented as an external object in salesforce. extern

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/uLaFQkmyN6A/heroku-external-objects-support-for-writes
austen ito is a software engineer at leading online fashion brand bonobos, based in new york. read our bonobos customer story for more information about how heroku has helped their business. what do you have running on heroku? we’re running just about everything on heroku, including our bonobos.com website, cross-app messaging services, an api for our erp, as well as some internal tools. the only pieces that are not on heroku are the data science and erp components. we’re also using desk.com for customer service queuing. walk us through your stack we use a mix of backbone and react in terms of javascript frameworks on the front end. some of our legacy work is in backbone and our newer work is in react, so we’re slowly moving the old work to react. we’re using a flux-like framework

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/8YcIRzv5geA/bonobos-on-heroku
postgres is our favorite database—it’s reliable, powerful and secure. here are a few essential tips learned from building, and helping our customers build, apps around postgres. these tips will help ensure you get the most out of postgres, whether you’re running it on your own box or using the heroku postgres add-on. use a connection pooler postgres connections are not free, as each established connection has a cost. by using a connection pooler, you’ll reduce the number of connections you use and reduce your overhead. most postgres client libraries include a built-in connection pooler; make sure you’re using it. you might also consider using our pgbouncer buildpack if your application requires a large number of connections. pgbouncer is a server-side connection pooler and connec

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/sb7H2OH-GX0/postgres-essentials
heroku bumped its bundler version to 1.13.7 almost a month ago, and since then we've had a large number of support tickets opened, many a variant of the following: your ruby version is <x>, but your gemfile specified <y> i wanted to talk about why you might get this error while deploying to heroku, and what you can do about it, along with some bonus features provided by the new bundler version. why? first off, why are you getting this error? on heroku in our ruby version docs, we mention that you can use a ruby directive in your gemfile to specify a version of ruby. for example if you wanted 2.3.3 then you would need this: # gemfile ruby "2.3.3" this is still the right way to specify a version, however recent versions of bundler introduced a cool new feature. to u

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/6tCQEF1SYlQ/bundler-and-canonical-ruby-version
so you want to build an app with react? "getting started" is easy… and then what? react is a library for building user interfaces, which comprise only one part of an app. deciding on all the other parts — styles, routers, npm modules, es6 code, bundling and more — and then figuring out how to use them is a drain on developers. this has become known as javascript fatigue. despite this complexity, usage of react continues to grow. the community answers this challenge by sharing boilerplates. these boilerplates reveal the profusion of architectural choices developers must make. that official "getting started" seems so far away from the reality of an operational app. new, zero-configuration experience inspired by the cohesive developer experience provided by ember.js

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/lO-V9bdEriA/deploying-react-with-zero-configuration
today we are announcing the newest version of the heroku cli. we know how much time you spend in the cli as developers and how much pride you take in being able to get things done quickly. our new cli has big improvements in performance as well as enhanced readability for humans and machines. tuned for performance cli response time is made up of two parts: the api response time and the performance of the cli itself, and the latter is where we’ve made big improvements. while a typical unix user should experience responses that are around half a second faster, the biggest gains are for windows users, as the new cli no longer has a ruby wrapper. when we measured the time it takes for the info command in the old vs. new cli, it decreases from 1690 to 1210 milliseconds in unix, and 3409 to 94

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/3cti94AlOaw/the-new-heroku-cli
scott raio is co-founder and cto of combatant gentlemen, a design-to-delivery menswear e-commerce brand. read our combatant gentlemen customer story to learn more about how heroku helped them build a successful online business. what microservices are you running in heroku private spaces? we’ve written an individual service for every business use case. for example, we have services for order processing, product catalog, account management, authentication, swatch display, pos, logistics, payments, etc. with all these different services, we chose heroku private spaces as a way to make service discovery easier. we’re currently running about 25 services, which is a relatively small number compared to netflix or twitter (who employ hundreds of services). but we’re growing, and we’re alwa

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/_bY0X2bx2Gc/combatant-gentlemen-service-discovery
today we're announcing two new features that will help you better manage and run apps on heroku: threshold alerting and hobby dyno metrics. threshold alerting provides the ability to set notification thresholds for key performance and health indicators of your app. we’ve also extended basic application metrics to hobby dynos to provide basic health monitoring and application guidance. together these features allow you to stay focused on building functionality by letting the platform handle your app monitoring. threshold alerting there are many ways to measure the health of an application. the new alerting feature focuses on what is most important to the end users of your app: responsiveness and request failures. responsiveness is measured by tracking the maximum response time for 95%

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/ouc7orR8hdA/threshold-alerting-generally-available
we’re excited to announce that heroku autoscaling is now generally available for apps using web dynos. we’ve always made it seamless and simple to scale apps on heroku - just move the slider. but we want to go further, and help you in the face of unexpected demand spikes or intermittent activity. part of our core mission is delivering a first-class operational experience that provides proactive notifications, guidance, and—where appropriate—automated responses to particular application events. today we take another big step forward in that mission with the introduction of autoscaling. autoscaling makes it effortless to meet demand by horizontally scaling your web dynos based on what’s most important to your end users: responsiveness. to measure responsiveness, heroku autoscaling

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/2No3kC6xmcQ/heroku-autoscaling
postgresql 9.6 is now generally available for heroku postgres. the main focus of this release is centered around performance. postgresql 9.6 includes enhanced parallelism for key capabilities that sets the stage for significant performance improvements for a variety of analytic and transactional workloads. with 9.6, certain actions, like individual queries, can be split up into multiple parts and performed in parallel. this means that everything from running queries, creating indexes, and sorting have major improvements that should allow a number of different workloads to execute faster than they had in prior releases of postgresql. with 9.6, the postgresql community, along with heroku’s own open source contributions to this release (a special thanks to peter geoghegan), have laid the fo

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/m_wBhc8vP-Q/postgresql-96-general-availability
redis might sound like it’s just a key/value store, but its versatility makes it a valuable swiss army knife for your application. caching, queueing, geolocation, and more: redis does it all. we’ve built (and helped our customers build) a lot of apps around redis over the years, so we wanted to share a few tips that will ensure you get the most out of redis, whether you’re running it on your own box or using the heroku redis add-on. use a connection pooler by using a connection pooler, you'll reduce the connection overhead and therefore speed up operations while reducing the number of connections you use. most redis libraries will provide you with a specific connection pooler implementation; you just have to make sure you use them. measure, compare, and adapt the size of your red

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/Nsn3M8U_8nQ/real-world-redis-tips
many of the compelling and engaging application experiences we enjoy every day are powered by event-based systems; requesting a ride and watching its progress, communicating with a friend or large group in real time, or connecting our increasingly intelligent devices to our phones and each other. behind the scenes, similar architectures let developers connect separate services into single systems, or process huge data streams to generate real-time insights. together, these event-driven architectures and systems are quickly becoming a powerful complement to the relational database and app server models that have been at the core of internet applications for over twenty years. at heroku, we want to make the power of this increasingly important model available to a broader range of developers

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/bC5R7UAOt84/kafka-on-heroku-generally-available
the most innovative apps augment our human senses, intuition, and logic with machine learning. deep learning, modelled after the neural networks of the human brain, continues to grow as one of the most powerful types of machine learning. when applied to images, deep learning enables powerful computer vision features like visual search, product identification, and brand detection. today, we bring you the einstein vision add-on (beta), allowing heroku developers to easily connect to and use einstein vision, a set of powerful new apis for building ai-powered apps. with this release, salesforce is making it easy for you to embed image recognition directly into your apps. rather than building and managing the specialized infrastructure needed to host deep learning models, simply connect to eins

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/Vvqy55D22vg/einstein-vision-image-recognition
the most innovative apps augment our human senses, intuition, and logic with machine learning. deep learning, modelled after the neural networks of the human brain, continues to grow as one of the most powerful types of machine learning. when applied to images, deep learning enables powerful computer vision features like visual search, product identification, and brand detection. today, we bring you the einstein vision add-on (beta), allowing heroku developers to easily connect to and use einstein vision, a set of powerful new apis for building ai-powered apps. with this release, salesforce is making it easy for you to embed image recognition directly into your apps. rather than building and managing the specialized infrastructure needed to host deep learning models, simply connect to eins

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/Vvqy55D22vg/einstein-vision-image-recognition
choices are an important part of a healthy open source software community. that’s why we’re excited about yarn, a new package manager that addresses many of the problems with node’s default package manager, npm. while npm has done a fantastic job creating a large and vibrant javascript ecosystem, i want to share why yarn is an important addition to the node.js ecosystem, how it will improve your node.js development experience, and how heroku has incorporated it into the build process for your heroku apps. we began testing yarn almost immediately after it was released, and began fully supporting it on december 16. about yarn yarn was released in october 2016 and made a big splash immediately. and while it came out of facebook, yarn is a true open source project: it has a bsd license,

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/ERx9EVrMFjM/yarn-deterministic-dependency-resolution
choices are an important part of a healthy open source software community. that’s why we’re excited about yarn, a new package manager that addresses many of the problems with node’s default package manager, npm. while npm has done a fantastic job creating a large and vibrant javascript ecosystem, i want to share why yarn is an important addition to the node.js ecosystem, how it will improve your node.js development experience, and how heroku has incorporated it into the build process for your heroku apps. we began testing yarn almost immediately after it was released, and began fully supporting it on december 16. about yarn yarn was released in october 2016 and made a big splash immediately. and while it came out of facebook, yarn is a true open source project: it has a bsd license,

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/ERx9EVrMFjM/yarn-deterministic-dependency-resolution
choices are an important part of a healthy open source software community. that’s why we’re excited about yarn, a new package manager that addresses many of the problems with node’s default package manager, npm. while npm has done a fantastic job creating a large and vibrant javascript ecosystem, i want to share why yarn is an important addition to the node.js ecosystem, how it will improve your node.js development experience, and how heroku has incorporated it into the build process for your heroku apps. we began testing yarn almost immediately after it was released, and began fully supporting it on december 16. about yarn yarn was released in october 2016 and made a big splash immediately. and while it came out of facebook, yarn is a true open source project: it has a bsd license,

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/ERx9EVrMFjM/yarn-deterministic-dependency-resolution
kyle seaman is director of farm technology for freight farms, producer of pre-assembled, iot-enabled, hydroponic farms inside repurposed freight containers. read the freight farms customer story to learn more about how heroku has helped the company scale their business. what is freight farms? our flagship product, the leafy green machine (lgm), is a complete, commercial-ready, hydroponic growing system assembled inside a repurposed shipping container. each of our 100+ farms is connected to an iot network built on heroku. tell us about your stack. we’re running the open source version of the parse server on heroku. our stack is mostly javascript: mongodb along with a node.js api. we also use heroku postgres. xively is a core component of our stack. we use the xively add-on to sync our her

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/9Hc4qzJ88CQ/freight-farms-on-heroku
we recently launched apache kafka on heroku into beta. just like we do with heroku postgres, our internal engineering teams have been using our kafka service to power a number of our internal systems. the big idea the heroku platform comprises a large number of independent services. traditionally we’ve used http calls to communicate between these services. while this approach is simple to implement and easy to reason about, it has a number of drawbacks. synchronous calls mean that the top-level request time will be gated by the slowest backend component. also, internal api calls create tight point-to-point couplings between services that can become very brittle over time. asynchronous messaging has been around a long time as an alternative architecture for communicating between services.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/t_i7utMkL-c/powering-the-heroku-platform-api-a-distributed-systems-approach-using-streams-and-apache-kafka
at heroku, we're always working towards increased operational stability with the services we offer. as we recently launched the beta of apache kafka on heroku, we've been running a number of clusters on behalf of our beta customers. over the course of the beta, we have thoroughly exercised kafka through a wide range of cases, which is an important part of bringing a fast-moving open-source project to market as a managed service. this breadth of exposure led us to the discovery of a memory leak in kafka, having a bit of an adventure debugging it, and then contributing a patch to the apache kafka community to fix it. issue discovery for the most part, we’ve seen very few issues running kafka in production. the system itself is very stable and performs very well even under massive a

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/2hMSx363Qjc/fixing-kafka-memory-leak
heroku recently released a managed apache kafka offering. as a node.js developer, i wanted to demystify kafka by sharing a simple yet practical use case with the many node.js developers who are curious how this technology might be useful. at heroku we use kafka internally for a number of uses including data pipelines.  i thought that would be a good place to start. when it comes to actual examples, java and scala get all the love in the kafka world.  of course, these are powerful languages, but i wanted to explore kafka from the perspective of node.js.  while there are no technical limitations to using node.js with kafka, i was unable to find many examples of their use together in tutorials, open source code on github, or blog posts.  libraries implementing kafka’s binary (and fairly

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/PONiGtJshpo/kafka-data-pipelines-frp-node
the ruby maintainers continued their annual tradition by gifting us a new ruby version to celebrate the holiday: ruby 2.4 is now available and you can try it out on heroku. ruby 2.4 brings some impressive new features and performance improvements to the table, here are a few of the big ones: binding#irb - runtime invocation for irb unified integers - fixnum and bignum are now integer rounding changes - more accurate kernel#sprintf rounding background: 32-bit vs 64-bit word length c data models fixnum sizes across rubies proposed changes gaussian rounding hash changes - open addressing for cache utilization via full cycle lcg background: processor caching a diy hash: turbohash open addressing linear probing the linear congruential generator binding#irb have you ever used p or puts to get th

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/pU3iG8DbZ9A/ruby-2-4-features-hashes-integers-rounding
at rubykaigi i caught up with matz, koichi, and aaron patterson aka tenderlove to talk about ruby 3x3 and our path so far to reach that goal. we discussed koichi’s guild proposal, just-in-time compilation and the future of ruby performance. jonan: welcome everyone. today we are doing an interview to talk about new features coming in ruby 3. i am here with my coworkers from heroku, sasada koichi and yukihiro matsumoto, along with aaron patterson from github. jonan: so, last year at rubykaigi you announced an initiative to speed up ruby by three times by the release of version three. tell us more about ruby 3x3. matz: in the design of the ruby language we have been primarily focused on productivity and the joy of programming. as a result, ruby was too slow, because we focused on run-time e

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/heroku/~3/wEg5P5y-KCU/ruby-3-by-3

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